The central term in the hamiltonian formalism. Can be interpreted as an energy input, or "true" energy.

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Minimum gap between consecutive energy levels?

Assume a standard one-particle, non-relativistic Hamiltonian of the form \begin{equation} H=\frac{p^2}{2m}+V(r) \end{equation} and denote its eigenvalues as $E_{n,\tau}$, where $n$ is the principal ...
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4answers
468 views

Is it possible to reconstruct the Hamiltonian from knowledge of its ground state wave function?

Is it possible to "construct" the Hamiltonian of a system if its ground state wave function (or functional) is known? I understand one should not expect this to be generically true since the ...
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33 views

Does the unboundedness of the potential mean necessarily there is no normalizable state? [closed]

Consider the Hamiltonian $ H = p^2 + V(x)$. Suppose the potential $V$ is unbounded from below in at least one direction ($x \rightarrow \pm \infty $). Does this necessarily mean that there exists no ...
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47 views

Normalizable eigenvectors of the inverted harmonic oscillator

Consider the inverted harmonic potential $V(x) = - x^2 $. Does the corresponding Hamiltonian $$ H = p^2 - x^2 $$ have any normalizable eigenstate? How about $$ H = p^2 - x^4 ? $$ Any good ...
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34 views

Systems with extensive ground state degeneracy

This is sort of a follow up to this question: What does it mean for a Hamiltonian or system to be gapped or gapless? There it is stated in one of the answers that a system is gapped if it fulfills ...
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1answer
81 views

When is a quantum state stationary?

If a quantum state is an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian, then it is stationary. But can a state be stationary if it is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian? If yes, how can one prove whether a state is ...
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1answer
42 views

Using Dyson formula in Schrodinger picture

From Time-ordering and Dyson series and what I learnt, Dyson formula is used in the situation of interaction picture: $$i\frac{dU_I}{dt} = H_{I}(t)U_I$$ where $H_I(t)$ is interaction Hamiltonian ...
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1answer
58 views

Quantum Mechanics: Relate solutions for two dual hamiltonians?

Consider a Hamiltonian in quantum mechanics: $$H_x=-\frac{d^2}{dx^2}+V(x,c)$$ where $x\in\mathbb{R}$ and the potential $V(x,c)$ depends on position $x$ and a continuous parameter $c$. Furthermore, ...
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679 views

Increasing a potential causes increase in energy levels

Suppose a potential $V(x)$, and suppose a bound particle so the allowed energy levels are discrete. Suppose a second potential $\widetilde{V}(x)$ such that $\widetilde{V}(x) \geq V(x)$ for all $x$ (...
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1answer
113 views

Why are general wave functions expressed in terms of energy eigenfunctions?

I have read that the eigenfunctions of any hermitian operator can be used as a basis to express any function, but I have only ever really seen the eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian used. Why is this? ...
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1answer
38 views

Converting the Hamiltonian for the tight binding model in silicene into $k$ space

I am trying to convert the Hamiltonian from the paper "A topological insulator and helical zero mode in silicene under an inhomogeneous electric field" (also on arXiv) into $k$ space. $$H = -t\sum_{\...
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17 views

Properties of non-commuting (and particularly anti-commuting) operators

The commutator of 2 operators describes in some sense "how much" do they commute or actually its more about "how far" are they from commuting. The case where the commutator of 2 operators (say ...
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1answer
67 views

How to find the corresponding Hamiltonian in quantum, if Hamiltonian in classical mechanics is given? [closed]

Hamiltonian in classical mechanics is $$H=wxp $$ $x=$ position, $p=$ momentum coordinate. Find the corresponding Hamiltonian in quantum mechanics!
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1answer
22 views

Adding an external magnetic field to the Ising model Hamiltonian

If I take the evolution of the Hamiltonian of the Ising model in terms of the Pauli operators, i.e. $\exp(-it(\sigma^z_i\otimes\sigma^z_j)/\hbar)$ where $\sigma_i$, $\sigma_j$ are the Pauli operators ...
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20 views

Eigen energy of the Landau levels in a tilted magnetic field

The problem pertains to a fermi gas in a tilted magnetic field confined by a harmonic potential in the z direction. I chose the vector potential $(0,ax-bz,0)$. I obtain the following hamiltonain with ...
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1answer
36 views

How can one determine whether two given Hamiltonians are supersymmetric partners?

Given two Hamiltonians in a general form of second order differential equations, how do I find out if they are SUSY partners or not? Given the factorisation of a Hamiltonian in the form of $a^\dagger ...
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0answers
71 views

How to plot numerically the wave functions according to the Hamiltonian?

