The Hamiltonian formalism is a formalism in Classical Mechanics. Besides Lagrangian Mechanics, it is an effective way of reformulating classical mechanics in a simple way. Very useful in Quantum Mechanics, specifically the Heisenberg and Schrodinger formulations. Unlike Lagrangian ...

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Does a constant of motion always imply a Hamiltonian formulation?

If a continuous dynamical system has a constant of motion that is a function of all its variables, and is not already evidently Hamiltonian, is it always possible to use a change of variables and ...
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Eikonal approximation for wave optics. Why follow the unit vector parallel to the Pointing vector?

The description of the passage from wave optics to geometrical optics claims that light rays are the integral curves of a certain vector field (the Pointing vector direction, normalized to 1). Here ...
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Noise spectrum of two systems and interacting Hamiltonian

I've been discovering recently the concept of noise spectrum, defined as: $$S_{xx}[\omega] = \int dt<x(t)x(0)>\text{e}^{-i\omega t}$$ Roughly the Fourrier transform of the two-point function. ...
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Why not using Lagrangian, instead of Hamiltonian, in non relativistic QM?

When we studied classical mechanics on the undergraduate level, on the level of Taylor, we covered Hamiltonian as well as Lagrangian mechanics. Now when we studied QM, on the level of Griffiths, we ...
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Find the Hamiltonian given $\dot p$ and $\dot q$

I have these equations: $$\dot p=ap+bq,$$ $$\dot q=cp+dq,$$ and I have to find the conditions such as the equations are canonical. Then, I have to find the Hamiltonian $H$. To answer to the first ...
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Find generating function $F_1$ for canonical trasformation

I'd like to know the steps to follow to find the generating function $F_1(q,Q)$ given a canonical transformation. For example, considering the transformation $$q=Q^{1/2}e^{-P}$$ $$p=Q^{1/2}e^P$$ ...
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Solution of motion in hamiltonian formalism

I have these canonical equations: $$\dot p = - \alpha pq$$ $$ \dot q =\frac{1}{2} \alpha q^2$$ I have to find $q(t)$ and p$(t)$, considering initial conditions $p_0$ and $q_0$. I thought to simply ...
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Hamiltonian constraint in spherical Friedmann cosmology

I'm taking a GR course, in which the instructor discussed the 'Hamiltonian constraint' of spherical Friedmann cosmology action. I'm not quite clear about the definition of 'Hamiltonian constraint' ...
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Factors of $c$ in the Hamiltonian for a charged particle in electromagnetic field

I've been looking for the Hamiltonian of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field, and I've found two slightly different expressions, which are as follows: $$H=\frac{1}{2m}(\vec{p}-q \vec{A})^2 ...
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Hamiltonian or not?

Is there a way to know if a system described by a known equation of motion admits a Hamiltonian function? Take for example $$ \dot \vartheta_i = \omega_i + J\sum_j \sin(\vartheta_j-\vartheta_i)$$ ...
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Constructing a Hamiltonian (as a polynomial of $q_i$ and $p_i$) from its spectrum

For a countable sequence of positive numbers $S=\{\lambda_i\}_{i\in N}$ is there a construction producing a Hamiltonian with spectrum $S$ (or at least having the same eigenvalues for $i\leq s$ for ...
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Meaning of a canonical transformation “preserving” a differential form?

In Chapter 9 of Arnold's Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, we find the following definition: Let $g$ be a differentiable mapping of the phase space $\mathbb R^{2n}$ to $\mathbb R^{2n}$. ...
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Hamilton's equations for a simple pendulum

I don't get how to use Hamilton's equations in mechanics, for example let's take the simple pendulum with $$H=\frac{p^2}{2mR^2}+mgR(1-\cos\theta)$$ Now Hamilton's equations will be: $$\dot ...
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What does symplecticity imply?

