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12
votes
4answers
423 views

How does the emf “know” what the magnetic flux is?

I came across an example in my book where it has the changing flux from a solenoid passing through a larger ring at the end. Here's a picture: How does the large loop (or radius $r_1$) even ...
8
votes
1answer
15k views

Does a positive or negative charge attract a neutral object?

Three objects are brought close to each other, two at a time. When objects A and B are brought together, they attract. When objects B and C are brought together, they repel. From this, we conclude ...
7
votes
4answers
5k views

Can you make ice red hot?

This video clip allegedly shows an otherwise unspecified ice cube that turns red hot (and burns) due to induction heating. Can somebody explain how this works?
7
votes
1answer
264 views

Motion in a time-dependent uniform magnetic field

Suppose you have an infinite solenoid generating an uniform magnetic field inside. The field is oriented along the solenoid axis : unit vector $\vec{\bf n}$. The field intensity varies linearly with ...
6
votes
0answers
64 views

Weird phenomenon on aluminum laptop casing [duplicate]

A couple of days ago I observed a phenomenon which I'm not sure I understand correctly. My brother-in-law has recently bought an ASUS gaming laptop in an aluminum casing. When the power supply is ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Calculate electric field induced by a changing magnetic field

I want to plot the electric field (as a vector field plot) which is induced by a changing magnetic field for some simple cases. Suppose for example that the magnetic field changes linearly (or ...
5
votes
1answer
607 views

Can an induction coil heat two layers of metal?

Imagine we have an induction coil which is strong enough to heat a sheet of metal. We can put a sheet of ferromagnetic metal close to the coil at distance $h_1$, and it gets heated to temperature ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Why doe we not get a shock on induction cooker?

In induction cooking, eddy currents in cook-pot cause heat to be produced. But why do we not get a shock? Also, why is it that current is converted to heat while it has a good conductor(say, steel) ...
5
votes
1answer
258 views

Can I feel (the results of) electromagnetic induction from overhead rail lines in the human body?

A few weeks back, I was standing at a Hornsey rail station (in the UK) which uses overhead lines, and particularly has a number of parallel rail lines, all close to the platform. While I was standing ...
5
votes
1answer
772 views

Magnetic Levitation : Confusion with Lenz's Law

Considering the above diagram, I am failing to see why the aluminium ring floats upwards rather than oscillates. I understand Faraday's law, but I am struggling with Lenz's law - as there is an ...
5
votes
4answers
366 views

Induction cooker + superconductive pot [closed]

What will happen if I put a super-conductive object on an induction cooker, and turn the cooker on?
4
votes
4answers
928 views

Can current be induced in a superconductor?

Moving a magnet close to a conductor induces a current. If it consists of a superconducting material with resistance $R=0$, then my textbook says: Then the induced current will continue to flow ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it possible to get energy from electrical wire using induction?

Pardon me if this is a stupid question but my physics courses are from a long long time ago and I was a teenager back then. ;) Electricity in a wire generates electromagnetism, right? Would it be ...
4
votes
2answers
6k views

Does changing the electric / magnetic field cause self-reinforcing induction of the other?

I understand that changing electric field produces magnetic field and changing magnetic field produces electric field. Are these produced magnetic and electric field produced due to one defined to be ...
4
votes
1answer
256 views

Why an inductor parallel with a light bulb makes it flash as a key closes the circuit?

The title is a simplified form of my question. To be precise, I'm talking about the following circuit: The inductor has a resistanse equal to the resistor in the circuit. So, the question is that, ...
4
votes
3answers
6k views

Non-conservative electric fields due to changing magnetic flux?

What I read in several places, tells me that, the fact Coulomb's Law follows inverse-square law and gives a force which is radial, implies that a static electric field must be conservative.(In short, ...
4
votes
3answers
820 views

How are the Lorentz force, Maxwell's third law and Faraday's law of induction clasically related?

