Radiation that comes from pair production quantum effects in close vicinity to an event horizon, leading to the potential for eventual evaporation of black holes. Two mirror particles are created with one falling behind the horizon, becoming casually lost to the rest of the universe, including its ...

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Why does one particle in Hawking radiation have negative energy? [duplicate]

So as I understand it, Hawking radiation occurs when virtual antiparticle-particle pair are created near the event horizon of a black hole due to vacuum fluctuations because of Heisenberg uncertainty ...
2
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1answer
272 views

What are the virtual particles generated during the Hawking radiation?

What are the virtual particle pairs generated during the Hawking radiation? If a photon is emitted by Hawking radiation, what is its negative energy partner which fell into the black hole? Does it ...
8
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1answer
178 views

Hawking radiation for closely orbiting black holes

Suppose we have two black holes of radius $R_b$ orbiting at a distance $R_r$. I believe semi-classical approximations describe correctly the case where $R_r$ is much larger than the average black body ...
5
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1answer
124 views

What happens to objects sucked into a black hole after the black hole evaporates away?

Suppose an object falls into a black hole that's so massive that it wouldn't get torn apart at the event horizon. What happens to it after the black hole evaporates away? According to the theory ...
14
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2answers
539 views

Doesn't the Schwarzschild metric combined with Hawking radiation imply that nothing ever gets past the event horizon of a black hole?

According to the General Theory of Relativity, the coordinate time distance per spacetime distance traveled by a particle freely falling into a black hole gets closer and closer to $0$ as the particle ...
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101 views

Hawking radiation at the mouth of Schwarzschild wormholes

I was researching a question for another post and it occurred to me that you might expect to see Hawking radiation at the mouth of wormholes. Given the mechanism of Hawking radiation at the event ...
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1answer
54 views

What's new about Hawking's theories in relation to 't Hooft's?

What's new about Hawking's theories in relation to 't Hooft's about resolving the black hole information paradox? Thanks "The information is stored in a super translation of the horizon that the ...
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638 views

Is the Hawking radiation of a charged black hole thermal?

Suppose you have a Schwarzschild black hole of mass $M$ and angular parameter $a = 0$ (no rotation). Question: is it possible to throw a charge $Q$ at a faster rate than it will be re-radiated? Will ...
6
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2answers
176 views

What happen if Hawking radiation is not found?

I'm not a physicist but reading from a few popsci books. I read that Hawking has equations that explain Hawking Radiation precisely, right? Is this equation a proof that the radiation is real or we ...
4
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1answer
225 views

Is the new Hawking black hole all about photon launch angles?

The new Jan 2014 Hawking paper (arXiv:1401.5761v1) asserts on page 3: The absence of event horizons means that there are no black holes - in the sense of regimes from which light can't escape to ...
27
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4answers
1k views

If I fall into an evaporating black hole, where do I end up?

This question has been bothering me for a while. I have a crude hypothesis... As I understand it, an observer falling into a black hole will cross the event horizon at some specific future (proper) ...
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1answer
34 views

Does binary black holes evaporate slower because they compete for attracting virtual particles?

Is it true that if 2 black holes are near each other, such as binary black holes, will evaporate slower than when they are far apart, because they are competing for attracting virtual particles each ...
5
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1answer
149 views

Is Hawking radiation really the same as Unruh radiation

I read that Hawking radiation is the same as Unruh radiation. However, there seems to be a paradox here. If you have an extreme black hole (say with maximum charge), then it has temperature 0 and ...
6
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5answers
239 views

Can the event horizon save conservation laws for black holes?

How reasonable it it to conclude that, from a remote observer’s frame, matter falling towards a black hole never crosses the event horizon, because ∆ t → 0 as v → c (according to the Lorentz transform)...
3
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1answer
67 views

If Black holes are maximal entropy how can they evaporate?

According to Hawking/Bekenstein a black hole represents the highest amount of entropy for a given volume, (actually the entropy is related to the surface area of the black hole but the fact that they ...
6
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2answers
290 views

Are black holes eternal?

