The central term in the hamiltonian formalism. Can be interpreted as an energy input, or "true" energy.

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33
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1answer
2k views

State of Matrix Product States

What is a good summary of the results about the correspondence between matrix product states (MPS) or projected entangled pair states (PEPS) and the ground states of local Hamiltonians? Specifically, ...
25
votes
5answers
8k views

What does it mean for a Hamiltonian or system to be gapped or gapless?

I've read some papers recently that talk about gapped Hamiltonians or gapless systems, but what does it mean? Edit: Is an XX spin chain in a magnetic field gapped? Why or why not?
18
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2answers
494 views

Does the poisson bracket $\{f,g\}$ have any meaning if neither of $f$ or $g$ is the system's Hamiltonian?

Say one has a mechanical system with hamiltonian $H$, and two other arbitrary observables $f,g$. $H$ is super useful since $\{H, \cdot\} = \frac{d}{dt}$. But does $\{f,g\}$ give any useful information ...
17
votes
2answers
660 views

The formal solution of the Schrödinger equation

Consider the Schrödinger equation (or some equation in Schrödinger form) written down as $$ \tag 1 i \partial_{0} \Psi ~=~ \hat{ H}~ \Psi . $$ Usually, one likes to write that it has a formal solution ...
17
votes
2answers
439 views

Can one write down a Hamiltonian in the absence of a Lagrangian?

How can I define the Hamiltonian independent of the Lagrangian? For instance, let's assume that i have a set of field equations that cannot be integrated to an action. Is there any prescription to ...
17
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the Ground State in QM Always Unique? Why?

I've seen a few references that say that in quantum mechanics of finite degrees of freedom, there is always a unique (i.e. nondegenerate) ground state, or in other words, that there is only one state (...
14
votes
4answers
679 views

Increasing a potential causes increase in energy levels

Suppose a potential $V(x)$, and suppose a bound particle so the allowed energy levels are discrete. Suppose a second potential $\widetilde{V}(x)$ such that $\widetilde{V}(x) \geq V(x)$ for all $x$ (...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Correct way to write the eigenvector of a diagonalized hamiltonian in second quantization

I am studying diagonalization of a quadratic bosonic Hamiltonian of the type: $$ H = \displaystyle\sum_{<i,j>} A_{ij} a_i^\dagger a_j + \frac{1}{2}\displaystyle\sum_{<i,j>} [B_{ij} a_i^\...
11
votes
1answer
8k views

Evolution operator for time-dependent Hamiltonian

When I studied QM I'm only working with time independent Hamiltonians. In this case the unitary evolution operator has the form $$\hat{U}=e^{-\frac{i}{\hbar}Ht}$$ that follows from this equation $$ i\...
11
votes
1answer
950 views

What exactly does the Hamiltonian operator tell us?

I'm confused about how energy and time are linked. On the one hand, the Hamiltonian seems to describe the time evolution of the system because in the time dependent Schrodinger equation, $$ \hat H \...
9
votes
4answers
457 views

Where does the $i$ come from in the Schrödinger equation?

I am currently trying to follow Leonard Susskind's "Theoretical Minimum" lecture series on quantum mechanics. (I know a bit of linear algebra and calculus, so far it seems definitely enough to follow ...
9
votes
2answers
636 views

Regularisation of infinite-dimensional determinants

Can a regularisation of the determinant be used to find the eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian in the normal infinite dimensional setting of QM? Edit: I failed to make myself clear. In finite dimensions,...
8
votes
3answers
134 views

Constructing a Hamiltonian (as a polynomial of $q_i$ and $p_i$) from its spectrum

For a countable sequence of positive numbers $S=\{\lambda_i\}_{i\in N}$ is there a construction producing a Hamiltonian with spectrum $S$ (or at least having the same eigenvalues for $i\leq s$ for ...
8
votes
2answers
372 views

Does Hamilton Mechanics give a general phase-space conserving flux?

Hamiltonian dynamics fulfil the Liouville's theorem, which means that one can imagine the flux of a phase space volume under a Hamiltonian theory like the flux of an ideal fluid, which doesn't change ...
8
votes
1answer
365 views

How to prove that a hamiltonian system is not integrable?

To show that a system is integrable, we just need to find $N$ independent functions $f_j$ such that $\{ f_i, f_j \} = 0$. But how to prove that such a set of functions do not exist? For example, ...
8
votes
1answer
106 views

Hamilton operator in absence of causal order?

I hope, this question isn't too broad or vague. In a recent paper, Ognyan Oreshkov et al. worked out a theory of quantum correlations in absence of any causal order, dropping the assumptions of a ...
7
votes
2answers
222 views

What is $\langle \phi | H | \psi \rangle$ in QM?

I know that $\langle \phi | \psi \rangle$ is the probability of going from the $\psi$-state to the $\phi$-state, and that $\langle \phi | H | \phi \rangle$ is the expectation value of the energy for ...
7
votes
4answers
427 views

Can an Electromagnetic Gauge Transformation be Imaginary?

