The Hamiltonian formalism is a formalism in Classical Mechanics. Besides Lagrangian Mechanics, it is an effective way of reformulating classical mechanics in a simple way. Very useful in Quantum Mechanics, specifically the Heisenberg and Schrodinger formulations. Unlike Lagrangian ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

6
votes
2answers
79 views

Understanding Gibbs $H$-theorem: where does Jaynes' “blurring” argument come from?

According to this Wikipedia article, the $H$-theorem was Boltzmann's attempt to demonstrate the irreversible increase in entropy in a closed system starting from reversible microscopic mechanics. ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Poincaré surface of section of the Kicked Rotator [closed]

Wikipedia's article about the kicked rotator says that it's Hamiltonian is \begin{equation} H(p,q,t)=\frac{1}{2}p^2+K\cos(q)\sum_{n=-\infty}^{\infty}\delta(t-n) \end{equation} and it's Poincaré ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Are time-$t$ maps of a Hamiltonian system with 1 degree of freedom typically twist?

If we take a typical Hamiltonian system $H(q,p)$ with one degree of freedom, and look at its time-$1$ map $(q(0),p(0)) \mapsto (q(t),p(t))$, will it generically satisfy the twist property, e.g. ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

How to get the canonical momentum from the velocity when doing a Legendre transform?

For a Lagrangian $$L=\frac{1}{2}m\dot{q}^2-\frac{1}{2}m\omega^2 q^2$$ the Hamiltonian is defined as $$H=p\dot{q}-L$$ where $p$ is the canonical momentum, which is defined as $p=\frac{\partial ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

What is the Relationship Between Poisson Brackets and Additive Integrals of Motion?

Question in the title: what is the relationship, if any, between Poisson brackets and additive integrals of motion? Context: Is there anything we can say about additive integrals of motion in ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Slowly Varying Functions for Adiabatic Invariants - The Same as Karamata's?

In section 49 (and 50) of Landau and Lifschitz's "Classical Mechanics", adiabatic invariants are discussed, which are related to functions which vary adiabatically or "slowly" with time. Admittedly ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Hamilton's equations of motion on Dirac's formalism

I'm having several doubts about the procedure proposed by the Dirac-Bergmann algorithm in order to get the correct equations of motion of electrodynamics (Maxwell's equations). Suppose I've already ...
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

Deriving Ideal Gas law from Hamiltonian Mechanics

I just don't understand the explanation in Wikipedia. Is there a nice & elegant way of arriving at the Ideal Gas Law from Hamilton's Equations?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How can I prove that the Euler-Bernoulli beam PDE is Hamiltonian?

How can I prove that the Euler-Bernoulli beam PDE is Hamiltonian? I'm having trouble with the above. I have the Hamiltonian: how can I prove this is Hamiltonian in structure?
2
votes
2answers
60 views

General form for functional derivatives

Working on the hamiltonian formalism applied to canonical field theory, how do I deduce the general form for the functional derivatives $\frac{\delta}{\delta \pi}$ and $\frac{\delta}{\delta \phi}$ ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Doubts about Chern-Simons state as a solution of the Hamiltonian constraint in quantum gravity

I've been doing some work with both Baez's Knots, gauge fields and gravity (1) and Gambini, Pullin's Loops, knots, gauge Theories and quantum gravity (2), lately. I have basically two problems: I ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Regarding $f$ degrees of freedom & $f\!-\!1$ constants & inclusion of these constants

In the classic & famous book "Electromagnetic fields & Interactions" by Richard Becker (Dover publishing), on page 55 (of volume 2) , author says: If the system possesses f degrees of ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Hamiltonian or free energy corresponding to 2+1D Kuramoto-Sivashinsky model

I am trying to understand if the deterministic 2+1D Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation $$ \partial_t h = -\nu \nabla^2 h - K \nabla^4 h + \frac{\lambda}{2} (\nabla h)^2, $$ where $\nu$, $K$, $\lambda$ ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Intuition on Gibbs measures

I am (roughly) aware of the way Gibbs measures are used to solve physical systems (e.g. the Ising model). We can basically boil it down to pinpointing a Hamiltonian. My question is, consider a ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

Why don't people use Hamilton's equations for a relativistic free charged particle?

A charged relativistic free particle has the Hamiltonian in general: $$ \mathcal{H} = \sqrt{p^2c^2+m^2c^4}.$$ I read somewhere that says, it is possible to go further and say that the EoM are ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Build Hamiltonian function

Suppose we have three-point system Points A and B are connected with rod of fixed length $r_0$. Point C rotates around rod, vector R begins at rod's centre of mass. There is a potential of general ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

A Canonical Transformation that deletes one canonical coordinate?