The question might sound very easy - Hawking radiation, however I was pondering that as you get closer and closer to a black hole, time dilates exponentially where the surface of the black hole is "...
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2answers
539 views

An explanation of Hawking Radiation

Could someone please provide an explanation for the origin of Hawking Radiation? (Ideally someone who I have been speaking with on the h-bar) Any advanced maths beyond basic calculus will most ...
0
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1answer
37 views

How would one attach black hole to starship in the Black hole Starship model? [closed]

A black hole starship is a theoretical idea for enabling interstellar travel by propelling a starship by creating an artificial black hole and using a parabolic reflector to reflect its Hawking ...
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1answer
52 views

Why does imaginary periodic time of the Rindler space of black hole give Hawking temperature?

The metric of a Schwarzschild black hole in Rindler coordinates is $$ds^2= -\frac{\rho^2}{(4MG)^2} dt^2 +d\rho^2 + d\mathbf x_\perp$$ where $\rho$ gives us the distance to the horizon. If we switch ...
1
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0answers
49 views

Could dark energy and Hawking radiation be the same thing? [closed]

Specifically, could black holes effectively emit some kind of negative mass or other form of dark energy, so that the mass of the black hole itself would actually increase rather than decrease (...
2
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3answers
176 views

Gravitational wave contribution of the Hawking radiation from a black hole

Black holes are expected to radiate like a perfect black radiator at the Hawking temperature, which means that they'll emit all particles according to the relevant formulas one can derive using ...
5
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2answers
108 views

A doubt regarding Black Hole Complementarity

A friend was explaining Black Hole Complementarity to me, and at one point he said that to get a (horrendously) mixed quantum state, i.e. a thermal density matrix without a heat bath, one takes a ...
2
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0answers
54 views

Why would a black hole evaporate? [duplicate]

Hawking radiation doesn't make sense to me, with respect to black holes getting smaller. It would seem that any particle (or anti-particle) leaving the Schwartzchild radius would have a similar anti-...
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2answers
134 views

Is this analogy of Hawking Radiation correct?

Through reading of textbooks and other research papers, I have settled on the analogy of hawking radiation below (Written completely by myself) Within the ergosphere of the black hole, virtual ...
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2answers
195 views

Hawking Radiation and Curvature

From a simple point of view in GR/QM we take a virtual pair creation and presumable they reunite shortly in flat space-time probably representable by a space-time warpage that generates geodesic ...
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1answer
193 views

How does Hawking radiation grow as a black hole evaporates?

The temperature of Hawking radiation is inversely proportional to the mass of a black hole, $T_{\rm H}\propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1}$, and so as the black hole shrinks the temperature of the radiation should ...
3
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1answer
85 views

If an object has a temperature, does it have to radiate?

I'm reading through a powerpoint presentation about Hawking Radiation (HR). They are explaining all of the reasons that built up to the postulate of HR, and one of the reasons is that if there is a ...
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19 views

Hawking radiation and energy-negative energy pair production [duplicate]

A black hole evaporates through hawking radiation, what I don't get is the requirement for an energy-negative energy pair production. Since it's the black hole's gravitational energy that's ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Information from inside a black hole

Now I'm hardly a physicist, but I am pretty interested in it. I was thinking about black holes and the movie Interstellar, and if you've seen it, then one of the central points about it is that they ...
3
votes
2answers
110 views

Why does an evaporating black hole always stay a black hole?

Stars can only collaps and form black holes if their masses are above the Chandrasekhar limit, $M>M_{\rm Pl}^3/M_{\rm hydrogen}^2$. When the universe eventually cools down enough, the black holes ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Spaghettification on an atomic scale?

Spaghettification occurs when an object approaches a singularity. As one comes close enough to the singularity, the gravity at the feet (if this is a human) is greater than that at the head, ...
1
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1answer
66 views

How much energy is released by an evaporating black hole in the last second of its life?

From what I understand, due to Hawking radiation, black holes lose mass in the form of energy (electromagnetic radiation), with these characteristics: The larger the black hole, the less energy it ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Event horizon, and Hawking radiation [duplicate]

When the escape velocity from EH is c, then how can Hawking radiation escapes it? Does it travel faster than c? Or, it escape from outside the EH? If so, how a BH can evaporate beyond EH?
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33 views

Does inflation violate the second law of thermodynamics?