It is often difficult to analytically solve the Schrodinger equation, and so we need to obtain a solution numerically. An example plot is shown below. Here, the wave functions for a three junction ...
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1answer
34 views

Bohr frequency of an expectation value?

Consider a two-state system with a Hamiltonian defined as \begin{bmatrix} E_1 &0 \\ 0 & E_2 \end{bmatrix} Another observable, $A$, is given (in the same basis) by \begin{bmatrix} 0 &a \...
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1answer
22 views

Zeeman effect - eigenstates and its degeneracy - with and without magnetic field

Consider a hydrogen atom in a homogeneous magnetic field $\vec{B}=B\vec{e_z}$. Using the coulomb gauge ($\nabla \vec{A}=0$) we can take $\vec{A}=\frac{1}{2}\vec{B}\times \vec{r}$ as a vector potential....
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1answer
38 views

Relationship Between Magnetic Dipole Moment and Spin Angular Momentum

I am reading Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 1st edition by David J. Griffiths and I have a couple questions about this section on page 160. A spinning charged particle constitutes a magnetic ...
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1answer
94 views

Is there any Hamiltonian that contains time derivative? [duplicate]

Quantum mechanics is governed by Schrodinger's equation: $$\hat{H}\psi=i\hbar\partial_t \psi$$ It seems that Hamiltonian acts on wave functions like a time derivative. Just out of curiosity, is ...
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1answer
60 views

Hamiltonian - Fourier transform of order parameter [closed]

I have a rather simple task, but it seems I can't move forward with the solution. I have a Hamiltonian as seen in the picture. I have to use the Fourier transform of the order parameter $\phi(x)$ and ...
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1answer
66 views

Does the Hamiltonian time-evolution operator actually change the state of the system?

According to my understanding of things, the time evolution operator in QM looks something like this, $$U = \exp(-iHt/\hbar)$$ Which acts on the state vector / wave-function of the system to ...
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1answer
40 views

Does an odd potential commute with parity operator?

I can prove when a Hamiltonian commute with the partity operator if the potential is even. But what about an odd potential? my understanding is that the parity operator mirrors the coordinate system, ...
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45 views

Derivation involving finite unitary transformation [closed]

Hi I just want to confirm a short derivation involving a particular finite unitary transformation which is important in QM. My working is as follows: Given the finite unitary transformation defined ...
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1answer
49 views

Energy conservation and time translations

The time translation is given by a finite unitary transformation $$\hat{U_{\tau}}(\hat{H}) = e^{\big(\frac{i}{\hbar}\tau \bar{H}\big)}.$$ Where $$\hat{U_{\tau}}(\hat{H})|\psi(t) \rangle = |\psi(t-\tau)...
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29 views

Finding the initial state in the power method for Hamiltonian diagonalization

In section III of the lecture note Chapter 1: Exact Diagonalization, Weimer has described the Power method for Hamiltonian diagonalization. The process requires the choice of an random initial state ...
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1answer
39 views

how many can we build a set of eigenbasis which describes arbitrary physical system?

Suppose Hamiltonian $H\phi = E\phi$. we can choose eigenstates of Hamiltonian by finding operator $A$ which is $[A,H] = 0$. Does it means that every operator which commutes with $H$ can have same ...
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1answer
57 views

Why does time-independent Hamiltonian not depend on angle variable?

In Landau and Lifshitz Mechanics, $\S50$ Canonical variables a time-independent Hamiltonian is considered, and a canonical transformation is done such that adiabatic invariant $I$ becomes the new ...
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1answer
53 views

Representing Hamiltonian in discrete position basis

I am trying to numerically find eigenstates of an Hamiltonian. Let $V(x)$ be some potential. Suppose my space is between $-L,L$ and that the allowed positions are every $\Delta x$, such that $\frac{1}{...
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1answer
122 views

Ground state energy of spin 1 particle

So I have this Hamiltonian for a particle with spin 1: $$ H=aS_{z}^2+\frac{\hbar\omega}{\sqrt2}S_{x}$$ where ($a$ and $\omega$ both real constants): $$ S_{z}=\hbar\begin{pmatrix} 1 & 0 & 0 \...
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1answer
40 views

Why the constancy of an observable w.r.t time depends on whether it commutes with $H$ or not?

I have been reading Modern Quantum Mechanics by J.J.Sakurai. Under the chapter Quantum Dynamics, the author says if an observable $A$ initially commutes with the Hamiltonian operator $H$, then it ...
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1answer
39 views

How to check if a Hamiltonian is PT symmetric or not?

