Group theory is a branch of abstract algebra. A group is a set of objects, together with a binary operation, that satisfies four axioms. The set must be closed under the operation and contain an identity object. Every object in the set must have an inverse, and the operation must be associative. ...

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108 views

Research problems in application of Lie groups to differential equations

Are there any open problems in physics involving Lie groups and differential equations for a phd theses. Some applications are say, Noether's theorem in classical or quantum field theory. But I am ...
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91 views

explicit matrix elements for a representation decomposed into subgroup by branching rules

I'm looking for a way to construct a representation for a simple Lie group such that one particular subgroup is manifest. I learned the branching rules from Cahn, Georgi and Slansky, but I'm still not ...
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146 views

Fields with SO(3) diagonal subgroup symmetry

I read about a Higgs field $\vec{\phi}=\frac{1}{2}a\hat{r}\cdot \vec{\sigma}$ (in the context of 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole) with SO(3) diagonal subgroup symmetry consisting of simultaneous and equal ...
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138 views

Group theory notation used in physics (AdS/CFT)

This in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence. I am reading this review on AdS/CFT Aharony et. al. (The MAGOO review) The abstract can be found here Equation (2.50) of the above paper lists the ...
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3answers
189 views

Number of Parameters of Lorentz Group

We embed the rotation group, $SO(3)$ into the Lorentz group, $O(1,3)$ : $SO(3) \hookrightarrow O(1,3)$ and then determine the six generators of Lorentz group: $J_x, J_y, J_z, K_x, K_y, K_z$ from the ...
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3answers
131 views

What does “transform among themselves” mean?

I'm reading a script on atomic physics, and there's a chapter on irreducible tensors. I can't understand the meaning of "transform among themselves" in this context: An arbitrary rotation of the ...
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2answers
991 views

Irreducible representation in physics

I am confused about something. Group theory books written for physicists say that any reducible representation can be decomposed in terms of irreducible representations (so correct me if I am wrong, ...
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1answer
68 views

Finding the stabilizer group given a state

Consider general pure state $|\psi\rangle$ in some hilbert space $\mathcal{H}$ (which could be a tensor product of other Hilbert spaces) I would like to know whether there is a way to ...
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2answers
393 views

Two ways to form SU(2) singlets?

I am trying to reconcile the two ways of forming SU(2) singlets out of a pair of doublets. Method (1): If $v=\begin{pmatrix}v^1\\ v^2\end{pmatrix}$ and $w=\begin{pmatrix}w^1\\ w^2\end{pmatrix}$ are ...
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2answers
261 views

Why does a Lorentz scalar field transform as $U^{-1}(\Lambda)\phi(x)U(\Lambda) = \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x)$?

This problem is from Srednicki page 19. Why $U^{-1}(\Lambda)\phi(x)U(\Lambda) = \phi(\Lambda^{-1}x)$? Can anyone derive this? $\phi$ is a scalar and $\Lambda$ Lorentz transformation.
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1answer
48 views

Unit determinant for relevant symmetry groups in QFT

When treating QFT we want our theory to be invariant under different symmetry groups, for example, the Standard Model is a non-abelian gauge theory with the symmetry group $U(1)×SU(2)×SU(3)$. ...
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127 views

Why do we require the generators of $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ gauge theories to be $N \times N$ matrices?

I have often read that the generators for $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ gauge theories must be $N \times N$ matrices; see for instance these notes at the top of page 3: ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Rotation of angular momentum eigenfunctions?

I am struggling to understand this apparently obvious example in my group theory notes: Where do the $e^{i\phi} $ and $e^{-i\phi} $ factors come from? I know that the $m_l$ = -1,0 and +1 angular ...
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3answers
138 views

How to judge whether a symmetry will be spontaneously broken while only given a Hamiltonian preserving this symmety

As asked in the title, is Hamiltonian containing enough information to judge the existence of spontaneously symmetry breaking? Any examples?
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1answer
98 views

Charge of a field under the action of a group

What does it mean for a field (say, $\phi$) to have a charge (say, $Q$) under the action of a group (say, $U(1)$)?
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2answers
151 views

Non-symmetric Lorentz Matrix

I was working out a relatively simple problem, where one has three inertial systems $S_1$, $S_2$ and $S_3$. $S_2$ moves with a velocity $v$ relative to $S_1$ along it's $x$-axis, while $S_3$ moves ...
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2answers
109 views

A question about relativistic spin operator

The question comes from Ryder's Quantum Field Theory, 2nd edition. The author was looking for relativistic spin operator. It was concluded that it cannot be $J^2:=\mathrm{J} \cdot \mathrm{J}$, where ...
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1answer
448 views

Generators of the lorentz group

I have the following minus sign problem: Consider an infinitesimal Lorentz transformation for which $\Lambda^{\mu}_{\nu}=\delta^{\mu}_{\nu}+\lambda^{\mu}_{\nu}$, where $\lambda^{\mu}_{\nu}$ is ...
2
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1answer
139 views

Lorentz group representations in QFT: what's the vector space?

