The Hamiltonian formalism is a formalism in Classical Mechanics. Besides Lagrangian Mechanics, it is an effective way of reformulating classical mechanics in a simple way. Very useful in Quantum Mechanics, specifically the Heisenberg and Schrodinger formulations. Unlike Lagrangian ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

7
votes
2answers
124 views

Group of symmetries of Lagrange's equations

Consider the following statements, for a classical system whose configuration space has dimension $d$: Lagrange equations admit a smaller group of "symmetries" (coordinate change under which ...
6
votes
2answers
454 views

Analogue of Princeton Companion to Mathematics for Physics?

I would like to know if there are compendiums much like the Princeton Companion to Mathematics for physics (especially classical physics: fluid mechanics, elasticity theory, Hamiltonian formalism of ...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

Degeneracy and the Hamiltonian

How many linearly independent eigenfunctions can be associated with one degenerate eigenvalue of the Hamiltonian operator? (Is there a limit since it contains a 2nd order differential operator?) ...
4
votes
1answer
36 views

Connections of iterative solvers for large systems of equation in Physics?

I am trying to find the domains in physics where solving large systems of equations is computationally expensive. The sparse systems are of my particular interest, where the input matrix A is in GBs ...
0
votes
2answers
403 views

Phase space of a discrete dynamical system

Suppose a dynamical system of one variable $x$ with discrete time-steps. I've seen in some papers a type of graph in which $x(n+1)$ is plotted versus $x(n)$. My questions are : 1/ Can this be ...
5
votes
2answers
729 views

Energy operator

Does the Hamiltonian always translate to the energy of a system? What about in QM? So by the Schrodinger equation, is it true then that $i\hbar{\partial\over\partial t}|\psi\rangle=H|\psi\rangle$ ...
17
votes
1answer
406 views

Sympletic structure of General Relativity

Inspired by physics.SE: http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/15571/does-the-dimensionality-of-phase-space-go-up-as-the-universe-expands/15613 It made me wonder about symplectic structures in ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

To what extent is the “minimal substitution” or “minimal coupling” for the EM vector potential valid?

In all text books (and papers for that matter) about QFT and the classical limit of relativistic equations, one comes across the "minimal substitution" to introduce the magnetic potential into the ...
2
votes
2answers
256 views

Why is it important that Hamilton's equations have the four symplectic properties and what do they mean?

The symplectic properties are: time invariance conservation of energy the element of phase space volume is invariant to coordinate transformations the volume the phase space element is invariant ...
1
vote
1answer
340 views

Sudden change in the Hamiltonian

Could someone explain what this sentence mean? "If the Hamiltonian changes suddenly by a finite amount, the wavefunction must change continuously in order that the time-dependent Schrodinger equation ...
2
votes
1answer
410 views

Expectation of a commutation relation

Is there any significance to: $\langle[H,\hat{O}]\rangle =0$ (which can easily be shown) where $H$ is the Hamiltonian, $\hat{O}$ is an arbitrary operator? Thanks.
10
votes
3answers
4k views

When is the Hamiltonian of a system not equal to its total energy?

I thought the Hamiltonian was always equal to the total energy of a system but have read that this isn't always true. Is there an example of this and does the Hamiltonian have a physical ...
1
vote
1answer
220 views

interpretation of $\{H,L^2\}$

In Hamiltonian mechanics, we show $\{H,L_z\}=0$, which can be interpreted as the conservation of angular momentum around $Oz$. Following the same idea, how can we interprete $\{H,L^2\}$? Is the ...
1
vote
3answers
511 views

Noether's theorem and “translations” of the Hamiltonian function

In a nutshell, Noether's theorem states that for every continuous symmetry a corresponding conserved quantity exists. Now, the Hamiltonian equations of motion (let's talk about a classical system ...
2
votes
0answers
337 views

Calculation of the non-Gaussity parameter for primordial cosmological perturbations by the ADM Formalism

Maldacena has used the ADM Formalism in one of his papers (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0210603) in computing the the three point correlation function (i.e the non-Gaussianity) parameter for ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is the symplectic manifold version of Hamiltonian mechanics used in Newtonian mechanics?

Books such as Mathematical methods of classical mechanics describe an approach to classical (Newtonian/Galilean) mechanics where Hamiltonian mechanics turn into a theory of symplectic forms on ...
5
votes
1answer
303 views

formal framework for talking about 'minimal couplings'

usually on physical theories one would have Lagrangians or Hamiltonians with multiple fields; say, a vector $A_{\mu}$ and a scalar $\phi$ and one would postulate ad hoc a coupling between the fields ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

Physical meaning of Legendre transformation

I would like to know the physical meaning of the Legendre transformation, if there is any? I've used it in thermodynamics and classical mechanics and it seemed only a change of coordinates?
1
vote
2answers
291 views

Multiple classical paths from Hamilton's principle

Previous posts such as this ask about types of stationary point in Hamilton's Principle. There is, however, another aspect to discuss: the question as to whether the extremal path is unique. One ...
6
votes
2answers
446 views

How do we resolve operator ordering ambiguities when quantizing generic nonlinear second-class constraints?

Dirac came up with a general theory of constraints, including second-class constraints. To quantize such systems, he first computed the Dirac bracket classically, and only then "promoted" the ...
3
votes
3answers
455 views

Type of stationary point in Hamilton's principle

In this question it is discussed why by Hamilton's principle the action integral must be stationary. Most examples deal with the case that the action integral is minimal: this makes sense - we all ...
4
votes
1answer
525 views

Mathematica to help for an Hamiltonian problem

I have an Hamiltonian problem whose 2D phase space exhibit islands of stability (elliptic fixed points). I can calculate the area of these islands in some cases, but for other cases I would like to ...
9
votes
9answers
4k views

Book about classical mechanics

I am looking for a book about "advanced" classical mechanics. By advanced I mean a book considering directly Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation, and also providing a firm basis in the geometrical ...