I am self studying some classical mechanics, and came across a problem in Goldstein that has me stumped. It is problem 1 in chapter 10. It basically says "Given some conservative system show that a ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Spin Orbit Coupling Hamiltonians

I am really struggling with something fundamental. I keep coming across two versions of the hamiltonian for spin orbit coupling: $H_{soc}=\frac{\mu_B}{2c^2}(v \times E) \cdot \sigma $ $\mu_B =$ ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Hamiltonian from a differential equation

In my differential equations course an example is given from the Lotka-Volterra system of equations: $$ x'=x-xy$$ $$y'=-\gamma y+xy.\tag{1}$$ This is then transformed by the substitution: $q=\ln x, ...
2
votes
0answers
73 views

Quantization of non-variational systems?

In undergraduate courses the introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics usually starts from a Newtonian view point. One has equations of motions of the form (not sure if it is ok to use covariant notation ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Deriving Hamilton's equations from KdV Hamiltonian

Let $f=f(q,p)$, $g=g(q,p)$ and Possion bracket $$\{f,g\}=\frac{\partial f}{\partial q}\frac{\partial g}{\partial p}-\frac{\partial f}{\partial p}\frac{\partial g}{\partial q}. \tag{1}$$ Then ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Meaning of centrifugal term in the mechanical energy of a orbiting planet [duplicate]

For a planet under the effect of gravitational force the mechanical energy can be written as $$E=\frac{1}{2}\mu {\dot{r}}^2+\frac{L^2}{2\mu r^2}-\gamma \frac{m M}{r^2} \tag{1}$$ Where $\mu$ is the ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Show that Newtonian orbits are closed and periodic

I want to prove to show that the change of the rotation angle of a body in a two-body-problem is exactly $\Delta \phi = 2\pi$. I know that the whole energy of the system is given by $$ E = ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Possible duality between Harmonic oscillator and free particle?

There is some connection between classical non-interacting harmonic oscillator (OH) and the free particle in higher dimensions? I was studying statistical mechanics and I came across the idea that ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Non-null hessian condition for regular dynamical systems

I'm "researching" on unquantised Yang-Mills theory. For that I'm studying the Dirac's method for singular constrained systems and having problems to follow the first considerations on that matter. I ...
8
votes
2answers
218 views

How do derivative couplings affect canonical quantization?

Consider a Lagrangian for a scalar field $\phi$ with an interaction term $$\mathcal{L}_{int} = (\partial^2 \phi)^2 \phi.$$ Here I'm suppressing all indices for brevity. Now, this is just a ...
6
votes
1answer
105 views

Hamiltonian and Energy of a charged particle in an Electromagnetic field

The Lagrangian of a charged particle of charge $e$ moving in an electromagnetic field is given by $$L=\frac{1}{2}m\dot{\textbf{r}}^2-e\phi-e\textbf{A}\cdot \textbf{v}$$ where $\phi(\textbf{r},t)$ is ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Build rotational Hamiltonian based on Lagrangian of general form

I've been told that one could build rotational Hamiltonian based on Lagrangian of general form: $\mathcal{L} = \mathcal{L} (\vec{\Omega})$. By introducing Euler angles one could rewrite Lagrangian in ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

In what cases do we use the Routh Function? [duplicate]

As many of you, I studied Lagrangian Mechanics and Hamiltonian Mechanics, with the so famous functions called Lagrangian $\mathcal{L}$ and Hamiltonian $\mathcal{H}$ related by: $$\mathcal{H}(q_i, ...
4
votes
1answer
60 views

Usage of total time derivative within first Euler-Lagrange equation

As one key argument in Introductoryt QM Class, we've been taught to use a Lagrangian and Hamiltonian generalized description of a dynamic systems, which follows the Euler-Lagrange or Hamilton equation ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Non-holonomic constraints in Dirac-Bergmann theory

The Dirac-Bergmann algorithm effectively isolates the physical degrees of freedom of a system, by changing from Poisson brackets $\{\cdot,\cdot\}_\mathrm{PB}$ to Dirac brackets ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Classical Field Theory: Physical meaning of various terms in total Hamiltonian

In a classical field theory problem Lagrangian density is given as $${\cal L}=\frac{1}{2}\dot{\phi }^{2}-\frac{1}{2}\left ( \bigtriangledown \phi \right )^{2}-\frac{1}{2}m^{2}\phi ^{2}\tag{2.6}$$ ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Coordinates from action-angle variables

I'm interested into getting the original coordinates, $q(t)$ and $p(t)$, from the action, $J=\oint p dq$, and angle, $w(t)=\frac{dH}{dJ}t+\beta$, variables for a 1-D, one particle system. I know that ...
3
votes
0answers
63 views

How do I obtain the SUSY Transformations from Poisson Brackets?