In QFT, a representation of the Lorentz group is specified as follows: $$ U^\dagger(\Lambda)\phi(x) U(\Lambda)= R(\Lambda)~\phi(\Lambda^{-1}x) $$ Where $\Lambda$ is an element of the Lorentz group, ...
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1answer
103 views

Real representation is physically real?

In Peskin & Schroder, Introduction to Quantum Field Theory equation (15.82) states that $$ t^a_{\bar{r}} = -(t^a_{r})^* = (t^a_{r})^T $$ Why is the representation which satisfies $$ ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

1-dimensional Ring geometry - Group of Translations

I considered a Ring-like one dimensional geometry. In this, if we fix an origin (at some point on the circumference), we can think of set of all displacements along the circumference to form a vector ...
2
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1answer
132 views

How does $SU(2)$ group enters quantum mechanics?

What is the reason that $SU(2)$ group enters quantum mechanics in the context of rotation but not $SO(3)$? What really rotates and which space it rotates? It cannot be the physical electron that ...
2
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1answer
321 views

Noether First and Second Theorem

I have this question related to the the Noether's Theorems. I want to know a rigorous enough enunciation of this theorem, the context is Classical Field Theory without fancy geometrical structures ...
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2answers
130 views

Lorentz homogeneous group and observables

For generators of the Lorentz group we have the following algebra: $$ [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {R}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {R}_{k}, \quad [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {L}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat ...
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1answer
342 views

Eigenvectors of a 4D rotation, and their interpretation

Let us define a 4D rotation by using two unit quaternions: $$\mathring{q}_l=\frac{a+ib+jc+kd}{\left|a+ib+jc+kd\right|}$$ and $$\mathring{q}_r=\frac{e+ib+jc+kd}{\left|e+ib+jc+kd\right|}.$$ They differ ...
2
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1answer
184 views

Does anyone know the difference and relation between $k\cdot p$ method and tight binding (TB) method?

Among the methods of calculating energy bands for crystals, first-principles method is the most accurate. Besides first principles, two commonly used modeling methods are the $k\cdot p$ method and ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

What is the Physical Significance of Tr(A) w.r.t. Matrix Representations in Group Theory

I've seen the post on mathoverflow.SE asking almost the same question, and I have indeed flipped through said answers, but most are in a more general context ie quantum mechanics and do not provide a ...
2
votes
1answer
180 views

Lorentz group representation and transformation of “vectors”

Let $P$ be the parity operator of the Lorentz group, $$P=\begin{pmatrix}1&0&0&0\\0&-1&0&0\\0&0&-1&0\\0&0&0&-1\end{pmatrix}$$ the commutation relations ...
2
votes
1answer
252 views

What exactly means “is a singlet under $SU(N)$” [duplicate]

I don't get a grip of what that exactly means. What IS an abstract singlet, doublet,... under $SU(N)$ or other groups?
2
votes
1answer
148 views

How do representations of an isometry group correspond to degrees of freedom/entropy in a system?

To put the question into context: I am currently writing my bachelors thesis on de Sitter space, specifically, $dS_4$. I am trying to show that while the horizon entropy is finite, the isometry group ...
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0answers
28 views

How does the choice of a particular vacuum in a field theory problem decide the number of Goldstone bosons?

How does the field expansion method (by this I mean expanding your fields about a chosen VEV and plugging into a given potential so that the masses of the fields are given by the coefficients in ...
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0answers
34 views

What is 'heterotic string compactification'?

I've read that some exceptional groups arises in the context of 'heterotic string compactification'. Could someone explain (to a person studying physics but who doesn't know string theory) what ...
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0answers
74 views

Why is the projective symmetry group (PSG) called projective?

