The Hamiltonian formalism is a formalism in Classical Mechanics. Besides Lagrangian Mechanics, it is an effective way of reformulating classical mechanics in a simple way. Very useful in Quantum Mechanics, specifically the Heisenberg and Schrodinger formulations. Unlike Lagrangian ...

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Formalism to deal with discontinuous potentials in classical mechanics (hard wall, hard spheres)

It seems to me that Hamiltonian formalism does not suit well for problems involving instantaneous change of momentum, like particle collisions with hard wall or hard sphere gas model. At least I could ...
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Is the Legendre transformation a unique choice in analytical mechanics?

Consider a Lagrangian $L(q_i, \dot{q_i}, t) = T - V$, for kinetic energy $T$ and generalized potential $V$, on a set of $n$ independent generalized coordinates $\{q_i\}$. Assuming the system is ...
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What is the difference between configuration space and phase space?

What is the difference between configuration space and phase space? In particular, I notices that Lagrangians are defined over configuration space and Hamiltonians over phase space. Liouville's ...
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from microscopic to kinetic transport theory

One way to model the dynamics of particles is to find the differential equation of motion of a particle. Of course, this will be nice and easy to do if we have only a few particles (like one-ish, ...
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Analytical mechanics with SR

Is there an analytical mechanics with SR? Of course you can write down the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian of a free particle. What about non-free? Are there any problems? To be specific: what would the ...
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Time evolution of a classical system [closed]

For a harmonic oscillator the Liouville operator is given by $$L = p \partial_q- q \partial_p.$$ Now I have a phase space distribution $f(t,q,p)$ for which it holds (in general) $$f(t+\tau,q,p)= T\exp(...
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Fermionic Poisson bracket

I'd like to understand the Poisson bracket for fermions in classical field theory defined on a cylinder (with coordinates $(t,x)$, $x$ being the compact direction) and propagating on $T^n$ with ...
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3answers
392 views

Constructing Lagrangian from the Hamiltonian

Given the Lagrangian $L$ for a system, we can construct the hamiltonian $H$ using the definition $H=\sum\limits_{i}p_i\dot{q}_i-L$ where $p_i=\frac{\partial L}{\partial \dot{q}_i}$. Therefore, to ...
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1answer
182 views

Wrong sign anticommutation relation for the Dirac field?

Consider the Dirac Lagrangian $$\mathcal{L}=\psi ^{\dagger }\gamma ^{0}\left( \mathrm{i}\gamma ^{\rho }\partial _{\rho }-m\right) \psi .$$ The conjugate momenta to $\psi ^{a}$ are defined, as usual, ...
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1answer
111 views

Poisson brackets in curved spacetime

The time evolution of any field $\phi$ is given in terms of the Poisson bracket with the Hamiltonian, $$ \frac{\partial\phi}{\partial t} = \{\phi, H\}. $$ How does this relation change in curved ...
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What exactly is the relationship between the symplectic 2-form and the frequency of leaves of integrable systems in classical mechanics?

In classical mechanics we equip a differential manifold with a closed symplectic 2-form $\omega$. The symplectic leaves of integrable systems also have a unique frequency, in literature denoted $\...
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1answer
254 views

Symplectic leaves, tori and Poisson manifolds

For classical systems we can define a configuration manifold, whose cotangent bundle is a momentum phase space equipped with a closed, non-degenerate 2-form. Upon the commutative algebra of smooth ...
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113 views

Canonical commutation relations in Light-cone gauge

It seems that when trying to identify the physical degrees of freedom for the string some authors$^1$ use: $$ q^-=\frac{1}{\ell}\int_0^{\ell} X^-(\tau,\sigma)d\sigma$$ Then, the commutation relation ...
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Taking a 'relative' limit

I am looking at Hamiltonians for specific physical situations. I have taken a given Hamiltonian $\vec{H}(\vec{p}, \vec{x})$ and have found the following Hamiltonian equations: $$\frac{d\vec{x}}{dt} = \...
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1answer
77 views

Derivation of an ordinary, Lagrangian/Hamiltonian and action formulation

I am confused as to how the different formulations in physics are derived. In many fields of physics, we usually begin with an ordinary formulation (e.g Newton's Laws in classical mechanics), and ...
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Amplitude-phase decomposition as a canonical transformation

I am studying a classical dynamical system defined on $\mathbb{CP}^2$: the phase space is parametrized in terms of three complex coordinates $\psi_i$ ($i=1,2,3$) and Hamilton's equations of motion ...
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1answer
77 views

Using tensors on Lagrangian and Hamiltonian

We can write the Lagrangian (with $n$ generalized coordinates) using the following expression: $$\mathcal{L(q_i,\dot{q_i},t)}=\mathcal{L}_0(q_i,t)+\mathcal{L}_1(q_i,\dot{q_i},t)+\mathcal{L}_2(q_i,\...
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1answer
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How does the Hamiltonian change when going to a moving frame?

