Group theory is a branch of abstract algebra. A group is a set of objects, together with a binary operation, that satisfies four axioms. The set must be closed under the operation and contain an identity object. Every object in the set must have an inverse, and the operation must be associative. ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
32 views

Representations of spinors

I'm trying to understand spinors but I haven't found a good explanation of how to derive them. I'm generally interested. I read that there is a representation of SO(3) as spinors, and also that there ...
1
vote
2answers
893 views

Weyl exponential form of the Canonical Commutation Relations

What is the physical meaning of the $c$-numbers $Q, P\in \mathbb{R}$ in the exponent of the Weyl system $\exp\left[\frac{i}{\hbar} Q \hat{p}\right]$ and $\exp\left[\frac{i}{\hbar}P\hat{q}\right]$? ...
3
votes
1answer
186 views

Quadratic Casimir operator of higher dimensional $\mathfrak{su}(3)$ representations

In higher dimensional representations of $\mathfrak{su(3)}$, what will be the quadratic Casimir operator? Is it same as in lower dimensions or different?
2
votes
0answers
51 views

Use Cartan subalgebra in spinor representation to find weights of vector representation

For $SO(2n)$ we can construct the lie algebra elements by using antisymmetric combinations of $\gamma_\mu$ which obey the Clifford algebra. Up to some prefactor the elements $ S_{\mu \nu} = \alpha ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Generators of cubic group: Euler angles [on hold]

I am trying to build numerically all members of the cubic group in the representation of Wigner D matrices. Angular-momentum quantum number may be small, e.g. 2, so I use the formula stated e.g. at ...
3
votes
1answer
206 views

Why is the projective symmetry group (PSG) called projective?

As discussed by Prof.Wen in the context of the quantum orders of spin liquids, PSG is defined as all the transformations that leave the mean-field ansatz invariant, IGG is the so-called invariant ...
6
votes
1answer
436 views

What exactly is the connection between gauge transformations and symmetry groups?

For a given gauge transformation, say, the electromagnetic field, where observable quantities aren't affected by transformations of the form $$\mathbf{A}' = \mathbf{A} + \nabla \chi,$$ $$\phi' = \phi ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Implication of rotational symmetry on scattering matrix/ scattering cross-section [closed]

How does the rotational invariance helps simplifying Non-relativistic quantum scattering problems? Is there any any additional information that can be extracted about the scattering amplitude? It ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Susy transformation for gauge multiplet

How can the supersymmetrie transformation $\delta A_\mu = \frac{1}{2} \overline{\epsilon}\gamma_\mu \psi $ be derived from the susy algebra ( or group ). Where $ (A_\mu , \psi)$ are in a gauge ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Books on representation theory [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Best books for mathematical background? I'm looking for a textbook on the group/representation theory for a student-physicist. The main questions of interest are ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Simple concept question about the dimensionality of a representation in point group

Concept question about the dimensionality of a representation in group theory here: Look at 3.1(c) of problem set, from group theory application to the physics of condensed matter of M.S.Dresselhaus: ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Conjugate elements of $SO(3)$ group [migrated]

Composition of two rotations in 3d space yields another rotation $$R_1 R_2 = R_3, $$ and I can understand this by help of some figures in my book. So, the rotations in 3d space forms group. Then ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

Symmetry and Group theory book

I would like to start learning about symmetries in physics and how they affect physical quantities. As far as I know, the mathematical language that describes symmetries is the Group Theory. So, I ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Mesons and Young Tableaux

I need some help conecting Young Tableaux with actual particles. I think I have some feel for using Young Tableaux for instance: a baryon in SU(3) where the states are u,d,s can be represented by ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Do tensor product tables for irreducible representations apply for non-symmorphic space groups?

I'm reading Dresselhaus's book on group theory for solid-state physics, but I'm having trouble understanding how to get irreducible representations for phonons away from $\mathbf{k} = \mathbf{0}$ for ...
3
votes
1answer
266 views

Does the low-energy gauge structure depend on the choice of $SU(2)$ gauge freedom?

The starting point and notations used here are presented in Two puzzles on the Projective Symmetry Group(PSG)?. As we know, Invariant Gauge Group(IGG) is a normal subgroup of Projective Symmetry ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

How to build tetra-quark mesons symmetry group?