The Hamiltonian of a non-relativistic charged particle in a magnetic field is $$\hat{H}~=~\frac{1}{2m} \left[\frac{\hbar}{i}\vec\nabla - \frac{q}{c}\vec A\right]^2$$. Under a gauge transformation ...
7
votes
2answers
841 views

Is there a Hamiltonian for the (classical) electromagnetic field? If so, how can it be derived from the Lagrangian?

The classical Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field is $$\mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4\mu_0} F^{\mu \nu} F_{\mu \nu} - J^\mu A_\mu.$$ Is there also a Hamiltonian? If so, how to derive it? I know how ...
7
votes
1answer
643 views

Second quantization

In second quantization we use Hamiltonian in form: $$H=\int d^3x [ \psi^{\dagger}(x) h \psi(x)],$$ where $h$ is Hamiltonian density. The field operators have following form: $$\psi = \sum\limits _{i} \...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

How to decide whether one can use perturbation theory in QM?

In QM, it is said that perturbation theory can be used in the case in which the total Hamiltonian is a sum of two parts, one whose exact solution is known and an extra term that contains a small ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the relationship between Schrödinger equation and Boltzmann equation?

The Schrödinger equation in its variants for many particle systems gives the full time evolution of the system. Likewise, the Boltzmann equation is often the starting point in classical gas dynamics. ...
7
votes
2answers
6k views

How to express a Hamiltonian operator as a matrix

Suppose we have Hamiltonian on $\mathbb{C}^2$ $$H=\hbar(W+\sqrt2(A^{\dagger}+A))$$ We also know $AA^{\dagger}=A^{\dagger}A-1$ and $A^2=0$, letting $W=A^{\dagger}A$ How can we express $H$ as $H=\hbar \...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

How to construct the Hamiltonian matrix?

I'm trying to understand if there's a more systematic approach to build the matrix associated with the Hamiltonian in a quantum system of finite dimension. For example, I know that for the ammonia ...
7
votes
1answer
171 views

Do systems with level crossings have unstable eigenbases?

It's folklore dating back to von Neumann and Wigner that time-dependent Hamiltonian systems tend not to have level crossings of their energy eigenvalues. However, we can of course consider smoothly ...
7
votes
1answer
240 views

Is there a physical interpretation to invariant random matrix ensembles?

Disclaimer. I am a graduate student in pure mathematics, so my knowledge of physics more advanced than basic 1st/2nd year undergraduate physics is very limited. I welcome corrections on any ...
7
votes
0answers
193 views

Role of physics in the zeta function $\zeta$ and the Riemann hypothesis

Hilbert and Polya suggested a physical way to verify the Riemann hypotesis about $\zeta(x)$. If the Riemann hypotesis is true, we can state all eigenvalues of physical problems are real. What is the ...
7
votes
0answers
652 views

Exact diagonalization by Bogoliubov transformation

I am developing a model of multiple gaps in a square lattice. I simplified the associated Hamiltonian to make it quadratic. In this approximation it is given by, $$ H = \begin{pmatrix} \xi_\mathbf{k} ...
6
votes
6answers
515 views

Why does time evolution operator have the form $U(t) = e^{-itH}$?

Let's denote by $|\psi(t)\rangle$ some wavefunction at time $t$. Then let's define the time evolution operator $U(t_1,t_2)$ through $$ U(t_2,t_1) |\psi(t_1)\rangle = |\psi(t_2)\rangle \tag{1}$$ and ...
6
votes
4answers
198 views

Is it possible to reconstruct the Hamiltonian from knowledge of its ground state wave function?

Is it possible to "construct" the Hamiltonian of a system if its ground state wave function (or functional) is known? I understand one should not expect this to be generically true since the ...
6
votes
1answer
792 views

Find the Hamiltonian given $\dot p$ and $\dot q$

I have these equations: $$\dot p=ap+bq,$$ $$\dot q=cp+dq,$$ and I have to find the conditions such as the equations are canonical. Then, I have to find the Hamiltonian $H$. To answer to the first ...
6
votes
2answers
440 views

Poisson brackets of the Kepler Problem

For the hamiltonian of a particle of unit mass in a kepler potential: $$H = \frac{1}{2}\mathbf{p} \cdot \mathbf{p} - \frac{\mu}{r}$$ The angular momentum vector is given by: $\mathbf{L} = \mathbf{r} ...
6
votes
1answer
113 views

Hamiltonian and Energy of a charged particle in an Electromagnetic field

The Lagrangian of a charged particle of charge $e$ moving in an electromagnetic field is given by $$L=\frac{1}{2}m\dot{\textbf{r}}^2-e\phi-e\textbf{A}\cdot \textbf{v}$$ where $\phi(\textbf{r},t)$ is ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

What are the restrictions on the Hamiltonian in QM?

