A gas that behaves as randomly moving, non-interacting molecules. This allows a simplified equation of state.

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Compressibility factor and deviation from ideal gas behaviour

I have recently started to study the deviation of ideal gas behavior. The source from which I am reading doesn't give me an intuitive understanding of the compressibility factor. I dont understand how ...
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2answers
48 views

Why don't air cool over time?

Say you have a balloon full of a type of gas, it is completely isolate from everything else. Let the temperature of the gas be 20 degrees (or any temperature, it doesn't matter) Now, the ballon is ...
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1answer
60 views

Using the ideal gas law to figure final pressure [on hold]

I'm studying for the GRE and I'm happy with Charles', Boyle's and Gay-Lussac's laws. I'm doing some questions on the ideal gas law. Please hear me out. This may come across as a homework style ...
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3answers
122 views

Work done by an ideal gas expressed as change in potential energy of fluid

I get confused in problems where it is necessary to evaluate the work done by a gas that someway moves a mass. I'll make an example. Consider the tube containing mercury and an ideal gas in A (...
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3answers
67 views

Enthalpy of condensation

suppose we have one mole of an ideal gas undergoing a phase change at constant temperature. we know that enthalpy change is given by the formula $n\cdot Cp\cdot\delta(T)$. since there is no ...
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2answers
5k views

Compressed air in a volume: Can I determine its temperature?

Using a compressor, I augment the pressure in a volume (using atmospheric air). I only measure the pressure inside. I now that the density will increase however, the temperature decreases. Can any one ...
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4answers
160 views

Does a reversible heat engine exchanging heat with an ideal gas that does a transformation imply that transformation is reversible?

Consider a reversible heat engine working between two sources. Suppose that one of the sources is a thermostat, while the other is an ideal gas which follows a transformation and exchanges some heat ...
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2answers
240 views

Viscosity for steam in the Reynolds number

In calculating the Reynolds number for a flow of steam in a pipe, this is the general formula I am trying to use: $$Re=\frac{\rho d v}{\mu}$$ with density $\rho$, pipe diameter $d$, flow steam $v$ ...
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0answers
44 views

Mixed Gas Absorbtion

Consider a gas misture that contains two type of atom, A and B. The gas is in equilibrium at temperature $T$. If on the surface of the gas container there are M sites that can absorb an atom gas, and ...
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1answer
66 views

What is meant by a “change in volume of a system”?

I keep getting confused when my professor talks about the change in volume of a system. Sometimes it seems as though he's talking about the volume of the gas and at other times he might be talking ...
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1answer
134 views

Why is it not possible to use the ideal gas law to determine if the pressure changed in this situation?

I was given this question for my homework: A cylinder with a valve at the bottom is filled with an ideal gas. The vale is now opened and some of the gas escapes slowly. The valve is then closed, ...
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1answer
50 views

Balloon of ideal gas pops in vacuo - K.E. per atom unchanged, velocities become locally correlated?

My question is: is the following thinking pretty much correct? I'm interested hearing about anything here that is fundamentally wrong. Of course there is a bit of hand waving and approximation. If a ...
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1answer
39 views

Ohnesorge Number - why square root?

I understood the Weber number, but why would the Ohnesorge Number go like this: $$Oh = \frac{\text{viscous forces}}{\sqrt{\text{inertia $\cdot$ surface tension}}}$$ Why the root? There seems to be no ...
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1answer
58 views

Newton's 2nd Law with Dirac Delta, as a way to derive the Ideal Gas Law

I'm trying to derive the ideal gas law from first principles, namely that a particle bouncing off a wall will exert a force on the wall. Newton's second law $F=\frac{dp}{dt}$ relates the force an ...
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2answers
61 views

What VOLUME does exactly the $V$ term in ideal gas equation represent?