In Friedman's and Van Proyen's Supergravity textbook it is explained how one can get the supersymmetry transformations using the conserved currents. Specifically this is in section 6 where we are ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

kinetic energy in analytical mechanics

I have a question about the derivation of kinetic energy in analytical mechanics. What is the physical diffrence bettwen the 3 components (T0 T1 and T2), and when should we use those components ...
4
votes
0answers
54 views

Motivation for covariant phase space

The covariant phase space idea, in one sentence, is that there is a natural symplectic structure on the space of the classical trajectories of a system and that the usual $(q,p)$ coordinates just ...
4
votes
2answers
133 views

Does the conservation of the Wronskian follow from Noether's principle?

Noether's principle is the paradigm that symmetries of Hamiltonian and Lagrangian systems correspond to conservation laws of various kinds. Consider a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator $$\tag{*} ...
3
votes
2answers
119 views

Finding geodesics: Lagrangian vs Hamiltonian

I have a question referring to how to compute geodesics of a given spacetime (say, Kerr). I know that the direct way is via the geodesic equation ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Statistical Physics of a System with Friction inside a Hot Bath

If you have a classical system (i.e obeying Newton's equations of motion) with Hamiltonian $H(x,p) = \frac{p^2}{2m} + U(x)$ then the statistical behaviour of this system is described by the ...
4
votes
4answers
596 views

Why is the Lagrangian approach preferred over the Hamiltonian approach in QFT? [duplicate]

Going from non-relativistic quantum mechanics(QM) to QFT there is a marked change in the approach used. QM almost exclusively uses Hamiltonains. Lagrangian based methods like the path-integrals are ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Classical particle in a box [closed]

I'm trying to work out some of the details for this system. A particle with mass $\mu$, initial velocity $v_0$ at $x_0$ and moving freely between two walls located at $\pm L/2$, with which it bounces ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

What does Liouville's Theorem actually mean?

Basically, the mathematical statement of Liouville's theorem is: $$\frac{\partial \rho }{\partial t}= -\sum_{i}\left(\frac{\partial \rho}{\partial q_i}\,\dot{q_i}+\frac{\partial\rho}{\partial ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Hamilton's equations of motion

One of hamilton's equations is $(\frac{\partial H}{\partial q} )_t = -(\frac{\partial p}{\partial t}) _q$. But isn't it $\frac{\partial L}{\partial q} = \frac{dp}{dt}$? If H = L(i.e. V = 0), what ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

How does this quantisation relation come about?

I'm currently doing a course in string theory and in the lecture notes it is stated: $$ [x^-, p^+]~=~-i \tag{1}$$ I am fine with this. However, after trying (and failing) a question, I looked at ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

How to scale variables in a classical Hamiltonian?

So I looked at some research articles where one has a classical Hamiltonian $H(p,q,t) = p^{2}/2 + V(q,t)$. If one introduces the scaling transformation $$t \mapsto t/\sqrt{s}, \quad H \mapsto Hs, ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Why are the integrability conditions necessary and sufficient for the existence of a canonical transformation's generating function?

Consider a canonical transformation $(p,q) \rightarrow (P,Q)$ under a generating function $F$. The condition for form invariance of Hamiltonian equations of motion looks like : $$\sum_{s}P_s\dot{Q_s} ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Phase Portraits Given Hamiltonian

Given a Hamiltonian say $$ H = 5p^2 $$ What is the correct procedure for producing a phase portrait. My initial thoughts were to solve the system of equations $\frac{dq}{dt} = 0$ and $\frac{dp}{dt} ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Counting number of degrees of freedom in constrained system

Following Counting degrees of freedom in presence of constraints, we know that there would be N-2M-S dofs if we have M 1st-class constraints and S 2nd-class constraints in N-dim phase space. I don't ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Canonical Transformation [duplicate]

How can I prove that the following transformation is canonical: $\begin{cases}\overline{q}_i=\dfrac{q_i}{Q} \\ \overline{p}_i=Qp_i-2Pq_i \end{cases},\ i\in\overline{1,n}$ where $Q=\sum_{i=1}^n ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Recovering a symmetry transformation from a conserved charge

I'm going through some notes on how to apply the Hamiltonian formalism to systems with gauge invariance and I found a derivation of Noether's theorem I had never seen before. The idea is roughly that ...