In quantum mechanics, we usually write the Hamiltonian as: $$\hat{H}=\hat{T}+\hat{V}$$ But in classical mechanics, there are several reasons why it would not have this form: We've chosen some ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Expectation value of time-dependent Hamiltonian

I'm trying to solve a problem in QM with a forced quantum oscillator. In this problem I have a quantum oscillator, which is in the ground state initially. At $t=0$, the force $F(t)=F_0 \sin(\Omega t)$ ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Gauge Invariance of the Hamiltonian of the electromagnetic field

The Hamiltonian for an electron of mass $m$ and charge $e$ in an exterior electromagnetic field is $$H=\frac{1}{2m}(p-(e/c)A)^2+e\varphi.$$ The corresponding (via canonical quantization) quantum ...
5
votes
2answers
316 views

Momentum is a cotangent vector?

Imagine we have a particle described by $x \in M$, where $M$ is some manifold, then it is very intuitive I think that a velocity is an element of the tangent space at $x$, so $x' \in T_{x}M.$ Thus, by ...
5
votes
1answer
231 views

Finding the energy levels of an electron in a plane perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field

Suppose we have an electron, mass $m$, charge $-e$, moving in a plane perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field $\vec{B}=(0,0,B)$. Let $\vec{x}=(x_1,x_2,0)$ be its position and $P_i,X_i$ be the ...
5
votes
2answers
165 views

Do asymptotically similar potentials yield similar energy levels asymptotically?

Let there be given two Hamiltonians $$H_1~=~ p^{2}+f(x) \qquad \mathrm{and} \qquad H_2~=~ p^{2}+g(x). $$ Let's suppose that for big big $x$, the potentials are asymptotically similar in the sense ...
5
votes
1answer
598 views

Does the vacuum energy problem of quantum field theory only occur in the Hamiltonian approach, or also in the path integral approach and in AQFT?

In a standard QFT class, you're being indoctrinated that there is the "infinite vacuum energy density problem". (This is sometimes paraphrased as the "cosmological constant problem", which is in my ...
5
votes
3answers
208 views

Does Peskin & Schroeder Eq. (4.26), $U(t_1,t_2)U(t_2,t_3) = U(t_1,t_3)$ imply $[H_0,H_{int}] = 0$?

Peskin & Schroeder equation (4.17) define the operator, \begin{equation} U(t,t_{0})~=~e^{i(t-t_{0})H_{0}}e^{-i(t-t_{0})H} \tag{4.17} \end{equation} where $$H~=~H_0+H_{\text{int}}\tag{4.12}$$ is ...
5
votes
1answer
529 views

center of mass Hamiltonian of a Hydrogen atom

I'm working through Mattuck's "A Guide to Feynman Diagrams in the Many-Body Problem", but I'm stuck on a bit which I feel should be trivial. In section 3.2 (p 43 in the Dover edition) he gives a ...
5
votes
1answer
525 views

Hamiltonians, density of state, BECs

When working with Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in potentials, how can one tell what the density of state of a system of identical bosons given the Hamiltonian, $H$? (I have been told that it is ...
5
votes
1answer
533 views

Question concerning the Lindhard function

I'm having a question concerning the Lindhard function. The reference I'm using is the standard text "Quantum Theory of Solids" by Charles Kittel. I'm concerned with Chapter 6, subchapter "Method of ...
5
votes
0answers
70 views

Hamiltonian System Outside Physics [closed]

What are good examples of Hamiltonian systems outside physics? I heard there are financial systems that can be described by a Lagrangian, and was interested to see some examples
5
votes
0answers
92 views

Hamiltonian Operator for nonrenormalizable Effective Field Theories?

Assuming we have a Effective Field Theory, for example a Real Scalar Field Theory, defined through a Lagrangian density of the form $\mathcal{L}_{eff} = \frac{1}{2}\partial_\mu\phi \partial^\mu\phi - ...
5
votes
0answers
85 views

CM: Need to recover the Hamiltonian, knowing conserved quantities and information about the EOM, possibly via action-angle coordinates

Statement of the problem: I have a system with 2 degrees of freedom and I have found two independent conserved quantities, without knowledge of the Hamiltonian. I'm looking for a method to recover a ...
4
votes
4answers
974 views

How to calculate the quantum expectation of frequency of a particle?

I know how to calculate the expectation of < $\Psi$|A|$\Psi$ > where the operator A is the eigenfunction of energy, momentum or position, but I'm not sure how to perform this for a pure frequency. ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does Quantum Field Theory use Lagrangians rather than Hamiltonains? [duplicate]

Why does Quantum Field Theory use usually Lagrangians rather than Hamiltonains? I heard many reasons, but I'm not sure which is true. Some say it's just a matter of beauty, so Lagrangians are more ...
4
votes
1answer
7k views

What is an energy eigenstate exactly?

Say you have energy eigenstates \begin{align} \begin{split} |+\rangle= \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}|1{\rangle}+\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}|2 \rangle \end{split} \end{align} \begin{align} \begin{split} |-\rangle= \...