Symplectic systems are a common object of studies in classical physics and nonlinearity sciences. At first I assumed it was just another way of saying Hamiltonian, but I also heard it in the context ...
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Hamiltonian and non conservative force

I have to find the Hamiltonian of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field; the potential vector is $ \vec {A}= B/2 (-y, x, 0)$. I know that $$H=\sum_i p_i \dot q_i -L$$ where $p_i$ is ...
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689 views

Cyclic Coordinates in Hamiltonian Mechanics

I was reading up on Hamiltonian Mechanics and came across the following: If a generalized coordinate $q_j$ doesn't explicitly occur in the Hamiltonian, then $p_j$ is a constant of motion ...
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Sympletic structure of General Relativity

Inspired by physics.SE: http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/15571/does-the-dimensionality-of-phase-space-go-up-as-the-universe-expands/15613 It made me wonder about symplectic structures in ...
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Canonical transformation and Hamilton's equations

I was trying to prove, that for a transformation to be Canonical, one must have a relationship: $$ \left\{ Q_a,P_i \right\} = \delta_{ai} $$ Where $Q_a = Q_a(p_i,q_i)$ and $P_a = P_a(p_i,q_i)$. Now ...
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Writing $\dot{q}$ in terms of $p$ in the Hamiltonian formulation

In the Hamiltonian formulation, we make a Legendre transformation of the Lagrangian and it should be written in terms of the coordinates $q$ and momentum $p$. Can we always write $dq/dt$ in terms of ...
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Group of symmetries of Lagrange's equations

Consider the following statements, for a classical system whose configuration space has dimension $d$: Lagrange equations admit a smaller group of "symmetries" (coordinate change under which ...
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98 views

Commutation for constraints

Suppose from the Hamiltonian I got the Primary constraints $$(\Phi_m,\Phi)$$ And $\dot \Phi_m$ , $\dot \Phi$ leads to secondary constraints $$(\gamma_m,\gamma)$$ respectively. Now if the commutation ...
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First class and second class constraints

Hello I am working on a project that involves the constraints. I checkout the paper of Dirac about the constraints as well as some other resources. But still confuse about the first class and second ...
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Operator Ordering Ambiguities

I have been told that $$[\hat x^2,\hat p^2]=2i\hbar (\hat x\hat p+\hat p\hat x)$$ illustrates operator ordering ambiguity. What does that mean? I tried googling but to no avail.
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Connections of iterative solvers for large systems of equation in Physics?

I am trying to find the domains in physics where solving large systems of equations is computationally expensive. The sparse systems are of my particular interest, where the input matrix A is in GBs ...
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Poisson brackets: prove that they are canonical invariants

EDIT: I haven't forgotten to accept answer, the question is still open.. I need a clarification about Poisson brackets. I'm studying on Goldstein's Classical Mechanics (1 ed.). Goldstein proves ...
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Potential Energy tends to infinity on the N-Body Problem

I need help to solve this problem related with the N-Body problem, i dont understand quite well what I need to define or to express in order to solve it. We assume a particular solution to the N-Body ...
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Why the Hamiltonian and the Lagrangian are used interchangeably in QFT perturbation calculations

Whenever one needs to calculate correlation functions in QFT using perturbations one encounters the following expression: $\langle 0| some\ operators \times \exp(iS_{(t)}) |0\rangle$ where, ...
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Why don't we use the concept of force in quantum mechanics?

I'm a quarter of the way towards finishing a basic quantum mechanics course, and I see no mention of force, after having done the 1-D Schrodinger equation for a free particle, particle in an ...
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What makes an equation an 'equation of motion'?

Every now and then, I find myself reading papers/text talking about how this equation is a constraint but that equation is an equation of motion which satisfies this constraint. For example, in the ...
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Lagrangian to Hamiltonian in Quantum Field Theory

While deriving Hamiltonian from Lagrangian density, we use the formula $$\mathcal{H} ~=~ \pi \dot{\phi} - \mathcal{L}.$$ But since we are considering space and time as parameters, why the formula ...
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325 views

Relativistic Hamiltonian Formulations [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Hamiltonian mechanics and special relativity? The Hamiltonian formulation is beautifully symmetric. It's a shame that the explicit time derivatives in Hamilton's ...
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Non-Integrable systems

Integrable systems are systems which have $2n-1$ time-independent, functionally independent conserved quantities (n being the number of degrees of freedom), or n whose Poisson brackets with each other ...
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Dirac equation as Hamiltonian system

Let us consider Dirac equation $$(i\gamma^\mu\partial_\mu -m)\psi =0$$ as a classical field equation. Is it possible to introduce Poisson bracket on the space of spinors $\psi$ in such a way that ...
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Is the geometric formulation of Hamiltonian mechanics really necessary? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is the symplectic manifold version of Hamiltonian mechanics used in Newtonian mechanics? I was sitting around with some friends the other day trying to come up with ...
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How to explain the different forms of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation?