Faraday's law of induction can be used in any situation where the magnetic flux is changing through a closed conducting loop. While giving the correct answer, it seems to me that for the following ...
4
votes
1answer
763 views

Explaining Lenz's Law without conservation of energy

I was often told by my professor, using the following example, to demonstrate the relationship of conservation of energy and Lenz's Law. If you push a conductor into a constant magnetic field. By ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Measuring voltage drop from induced current

I'm having trouble connecting voltage drops and induced current. Imagine you have a triangular loop make up off three resistors. You place this loop in a constantly changing magnetic field. This ...
4
votes
2answers
234 views

What is the area in Faraday's law if we have only a piece of metal moving in a magnetic field?

If a piece of metal of length $l$ is moving with a speed $v$ in a region where there is a uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it, there will be a potential difference across its terminals ...
3
votes
4answers
946 views

Faraday's paradox

I have studied that Faraday's law of induction and motional emf are two different lines of thinking but are essentially same. But then, how can Faraday's paradox be explained by Faraday's law of ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Application of Kirchhoff's laws in circuits with inductors

As we know,the Kirchhoff circuit laws are applicable for conservative electric fields. Now it is applicable for circuits where inductors are present but the field there is not conservative. So how ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Transformer and magnetic field/flux through the iron core?

I am familiar with how a transformer works. This is the diagram that I found on the wikipedia page: The current through the red solenoid varies with time, which creates a time-dependent magnetic ...
3
votes
2answers
80 views

Kirchoff's rules and inductance

Can Kirchoff's loop rule be applied in a scenario involving an inductor? Kirchoff's loop rule states that the closed loop integral of E dot dl is equal to zero. But, in a situation with an inductor, a ...
3
votes
2answers
211 views

Does the induced Electric field develop instantly or lags by $\frac rc$?

Consider a loop of radius $r_0=3 \times 10^8$ cm. A thin bar magnet is passed through its center. This implies that the magnetic flux through the loop will change. Now according to Faraday's law a non ...
3
votes
4answers
275 views

How does an inductor store magnetic energy?

I am trying to figure out what the potential energy of an inductor with a current really means. In a capacitor, the energy stored works like this: if you let the plates attract each other, before ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Work done by Lorentz Force in case of motional emf

In the classical example of the slidewire generator where the rod slides on a U-shaped conductor in a magnetic field, we get a charge separation due to the Lorentz force. The way the induced emf is ...
3
votes
1answer
254 views

Does an Inductor maintain it's energy?

Consider a simple LCR ac circuit; generally I (might) understand that the charge exchange between capacitor and inductor would induce a harmonic current flow, but I remain confused for two reasons: ...
3
votes
1answer
317 views

Induced magnetic field produces electric field and vice versa forever!

So here are the two of Maxwell's laws that I am interested in: So we have the simple circuit (from google): So, before the system goes into steady-state we know that charge slowly accumulates on ...
3
votes
2answers
390 views

Why is there no induced electric field in the experiment (Faraday's Law)

Below are three circuit diagrams for each of Faraday's experiments that allowed Faraday to come up with Faraday's Law. In Griffiths' Introduction to Electrodynamics Griffiths states (on page 302 of ...
3
votes
3answers
866 views

What is the current through the lamp?

We have the following circuit: A neon lamp and a inductor are connected in parallel to a battery of 1.5 $V$. The inductor has a 1000 loops, a length of $5.0 cm$, an area of $12cm^2$ and a ...
3
votes
3answers
505 views

How to find the direction of an eddy current?

Suppose there is a magnetic field going from left to right. Suppose a thin sheet of metal conductor (e.g. a 1m*1m square) is dropped through the magnetic field such that the plane of the conductor is ...
3
votes
2answers
185 views

Why in electrostatics is $dV=-E.dr$ but in electromagnetic induction, $EMF=+E.dS$?

In electrostatics we learned that $$dV=-E.dr$$. I understood the derivation which was used to derive this. Now when I have come to Electromagnetic Induction,I see that when there is a time varying ...
3
votes
0answers
197 views

Induced current created by a magnet falling in a copper tube?

One of the educational demos often shown in schools is to drop a high strength neodymium magnet down a length of copper tube. It takes a considerable time to exit the tube because as it falls it ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

If you toss a handful of confetti onto a comb, why does some of it stick and some of it fly away?