I was thinking about the issue while reviewing my group theory notes. One can construct mesons with a nonet as an octet and a singlet, $SU(3)\otimes SU(3) = 8\oplus \bar{1}$. In a same way but for ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

Invariant tensors in a general representation and their physical meaning

I'm trying to use tensor methods to find invariant elements of representations. Specifically I'm looking at representations of $SU(5)$. I can show that the invariant element in $5\otimes\bar{5}$ (or ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Is it proper definition of the free motion? The orbit of free motion is a free group [closed]

That's what I wrote in my notes but I don't understand this definition, I've studied group theory but free groups were not included. Can someone explain this definition, please?
0
votes
1answer
153 views

Coordinate system for crystallographic groups

In the International Tables for Crystallography for each crystallographic group an asymmetric unit is supplied (mathematicians call this a fundamental domain of the group). This region is a bounded ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Why is there no 1/3 spin? [duplicate]

Why do no particles have a 1/3 spin? Why are all particles' spin either a half-integer or integer? How would a particle with such a spin behave, as a fermion, boson, or neither?
16
votes
1answer
542 views

How to evaluate this sum of coupling coefficients?

I would like to evaluate the following summation of Clebsch-Gordan and Wigner 6-j symbols in closed form: $$\sum_{l,m} C_{l_2,m_2,l_1,m_1}^{l,m} C_{\lambda_2,\mu_2,\lambda_1,\mu_1}^{l,m} \left\{ ...
4
votes
0answers
39 views

What is $\mathrm{U(1)}$ vector and axial?

In hadron physics we talked about $\mathrm{U(1)_V}$ (vector) and $\mathrm{U(1)_A}$ (axial) as well as $\mathrm{SU(3)_L}$ (left) and $\mathrm{SU(3)_R}$ (right). There are certain relations between them ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

Mathematical definition of reversible processes

If I label an initial thermodynamic state as $\psi$ and the final thermodynamic state as $\xi$ then can I say that under a reversible process the two states are related to each other by a continuous ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

How to normalize matrix representations properly?

In the convention, where the Dynkin index $Tr(T_a T_b)$ of the lowest-dimensional representation is $\frac{1}{2} \delta_{ab}$, how can I normalize a given set of matrices properly? For example, given ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Lorentz group in SUSY

Why do we carry Lorentz group to be included also in supersymmetry? That is after we extend our symmetry to supersymmetry, we carry with us the Lorentz group. Why not other group instead?
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Is it possible to define a symmetry group for the Einstein metric?

I was just wondering if there exists a group of transformations that act on the metric such that the EFE are invariant. At first I thought it would be the group of 2nd roots of unity. That is, the set ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

The anticommutator of $SU(N)$ generators

For the Hermitian and traceless generators $T^A$ of the fundamental representation of the $SU(N)$ algebra the anticommutator can be written as $$ \{T^A,T^{B}\} = \frac{2N}{d}\delta^{AB}\cdot1_{d} + ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is spin angular momentum conserved?

According to the Noether theorem, we only have the conserved quantity $$J+S,$$ where $J$ is the orbital angular momentum and $S$ is the spin angular momentum. But I am always impressed that the spin ...
3
votes
2answers
75 views

AdS/CFT Group Theory

I have a two part question about AdS/CFT: Is the only necessary ingredient that the isometry group of AdS matches the conformal group in one dimension less or are there other prerequisites to build ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

How to introduce symmetry of particles to a layperson? [closed]

I want to introduce the concept of special unitary symmetry and how it is important in particle physics to a layperson. Without being technical, is there a way to explain the fundamental concept?
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Direct Sum representation of multiple particles in Quantum Mechanics

Suppose that I have three non-interacting spin-1/2 particles such that I can represent the combined system in a basis of \begin{align} D^{(1/2)}_1 \otimes D^{(1/2)}_2 \otimes D^{(1/2)}_3 & ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Poincare group representation and complete set

In Weinberg's book of Qft, chapter 2 of volume 1, he uses the eigenstates of the four-momentum to construct the unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare group. My question is, since ...
19
votes
1answer
3k views

How do I construct the $SU(2)$ representation of the Lorentz Group using $SU(2)\times SU(2)\sim SO(3,1)$ ?