The Hamiltonian of a free particle in a rotating frame is given by $$ H = H_0 - \omega \cdot J, $$ where $H_0$ is the Hamiltonian in the non-rotating frame, $\omega$ is the angular velocity of the ...
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Hamilton's Principle - achieving Hamilton equations

Consider the action function: $$\mathcal{S}(t)=\int_{t_1}^{t_2}\mathcal{L}(q_i,\dot{q_i},t) dt$$ where $\mathcal{L}$ is the Lagrangian of the system. The Hamiltonian is defined by the following ...
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1answer
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Hamiltonian Noether's theorem in classical mechanics [duplicate]

How does one think about, and apply, Noether's theorem in the classical mechanical Hamiltonian formalism? From the Lagrangian perspective, Noether's theorem (in 1-D) states that the quantity $$\sum_{...
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Lagrangian to Hamiltonian in Quantum Field Theory

While deriving Hamiltonian from Lagrangian density, we use the formula $$\mathcal{H} ~=~ \pi \dot{\phi} - \mathcal{L}.$$ But since we are considering space and time as parameters, why the formula $$\...
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1answer
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Mean field theory Weiss Approximation for the Isling Model of a Protein

A model for protein in 2D can be formed by adding bonds of fixed length $l\sqrt{2}$ on a square lattice along the diagonal, ie $\hat{\mathbf{b}}_i=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\pm \hat{\mathbf{x}}\pm \mathbf{y})...
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Hamilton-Jacobi problem

In analytical mechanics by Fasano and Marmi they consider the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a conservative autonomous system in one dimension with the following Hamiltonian, \begin{equation} H=\frac{p^...
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1answer
259 views

Find Eigenstates of a Hamiltonian that lets two spin 1/2 interact but also acts on one of them

I have the following Hamiltonian describing two spin 1/2 systems, represented by the pauli matrices $\sigma_1$ and $\sigma_2$: $H = D \sigma_{1z} + J (\sigma_1 \cdot \sigma_2) $. The two spins are ...
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Is it possible to formulate a Hamiltonian for a damped system? [duplicate]

I recently found out that it is possible to formulate a Hamiltonian for a system with time-dependent coordinates such that the Hamiltonian is not the same as the energy When is the Hamiltonian of a ...
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1answer
57 views

Books on Liouville Operator

I am looking for a good book doing classical mechanics and statistical mechanics in terms of the Liouville operator. I have not found a lot on this subject and even books like Mathematical Methods of ...
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1answer
109 views

Poisson brackets for constrained system

Let's have some Hamiltonian which involves the set of first class constraints $\varphi$ and set of constraints $\kappa $, which play role of canonical conjugated momentums for $\varphi$,. They're ...
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1answer
705 views

How do we find the phase space density from the Hamiltonian?

How do we find the phase space density from the Hamiltonian? For example: Consider a classical gas made of N identical non-interacting particles in 1d. Each molecule is characterised by centre mass ...
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1answer
98 views

The grand partition function of non interacting hamiltonians

In the case of non interacting particles I know we can write the Hamiltonian as $$H(\mathbf{q}_1,\dots,\mathbf{p}_1,\dots)=\sum_{i=1}^N h(\mathbf{q}_i,\mathbf{p}_i)$$ but I am having trouble ...
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Trick for reformulating in terms of centre of mass and relative variables

I am working through a problem that has caused me difficulties in the past. I have the Hamiltonian $$\mathcal{H}=\frac{p_1^2}{2m_1}+\frac{p_2^2}{2m_2}+\frac{k}{2}(q_1-q_2)^2$$ I want to express the ...
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Finding the phase space density of $N$ harmonic oscillators

Consider a system of $N$ identical harmonic oscillators in 1d. The Hamiltonian will be given by $$\mathcal{H}_N=\sum_{i=1}^N \frac{p_i^2}{2m}+\frac{m\omega^2}{2}q_i^2$$ Now supposedly the Hamiltonian ...
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1answer
178 views

Can I Weyl-order the following Hamiltonian?

I am trying to perform a path integral but I am having trouble with the Weyl ordering of my Hamiltonian. The Lagrangian of the system in question is $$L~=~\frac{1}{2}f(q)\dot{q}^2,$$ where $f(q)$ ...
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Multiply creation operator by a phase factor

A basic question, but I'm not completely confident what I'm doing is legit. I can multiply a creation operator by an arbitrary phase factor and it doesn't change any physics. True? I have a ...
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297 views

Momentum is a cotangent vector?