My guess is some paper pieces happen to be charged with the opposite charge compared to the comb, so they are attracted, but once they touch the comb, their charge is neutralized. But the comb is ...
3
votes
0answers
290 views

Attraction and repulsion of electron spin ups and electron spin downs

Alright, we know that copper is a diamagnetic material, which has paired electrons. These paired electrons have different spin. I'm specifically interested in what is going on with the electrons in a ...
3
votes
0answers
275 views

Faradays Law: How Does Curl E Change Over Time In a Coil?

I think I am currently making a mistake regarding my interpretation of Faraday's Law. $\vec{\nabla}\times\vec{E}=-\frac{\partial\vec{B}}{\partial t}$ Assuming we have an electric field $\vec{E}$ in ...
3
votes
0answers
446 views

Finding the terminal velocity of a magnet dropped in a solenoid

We have to find proportionality of the terminal velocity with the factors of the system: Plot: a small dipole(mass $m$) with dipole moment $\mu$ is dropped in a long solenoid (radius $r$, ...
2
votes
2answers
103 views

Why is an $LC$ oscillator lossless, but $C V^2 / 2$ energy is lost to a capacitor connected to an ideal voltage source?

It is mathematically proven that in an $LC$ oscillation that all the energy gets transferred from the inductor to the capacitor and vice versa. There is no energy loss as there is no load in the ...
2
votes
2answers
512 views

Why do old transformers make sounds, but new ones don't?

What I think is that maybe insulation is gradually removed between plates, and eddy currents start passing from one plate to another and this produces sound. Am I right?
2
votes
2answers
290 views

locality vs non-locality

Suppose we have a circular loop of wire, and we put a long perfect solenoid inside it which is connected to an AC voltage source so that the magnetic field inside it starts to vary by time, does this ...
2
votes
2answers
118 views

Why is Kirchhoff's second law commonly used for circuits involving inductivity?

I have often seen in introductory literature, e.g. for the activation process of a circuit with a power source which delivers the voltage $U$, current $I$, resistance $R$ and an inductivity $L$, that ...
2
votes
2answers
266 views

Is light moving because of self induction? [duplicate]

Light is made by an electric field wave and a magnetic field wave. Induction laws state that a variation in the electric field creates a magnetic field and vice versa. Therefore can it be said that ...
2
votes
2answers
927 views

Cause of electromagnetic induction?

The rate of change of magnetic flux through a surface (open) is related with the line integral over the closed loop binding the selected surface by one of the Maxwell's equation. But that means even ...
2
votes
1answer
534 views

Does special relativity unify the two phenomena at the base of Faraday's flux law (was Feynman wrong in this case)?

Consider Faraday's flux law for the EMF generated in a conductor loop: $$ \varepsilon = - \frac{d \phi}{dt},$$ where $\varepsilon$ is the EMF, and $\phi$ is the magnetic flux through the loop. ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

Can pulsating DC current be transformed?

Since pulsating DC current is changing, why doesn't it induce a changing magnetic flux in the transformer core? Is it able to induce a transformed current in the secondary coil?
2
votes
3answers
165 views

Zero current induced in a loop

Consider the following two cases, Case 1 – A coil moving through a constant magnetic field Case 2 – A conductor moving through a constant magnetic field Now, in Case 1 (a coil moving through a ...
2
votes
3answers
231 views

How does an Inductor “store” energy?

It seems to me that an electromagnetic field is nothing more than a collection of photons, which as I've heard, extends through space infinitely. Why is it, then, that an inductor such as simple ...
2
votes
2answers
600 views

Predicting Polarity of capacitor in the given diagram

I have to determine the polarity of the Capacitor in the given diagram. I Approached the problem as follows: When Magnet 1 moves with its North pole towards the coil, emf is induced in the coil as ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Teflon and induction cookware

I remember once getting new Teflon (non-stick) cookware; however, when I tried this new cookware on my induction cooker the cookware did not heat up. My regular steel cookware worked just fine on the ...