This question is based on problem II.3.1 in Anthony Zee's book Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell Show, by explicit calculation, that $(1/2,1/2)$ is the Lorentz Vector. I see that the ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Enhancing the QED $U(1)$ gauge symmetry

QED is a gauge theory based on $U(1)$ gauge symmetry, which gives rise to photon as the gauge boson mediating the interaction. Mathematically, I think it is perfectly allowed to implement a ...
4
votes
1answer
121 views

Why are one-particle states called representations of Poincaré group?

The one-particle states in the Hilbert space of a quantized relativistic field theory are said to form representations of the Poincaré group. Why is that? I mean, popular texts in QFT do not ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Correct Yukawa Term with a SU(2) Higgs Triplet?

Given $SU(2)$ doublet fermions $\Psi^1$ and $\Psi^2$ and a $SU(2)$ triplet Higgs $H$, how does the correct Yukawa term look like in tensor notation? Schematically, we have $$ 2 \otimes 2 \otimes 3 ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Charge Conjugation for $SU(N)$?

For $SU(2)$ the charge conjugation operator $C$ reads explicitly $$ C \Psi = i \sigma_2 \Psi^\star ,$$ where $\sigma_2$ is a Pauli matrix. What is the generalized charge conjugation for $SU(N)$?
1
vote
1answer
45 views

determining electrostatic field using only symmetries

As an exercise, I'm trying to (rigorously) determine as much as possible about the electrostatic field due to a infinite line of charge (along the z-axis) without using Maxwell's equations or any of ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Spacetime as a coset of a symmetry group

In the introduction to his nice PNAS paper on symmetry, David Gross said Einstein’s great advance in 1905 was to put symmetry first, to regard the symmetry principle as the primary feature of ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Diffeomorphism group vs. $GL(4,\mathbb{R})$ in General Relativity

I am quite confused with the groups Diff$(M)$ and $GL(4,\mathbb{R})$ in the context of general relativity. I understand that the symmetries of GR are the transformations that leave the equations ...
7
votes
3answers
432 views

Why is $\theta \over 2$ used for a Bloch sphere instead of $\theta$?

I'm a beginner in studying quantum info, and I'm a little confused about the representation of a qubit with a Bloch Sphere. Wikipedia says that we can use $$\lvert\Psi\rangle=\cos\frac{\theta}{2} ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Space group setting of a crystal structure

I was reading a PDF of a crystal phase in order to draw its structure, when I noticed that it was, apparently, ambiguously described. The PDF lists two descriptions of the monoclinic structure: 1) ...
4
votes
3answers
69 views

In most physical cases, the elements of a group can be represented by unitary matrices. Why no time-reversal?

In Dresselhaus's group theory page 19, a theorem writes: Every representation (of a Hamitonian's group) with matrices having non-vanishing determinants can be brought into unitary form by an ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

spin representations and polynomials

I'm reading Group Theory and General Relativity by Moshe Carmeli and his discussion of spin representations of SU(2) and the isomorphism to the space of homogenous polynomials is confusing me. I'll ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Matrices belonging to orthochronous Lorentz group

My Professor says that all members of the orthochronous Lorentz group may be written as $e^\Gamma$, where $$ \Gamma^{\mu}_{\nu}=\Lambda^{\mu \rho} \eta_{\rho \nu}$$ Here $\Lambda$ is an antisymmetric ...
10
votes
2answers
429 views

Vector spaces for the irreducible representations of the Lorentz Group

EDIT: The vector space for the $(\frac{1}{2},0)$ Representation is $\mathbb{C}^2$ as mentioned by Qmechanic in the comments to his answer below! The vector spaces for the other representations remain ...
5
votes
0answers
55 views

$(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ and $(\frac{1}{2},0)\bigoplus (0,\frac{1}{2})$ [duplicate]

I am confused about the notation. What's the differences between $(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ and $(\frac{1}{2},0)\bigoplus (0,\frac{1}{2})$, or maybe $(\frac{1}{2},0)\bigoplus (\frac{1}{2},0)$ ? ...
5
votes
1answer
210 views

Is a $SU(2)$ supergauge theory really a $SU(2)$ gauge theory?

Consider $SU(2)$ supergauge theory with $A$, a doublet of two chiral superfields in the fundamental representation. $$A= \begin{pmatrix} \Phi_1\\ \Phi_2 \end{pmatrix}$$ where $\Phi_1$ and $\Phi_2$ ...