In Arnold's Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, he derives the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (HJE) using a generating function $S_1(Q, q)$ to get $$ H\left(\frac{\partial S_1(Q, q)}{\partial q}, ...
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Deriving kinetic energy in cylindrical coordinate constraints

Consider a mass $m$ which is constrained to move on the frictionless surface of a vertical cone $\rho = cz$ (in cyclindrical polar coordinates $\rho, \theta, z$ with $z>0$) in a uniform ...
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Describing the movement of the object in a particular situation in Lagrangian way

Suppose there is a object M, (sliding motion) moving by the initial speed $v$ and the initial location $x_0$. Otherwise noted, friction is assumed to be nonexistent. It then meets a circular mold ...
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Quantizing first-class constraints for open algebras: can Hermiticity and noncommutativity coexist?

An open algebra for a collection of first-class constraints, $G_a$, $a=1,\cdots, r$, is given by the Poisson bracket $\{ G_a, G_b \} = {f_{ab}}^c[\phi] G_c$ classically, where the structure constants ...
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Relation between Dirac's generalized Hamiltonian dynamics method and path integral method to deal with constraints

What is the relation between path integral methods for dealing with constraints (constrained Hamiltonian dynamics involving non-singular Lagrangian) and Dirac's method of dealing with such systems ...
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ADM Hamiltonian formalism and Quantum gravity

is there a Hamiltonian reformultion of gravity ?=? if so if we use the usual Quantization scheme we can not we quantizy the gravity ?? in terms of a Gauge Theory with the potential $ A_{\mu}^{i} $ ...
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Hamiltonian Flow Map

I'm reading this article and am struggling with some of the terminology. What is the flow map for a Hamiltonian system? I'm looking for a rigorous definition really! Many thanks in advance.
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A good example of a nonlinear symplectomorphism?

What is a good example of a simple, physically useful nonlinear symplectomorphism $\kappa: \mathbb{R}^{2n} \rightarrow \mathbb{R}^{2n}$? I'm not much of a physicist, and all the examples I've worked ...
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239 views

Equivalence of classical and quantized equation of motion for a free field

Suppose a classical free field $\phi$ has a dynamic given in Poisson bracket form by $\partial_o\phi=\{H, \phi\}$. If we promote this field to an operator field, the dynamic after canonical ...
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What is the difference between manifest Lorentz invariance and canonical Lorentz invariance?

I often read that the Lorentz symmetry is manifest in the path integral formulation but is not in the canonical quantization - what does this really mean?
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An example of non-Hamiltonian systems

I am preparing for the exam. And I need to know the answer to one question which I can't understand. "Give an example of non-Hamiltonian systems: in case of infinite number of particles; for a finite ...
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558 views

Counting degrees of freedom in presence of constraints

In a $N$ dimensional phase space if I have $M$ 1st class and $S$ 2nd class constraints, then I have $N-2M-S$ degrees of freedom in phase space. How can I calculate the degrees of freedom in ...
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Dirac equation as canonical quantization?

First of all, I'm not a physicist, I'm mathematics phd student, but I have one elementary physical question and was not able to find answer in standard textbooks. Motivation is quite simple: let me ...
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Hamiltonian and the space-time structure

I'm reading Arnold's "Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics" but I failed to find rigorous development for the allowed forms of Hamiltonian. Space-time structure dictates the form of ...
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Advice on classes: Theoretical Mechanics vs E&M II

So I'm having a tough time deciding between courses next semester. I'm a rising 3rd year undergrad math major whose goal is to get a solid understanding of theoretical physics through advanced math ...
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Poisson structure comes from hamiltonian?

I am interested in studying quantization, but it seems I am lacking the basics of classical mechanics. Any help would be appreciated. I would first like to ask what is necessary to have a ...