Consider the Hamiltonian $$H=p^2+ix^3+ix.$$ This paper by Carl M bender claims this is a $PT$ symmetric Hamiltonian. In this he describes $PT$ symmetry as parity $P$, whose effect is to make ...
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51 views

Gaining intuition over Hamiltonian for qubit systems

A typical Hamiltonian for a two state system with some driving field can be written as $$H=J(t)\sigma_z+h\sigma_x$$ This represents a qubit system driven along a single axis. On the other hand we ...
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1answer
52 views

Why is the energy operator special?

Only the energy operator controls the time dependence of a quantum system, but not the others, why is that?
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Meaning of Hamiltonian between two different states

If we have states $\left | 1 \right>$ and $\left | 2 \right>$, and the Hamiltonian operator $\hat{H}$, what is the meaning of the expression $$\left< 1 \right | \hat{H} \left | 2 \right >$$...
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1answer
47 views

Momentum operator in effective mass approximation

When we calculate the band structure of some solid then we often find that in the bottom of the conduction band the dispersion looks approximately quadratic with some new effective mass: $$E(k) = \...
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24 views

What is Loewdin downfolding method?

I am a student in solid state physics. I wonder if somebody could explain the mathematical background of downfolding method that is often used by Ole K. Anderson. Which restriction (conditions) to ...
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0answers
35 views

Is expectation value of the Hamiltonian always the energy? [duplicate]

There are time dependent & space dependent systems (magnetic fields) and time independent (particle in a box or harmonic oscillator). In the latter the expectation value is the 'average' energy ...
4
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2answers
106 views

Is the eigenvalue of Hamiltonian invariant under linear transformation of momentum operator?

It is given The dynamics of a particle moving one-dimensionally in a potential V(x) is governed by the Hamiltonian $H_0 = p^2 /2m + V(x) $, where $p = -i\hbar d/dx$ is the momentum operator. ...
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75 views

Bogoliubov transformation with two pairing terms

Let us assume that we have a Hamiltonian of the form: $$ H = \sum_{k,\sigma,s}\epsilon_{\sigma s}\left(k\right)c_{k\sigma s}^{\dagger}c_{k\sigma s} + \sum_{k,s}\Delta_{0}\left(k\right)c_{k\uparrow s}^...
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43 views

Build Hamiltonian function

Suppose we have three-point system Points A and B are connected with rod of fixed length $r_0$. Point C rotates around rod, vector R begins at rod's centre of mass. There is a potential of general ...
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17 views

Fermi-level of lattice model

I have a chain of $N$ lattice points with periodic boundary conditions. Every lattice point only has one orbital for an electron to occupy and spin is not included for simplicity. The lattice points ...
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2answers
52 views

Quantization of the Hamiltonian of a particle in a uniform magnetic field

If a particle of mass $m$ and charge $q$ is subject to a uniform magnetic field and if we have a vector potential $\mathbf{A}$ then we know that classically the dynamics of the particle will be ...
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1answer
82 views

Single particle tunneling Hamiltonian

In reference to Problem 9, Chapter 2 in Modern Quantum Mechanics by JJ Sakurai, For a single particle tunneling in a 1D double well potential, with position eigenkets $\mid R\rangle$, $\mid L\rangle$....
1
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1answer
73 views

Going to the interaction picture in the Jaynes–Cummings model [closed]

In the Jaynes–Cummings model for a two level atom, the Hamiltonian for the atom is defined as (I let $\bar{h}=1$) $$H_a=\omega_a\frac{\sigma_z}{2}$$ and the field Hamiltonian is $$H_f=\omega_ca^{\...
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2answers
222 views

What is $\langle \phi | H | \psi \rangle$ in QM?

I know that $\langle \phi | \psi \rangle$ is the probability of going from the $\psi$-state to the $\phi$-state, and that $\langle \phi | H | \phi \rangle$ is the expectation value of the energy for ...
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23 views

Can you help me solve this using the current value Hamiltonian? [closed]

Okay, so I am getting a little stuck on this question, I will post it and then tell you how far I get. $$ max - \int_0^2 (x^2 + u^2)e^{-0.03t}dt\, $$ $$ x' = x-2u $$ $$ x(0) = 3 $$ $$ x(2)free $$ ...
3
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2answers
125 views

Why do we need both Hamiltonian and Hilbert Space to specify a Quantum System?

From my understanding, when we have the Hamiltonian, in principle we can know the eigenstates for our system of interest. Then, we can calculate everything we want. In addition, these eigenstates ...
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1answer
113 views

Hamiltonian and Energy of a charged particle in an Electromagnetic field

The Lagrangian of a charged particle of charge $e$ moving in an electromagnetic field is given by $$L=\frac{1}{2}m\dot{\textbf{r}}^2-e\phi-e\textbf{A}\cdot \textbf{v}$$ where $\phi(\textbf{r},t)$ is ...