According to kinetic theory of gases 'the actual volume occupied by the gas molecules are negligible in comparison to the volume of the container.' I believe that this assumption is significant ...
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1answer
38 views

Entropy change in mixture of two gases

I'm confused about the entropy change if two gases, initially separated, are mixed togheter in a rigid box. I use the following $$\Delta S_1= n_1 c_{v,1} \mathrm{ln}( \frac{T_f}{T_{i,1}}) + n_1 R \...
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2answers
38 views

Motion of molecules of an ideal gas

Why does an ideal gas show only translatory motion and not vibratory motion?
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3answers
34 views

The effect of surface area on the pressure exerted by gases

In a video about the relation between pressure and volume on Khanacademy, Sal says that on increase in volume the particles hit the wall less often because the volume has increased and the surface ...
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1answer
639 views

Understanding collision terms in Boltzmann equation

I am reading a paper that deals with the Boltzmann equation. They add a collision which is supposed to account for collisions which happen when particles are within a radius of $d$ from each other. ...
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2answers
28 views

Molar Specific Heat Definitions for Gases

In most textbooks, the molar specific heat of a gas is defined for gases at constant volume and constant pressure as follows : $C_v = \frac{Q}{n\Delta T} = \frac{\Delta U}{n \Delta T}$ $C_p = ...
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176 views

If I double the amount of oxygen molecules, do I double the paramagnetic force?

Oxygen is well known to be paramagnetic. If I take one molecule, $O_2$, and measure its paramagnetic force due to externally applied magnetic field, and then add another molecule near the first ...
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2answers
66 views

Pressure exerted by a gas and the ideal gas equation

While determining the pressure exerted by any gas at a temperature why do we not consider the surface area of the container in which it is kept? We say that : P=nRT/V, where, n is the no. of moles, R ...
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1answer
32 views

Do air particles always rush to fill a container? [closed]

I'm sitting here in the metro station, drinking a bottle of water, and watching how the flow of water out of my mouth changes as air rushes into the bottle. My questions is: in space, obviously the ...
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4answers
494 views

Conversion of ideal gas to real gas via $Z$ compression factor

The ideal gas equation $PV=nRT$ can be converted into real gas equation by compression factor $Z$ i.e $PV=Z~ nRT)$. My question is what is $Z$ and how does it arise? Is $PV/nRT$ a compression ratio of ...
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1answer
328 views

Gas compressed and cooled

If a certain amount of a gas is compressed into a cylinder by the action of a piston that reduces its volume (lets say at a low speed), the kynetic energy of the gas molecules increases, what is ...
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26 views

How do I compute mass flow rate for a compressible fluid?

Consider the vacuum chamber in the figure. If a hole with cross section area $A_{cs}$ is created, how can I approximate the maximum mass flow rate, $\dot{m}$, for a compressible fluid (e.g. air)?
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24 views

Ratio of Stagnation to Normal Flow Properties in Incompressible Flows

I know in compressible flows the ratio of stagnation to normal flow variables is a function of the Mach number and usually the specific heat ratio. Does this ratio mean anything for incompressible ...
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3answers
46 views

Gas pressure within containers [closed]

If, hypothetically, a gas had no inner pressure, and it was made to fill up a container. If, then, the pressure within the container was increased by filling it up with yet more gas, until high ...
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1answer
46 views

Why does stagnation pressure reduce across a normal shock?

I am seeking an explanation for this graph where the subscript "1" refers to the supersonic region and the subscript "2" refers to the subsonic region present beyond a normal shock. The static ...
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2answers
37 views

estimating deviations from ideal gas behaviour

How can one estimate the pressure at which argon atoms show deviations from ideal gas behaviour due to the finite size of the atoms? I have tried Taylor expanding the hard sphere gas equation: $$P'(...
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1answer
31 views

Why do molecules in a gas not generally arrange themselves at the distance of minimum potential energy (Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential)

As the title suggests, why is this? Is it because the distance of molecules in a gas is too large (compared to in liquids/solids)? Or are there other reasons for this?
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1answer
60 views

How does pressure change over time in an open box?

Imagine that you have a 1 cubic meter metal box with two 20 mm diameter holes. One of them is connected to an air-compressor that constantly pressurizes the inside of cube. Let's say 5 atm. The other ...
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1answer
46 views

Behavior of atom's wave packets in a gas

It is my understanding that the wave packet of a free localized particle spreads with time. My question is what is the best description of the particles in a gas inside a closed container: Do they ...
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0answers
13 views

Kinetic gas theory: How large are rotational and vibrational energy for a linear diatomic molecule?