Imagine we have a particle described by $x \in M$, where $M$ is some manifold, then it is very intuitive I think that a velocity is an element of the tangent space at $x$, so $x' \in T_{x}M.$ Thus, by ...
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What is the correct terminology for a “symplectic covariant” equation?

A Lorentz covariant equation is one that takes the same form even when a Lorentz transformation is applied to each variable. Lorentz covariance is generally made manifest by writing the equation with ...
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Advantages of having a first class system and possibility of transforming a system into a first class one

I have two questions regarding first class systems. What are the advantages of having a first class Hamiltonian (a Hamiltonian whose all constraints are first class) in a theory or having a first ...
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A couple of questions on the ADM formalism in general relativity

I've been reading up on the ADM formalism in general relativity and have been stuck on a couple of concepts. The first is to do with the foliation of spacetime into space-like hypersurfaces. I ...
4
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1answer
134 views

Dimension agreement in canonical transformation

In this Physics.SE post, there is a transformation: $$Q = q,$$ $$P = \sqrt{p} - \sqrt{q}.$$ for Hamiltonian $H = \frac{p^2}{2}$. The post discusses the validity of this transformation as a canonical ...
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1answer
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Path integral in quantum mechanics

I am confused by the derivation in Srednicki QFT's chapter 6 from (6.8) to (6.9). In (6.8), we have $$<q'',t''|q',t'>~=~\int DqDp \exp[i\int_{t'}^{t''}dt(p\dot{q}-H(p,q))],\tag{6.8}$$ and (6....
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1answer
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Classical Hydrogen Atom

I was wondering about the Hamiltonian description of the classical hydrogen atom (two point particles interacting through a Coulumb potential). In particular, I want to know if the fact that ...
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218 views

Lagrangian/Hamiltonian mechanics at high school?

Has anyone developed an approach to teaching mechanics based on Lagrangian/Hamiltonian mechanics from the ground up. I mean from high school on up. This is akin to explicitly not talking about ...
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2answers
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Vanishing of conjugate momentum $\Pi^0$ and non-existence of propagator

We know that if we try to quantize the free electromagnetic field without a gauge fixing term added to the Lagrangian, then one of the conjugate momentum density $\Pi^0$ vanishes. We also find that ...
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1answer
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Which of the Physics textbooks would you recommend I read this quarter (Analytical Mechanics)? [duplicate]

My Analytical Mechanics class this quarter has one required textbook: "Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems" by Thornton & Marion and three recommended readings: "Mechanics" by Landau ...
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1answer
433 views

What is the physical interpretation of the Poisson bracket [duplicate]

Apologies if this is a really basic question, but what is the physical interpretation of the Poisson bracket in classical mechanics? In particular, how should one interpret the relation between the ...
3
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2answers
283 views

Non-relativistic QFT Lagrangian for fermions

Take the ordinary Hamiltonian from non-relativistic quantum mechanics expressed in terms of the fermi fields $\psi(\mathbf{x})$ and $\psi^\dagger(\mathbf{x})$ (as derived, for example, by A. L. Fetter ...
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Can I take the partial derivative of the Lagrangian with respect to a constant?

I've got a system where I know that the derivative of one of the generalized coordinates is constant. So to find the Hamiltonian of the system I need to take the partial derivative with respect to ...
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Hamiltonian linearly proportional to momentum

In this question, it is discussed why, in Lagrangians we usually stick to first derivatives and quadratic terms we never see higher derivatives. The selected answer shows that, if a Lagrangian $L(q, \...
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1answer
133 views

Hamiltonian field equations constraints

Let's consider the Lagrangian $$\mathcal{L}~=~-\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu\phi^\nu)^2+\frac{1}{2}(\partial_\mu\phi^\mu)^2+\frac{1}{2}m^2\phi_\mu \phi^\mu,$$ with Minkowski metric $\eta_{\mu\nu}={\rm ...
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201 views

Phase space Lagrangian?

Reading out of this lecture series we define a phase space Lagrangian $\mathcal L$ to be a function of $4n+1$ variables namely $q,\dot q,p,\dot p,t$. My question is, what space is this function ...
3
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1answer
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When can an autonomous system be written using a Hamiltonian?

If I have an autonomous series of differential equations $$\tag{1} \frac{dx_i}{dt} ~=~ A_i(x_1,...,x_n)$$ with the condition that $$\tag{2} \sum_{i=1}^n\frac{\partial A_i}{\partial x_i}~=~0$$ in all ...