Does inflation violate the second law of thermodynamics? It seems like it would, since quantum fluctuations were scaled up and created the varying density field that lead to Galaxy formation. ...
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36 views

Can a micro black hole hover above a regular black hole?

So let's say you have a black hole $A$, that is small enough for its gravity to be very small, but has strong hawking radiation, and larger black hole, $B$, with very small hawking radiation, but ...
1
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2answers
104 views

Derivation for the temperature of Reissner-Nordström (charged) black hole

A lot of the text for this is from "How does one correctly interpret the behavior of the heat capacity of a charged black hole?" but this concerns a different question. The Reissner-Nordström black ...
3
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3answers
123 views

Can light escape a black hole? [duplicate]

I heard that a black hole is not black because it's escape velocity is greater than or equals to the speed of light. But instead it is black because the light that gets emitted from a black hole gets ...
3
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0answers
68 views

Merger of old black holes

On the eve of a possible announcement on the production of gravitational waves via a black hole merger, I think this question is quite aptly timed. I have a few questions regarding the evolution of ...
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1answer
39 views

Black hole expiration dates [closed]

According to this answer: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/150020/36709 Very "light" black holes have a life expectancy in the range of $10^{18}$ years while very "heavy" black holes have a life ...
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0answers
108 views

Can black holes with the same mass evaporate with different speeds?

I am curious about the following observations: (1) For a normal Schwarzschild black hole, it evaporates according to $dm/dt=-1/m^2$; (2) We have eternal black holes which do not evaporate (though ...
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0answers
56 views

In kerr's black hole solution can the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy be descrete?

In kerr's solution we have: $S_{BH}=\frac{k_{\beta}c^{3}A}{4G\hbar}$ where A is the area of the horizon and equal to $A=8\pi G^2 m(m+\sqrt{m^2 - a^2})$ where $a=\frac{J}{mc}$ and J is the angular ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Black hole starship: Would micro black-hole Hawking radiation emit anti-matter?

My understanding of Hawking radiation is that virtual particle pairs of matter and anti-matter are created from vacuum energy and one of those virtual particles may escape while the other enters the ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Hawking radiation for an observer at infinity

As an external observer at infinity, I observe a star collapsing. But because the surface of the star will be infinitely redshifted, I will never see the formation of the black hole. For me, there ...
3
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0answers
70 views

Hawking radiation: why do only negative mass particles fall into black holes? [closed]

So I have read other questions asked about this topic, but they focus more on positive or negative energies of the virtual particles, and I want to ask specifically about the negative mass issue. ...
1
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0answers
27 views

Considering Hawking radiation, can an object ever actually cross event horizon of a black hole? [duplicate]

The Schwarzschild solution of Einstein's field equations clearly shows that a far away observer sees time slow down for an in-falling object. Relative to him, it takes an infinite amount of time for ...
0
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1answer
132 views

Black Hole Matter to Subatomic Exchange

When matter enters a black hole with a singularity the particles smaller than photons released come from within the black hole or do subatomic particles shed from matter just before matter passes the ...
0
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1answer
97 views

Hawking radiation and black hole evaporation [duplicate]

As I understand it, Hawking radiation predicts black hole evaporation because of quantum effects. After the creation of a particle/anti-particle near the horizon of the black hole, if the one gets ...
0
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0answers
48 views

Hawking paradox [duplicate]

Over the centuries, physicists "gave up" on conservation of elements, conservation of mass and then conservation of energy, which now we know to be related to symmetries. How can we be sure that ...
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0answers
25 views

Clarification on hawking radiation [duplicate]

I read that a pair of entangled quantum particles can spontaneously pop into existence for a brief moment and especially near to the event horizon whereby one of the entangled quantum particle passes ...
3
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0answers
138 views

Are gravastars observationally distinguishable from black holes?

Are observations of Hawking radiation at the acoustic event horizon in Bose-Einstein condensates consistent with gravastars? To reconcile the second law of thermodynamics with the existence of a ...