Let's say one has given a temperature of a simple linear diatomic gas like Hydrogen $H_2$. From the temperature one knows the energy of the gas, but how does this energy "split up" to the different ...
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1answer
966 views

Why is it difficult to mix helium and nitrogen gases?

I recently learned an interesting fact: That it's difficult to mix helium and nitrogen gases in a compressed gas cylinder. Gas suppliers that need to mix the two gases have to rotate the cylinders for ...
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1answer
67 views

Deriving Ideal Gas law from Hamiltonian Mechanics

I just don't understand the explanation in Wikipedia. Is there a nice & elegant way of arriving at the Ideal Gas Law from Hamilton's Equations?
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8answers
271 views

Ideal gas law: Will the piston move at all?

We have the following experimental setup: Before the experiment starts: $$p_1=p_2; \space V_1=V_2; T_1=T_2+\Delta T$$ The experiment starts and both the containers are heated so that the ...
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2answers
82 views

Intuitive explanation of the shape of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution

At higher temperatures (for an ideal gas), the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is spread more widely and has a lower maximum. At lower temperatures, the spread is much more narrow and the peak is much ...
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2answers
74 views

Ideal gas equation and atmosphere of Venus

I'm teaching myself some basics of the ideal gas law and working out simple density equations for atmospheric gases at various altitudes. When I applied the gas law to Venus' atmosphere at its ...
2
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1answer
200 views

Bernoulli Equation for isentropic ideal gas flow

If one derives the Bernoulli Equation for the isentropic ideal gas flow you get: $$ \frac{1}{2}v^2 + g z + \left(\frac{\kappa}{\kappa -1} \right) \frac{p}{\rho} = const. $$ Two questions: Is ...
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48 views

Approximating Gas Density

So this was a random thought I had that I thought would be fun to mess around with using an Arduino and some sensors, but after the difficulty I've had I'm just curious to see if it can be done at all....
2
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2answers
13k views

Work Done in an Isobaric Process

I am given the information that an air parcel undergoes isobaric heating from 0° C to 20° C, and that's all I'm given. I have to determine the work done by the parcel on its surroundings. I know that $...
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2answers
40 views

Density of air using ideal gas law

I need to find the density of air using (I think) the ideal gas law. I have calculated $V$ of an ideal gas at s.t.p. to be $.0224m^3$. I am asked to find the density of air knowing it's temperature ($...
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2answers
42 views

Does the increase of pressure of a gas also increase the energy?

It says that in adiabatic process, the heat is constant but the temperature is not. My question is, if you increase the pressure, the temperature is going to rise as pV = kT. But we know that the ...
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2answers
39 views

Mixture of different gases filling their container

If I have a closed container with a mixture of two or more gases $\rho_1$ and $\rho_2$ for instance at thermal equilibrium where $\rho_1>\rho_2$ how would I determine what percentage of the ...
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1answer
17 views

What are the assumptions made when analysing a stretched elastic string from a thermodynamic aspect?

Consider a stretched elastic string. Then conducting a thermodynamic analysis of the elastic string. The approach is very similar to that used for $(P, V, T)$ systems, with the pressure and volume ...
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3answers
247 views

Not Quasi-static, yet reversible process? Is this a valid example?

Imagine a gas (at room temp. and pressure) enclosed in a thermally insulating spherical container. At some instant, the container instantly expands symmetrically (radially outward) to, say, twenty ...
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1answer
47 views

Calculation of internal energy and entropy of ideal gas

I am having some trouble with calculation of entropy and internal energy for ideal gas. All sources which provide such derivations which I managed to find either assume a priori that $U$ is some ...
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2answers
44 views

Why does an ideal gas not consist of identical molecules? [closed]

since the mass , temperature , and number of particles are the same , shouldn't the molecules be the same so that the pressure of the gad is inversely proportional to the volume.