As discussed by Prof.Wen in the context of the quantum orders of spin liquids, PSG is defined as all the transformations that leave the mean-field ansatz invariant, IGG is the so-called invariant ...
2
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0answers
75 views

Show the Lie algebra is the same for $SU(2) \times SU(2)$ and Lorentz group

So I know: $$[\sigma_{I},\sigma{j}] = 2i \epsilon_{ijk} \sigma_{k}$$ So two products of this should give us the Lorentz group: $SO(4) = SU(2) \times SU(2)$ Where $SO(4)$ has 3 Lie algebra which can ...
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0answers
92 views

Solving the Schrodinger equation with appropriate symmetry

In the paper Markov Fields by Edward Nelson the introduction section claims that analytically continuing a Markov process with appropriate symmetry properties yields the solution of the Schrodinger ...
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0answers
101 views

How symmetry is related to the degeneracy?

I have several questions about symmetry in quantum mechanics. It is often said that the degeneracy is the dimension of irreducible representation. I can understand that if the Hamiltonian has a ...
2
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0answers
55 views

Matrix Representations of Galilean group

The general group element (in the vector representation) $$ \left [{ \begin{array} {c} \bar x^1 \\ \bar x^2 \\ \bar x^3 \\ \bar t \\ 1 \\ \end{array} } \right] = \left[ ...
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0answers
79 views

Group of translations in two dimensions - A weird treatment

Again, as usual Schwinger leaves me startled as he writes, the Hermitian displacement operator in 2D is $$ G = p_1\delta x_1 +p_2 \delta x_2 $$ Now, we know clearly that this group is an Abelian ...
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0answers
62 views

Quantum Field Theory and Lie Theory [duplicate]

I am reading Vol.1 of "The Quantum Theory Of Fields" by S. Weinberg. However I have come to a halt when connected Lie groups were introduced. I have solid knowledge in elementary group theory and ...
2
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0answers
72 views

Interesting identity on $SU(3)$

In arXiv:hep-ph/1307.5414 Grabovsky use an interesting identity which is not derived in the paper: ...
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Does the low-energy gauge structure depend on the choice of $SU(2)$ gauge freedom?

The starting point and notations used here are presented in Two puzzles on the Projective Symmetry Group(PSG)?. As we know, Invariant Gauge Group(IGG) is a normal subgroup of Projective Symmetry ...
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175 views

Conformal group in two dimensions [closed]

How can one show in a group-theoretical way that each of SO(d,2) and SO(d+1,1) is isomorphic to two-copies of Virasoro algebra for d=2?
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1answer
150 views

Action of the Lorentz group on scalar fields

The Lorentz groups act on the scalar fields as: $\phi'(x)=\phi(\Lambda^{-1} x)$ The conditions for an action of a group on a set are that the identity does nothing and that $(g_1g_2)s=g_1(g_2s)$. ...
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vote
1answer
258 views

Proof of Pauli group preservation by Clifford group conjugation?

A well know result is that Clifford group preserve the Pauli group under conjugation or, in other words: $C(P_{1} \otimes P_{2})C^{\dagger} = P_{3} \otimes P_{4}$, with $C \in$ Clifford group and ...
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2answers
171 views

Why is the crystallography restriction obeyed?

The crystallography restriction states that any 2-dimensional lattice can have rotational symmetry of degree 1, 2, 3, 4 or 6 - and that's it. A simple proof of I've heard of this is: the magnitude of ...
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3answers
262 views

Anybody have example of two-qubit non-Pauli and non-Clifford quantum gate?

A lot of known quantum gates are in the Pauli group (I,X,Z,Y) or in the Clifford group (H,P,Cnot). I need examples of the quantum gates that aren't in this groups. Also, are there are matlab functions ...
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3answers
320 views

Difference between $SU(2)$ and $SU(2)$ gauge transformations?

I hear this jargon all the time, so what is the difference? (Of course this is nothing special to $SU(2)$, but rather I just took it as an example)
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1answer
219 views

Why do we use the complexification of the Lorentz group?

I do understand why we are using the double cover, but why exactly do we make the transition to complex Lorentz transformations? Where and why are they needed? To be precise: The double cover of ...
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vote
1answer
184 views

Spin(n) group SO(n) relation

Is it correct to state that the elements of Spin(n) fulfill a Clifford algebra and that the Lie group generators of Spin(n) is given by the commutator of the elements? If not, then what is the ...
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1answer
259 views

Irreducible tensor representations with “covariant” indices

As a follow-up of my question on the "most general" $\mathrm{SU}(2)$-symmetric interaction of two spin 1/2 particles, I ponder the following question: Consider an operator acting just on one particle ...