0
votes
4answers
127 views

Nature of Fields in QFT

I'm not exactly an expert in quantum physics, but this seems to be a simple question, and I can't find an answer anywhere! There are specific types of fields used in physics: scalar fields (i.e. as ...
3
votes
1answer
165 views

Fundamental representation in quantum field theory

In QFT we associate to each Gauge theory a continuous group of local transformations (a Gauge group), and then we require\define fermion fields to be irreducible representations belonging to the ...
5
votes
0answers
36 views

Spin-dependence of the directionality of dipole radiation

I am interested in understanding how and whether the transformation properties of a (classical or quantum) field under rotations or boosts relate in a simple way to the directional dependence of the ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

What are differences between Spin(3,1), SL(2,C), SO(3,1) and SU(2) representations? Which one is correct exact representation for spinor fields? [duplicate]

I want to understand which group transformations exactly represent spinor fields. That is, do spinor fields transform under the Lorentz group $\mathrm{SO}(3,1)$ or under $\mathrm{Spin}(3,1)$? What ...
3
votes
2answers
77 views

What is the axial transformation of a group, i.e. $SU(3)$?

The Gell-Mann matrices $\lambda^\alpha$ are the generators of $SU(3)$. Applying an SU(3) - transformation on the triple $q = ( u , d, s )$ of 4-spinors looks like this: $$ q \rightarrow q' = e^{i ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Does spin-0 or spin-2 describe massive or massless particles?

spin-0 is massive or massless? How does we separate the massive and massless degrees of freedom for spin-2? What is the partially massive?
1
vote
0answers
23 views

(A,B)-Representation of Lorentz Group: Coefficient functions of fields

I have a question regarding the construction of general causal fields in Weinberg's book on quantum field theory. In his conventions a field that transforms according to the irreducible (A,B) ...
2
votes
1answer
255 views

Lorentz group representations in QFT: what's the vector space?

In QFT, a representation of the Lorentz group is specified as follows: $$ U^\dagger(\Lambda)\phi(x) U(\Lambda)= R(\Lambda)~\phi(\Lambda^{-1}x) $$ Where $\Lambda$ is an element of the Lorentz group, ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

I want to decompose a tensor product using Littlewood-Richardson rule, How do I find the component of this in each irreducible space?

Let me set up the notation I am using. $(abc,de)$ denotes the standard Young tableau where the first row is $abc$ and the second row is $de$. Each young tableau corresponds to the young symmetriser, ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

From Symmetry Group to Physics Equations

To the extent that I know: There are symmetry groups like the rotation groups SO(3), the Groups of Poincare Transformations,... If the physics of a system has a symmetry group G, then it can be ...
16
votes
2answers
475 views

Why are only linear representations of the Lorentz group considered as fundamental quantum fields?

As described in many Q&As around here, fundamental quantum fields are expressed as irreducible representations of the Lorentz group. This argument is entirely clear - we live in a ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Young Tableau Projectors: Does the order of symmetric and anti-symmetric projectors matter?

Given a Young Tableau we find the irreducible basis of an arbitrary tensor by projecting, The projectors are usually defined as first symmetrise over the row entries and then anti-symmetrise over the ...
2
votes
0answers
30 views

How does the choice of a particular vacuum in a field theory problem decide the number of Goldstone bosons?

How does the field expansion method (by this I mean expanding your fields about a chosen VEV and plugging into a given potential so that the masses of the fields are given by the coefficients in ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

How does the choice of a basis decide how many Goldstone bosons there are under spontaneous symmetry breaking?

I have a question about how the basis you choose in a field theory problem semmingly decides how many Goldstone bosons you get after spontaneous symmetry breaking. For SU(2), if you choose the 3 Pauli ...
3
votes
1answer
154 views

Reducibility of tensor products of Lorentz group representations

Consider the statement: (34.29 in Srednicki's QFT text) $$\tag{34.29} (2,1)\otimes(1,2)\otimes(2,2)~=~(1,1)\oplus\ldots$$ Where of course, $(a,b)$ label representations of Lorentz group in the usual ...
4
votes
2answers
116 views

What guarantees the existence of unitary operators implementing Lorentz Transformations?

This should be a very basic question. In introductory QFT books, often one of the first things we see is the following claim: for every Lorentz transformation $\Lambda$, we can associate an unitary ...
9
votes
2answers
176 views

From representations to field theories

The one-particle states as well as the fields in quantum field theory are regarded as representations of Poincare group, e.g. scalar, spinor, and vector representations. Is there any systematical ...
4
votes
1answer
146 views

Lorentz transformation of the vacuum state

In general, the Hamiltonian $H$ has non-zero vacuum expectation value (VEV): $$ H \left.| \Omega \right> = E_0 \left.|\Omega \right>, $$ where $\left.|\Omega\right>$ is the vacuum state. The ...
5
votes
2answers
251 views

Rotation Group and Lorentz Group

It is often stated that rotations in the 3 spatial dimensions are examples of Lorentz transformations. But Lorentz transformations form a group named the Lorentz Group, $O(1,3)$ which is a group a ...
7
votes
2answers
398 views

$(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ representation of $SU(2)\otimes SU(2)$

The representation $(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ of the Lorentz group correspond to a four- vector or a spin-one object. Right? Does it imply that any four-vector is identical to a spin-one object or ...
8
votes
1answer
124 views

Complex Representation of a gauge group and a Chiral Gauge Theory

In this John Preskill et al paper, a statement is made in page 1: We will refer to a gauge theory with fermions transforming as a complex representation of the gauge group as a chiral gauge ...
12
votes
2answers
567 views

What does a $SU(2)$ doublet really mean?

What do we really mean when we say that the neutron and proton wavefunctions together form an $SU(2)$ doublet? What is the significance of this? What does this transformation really doing to the ...
3
votes
3answers
795 views

Dirac spinor and Weyl spinor

How can it be shown that the Dirac spinor is the direct sum of a right handed Weyl spinor and a left handed Weyl spinor? EDIT:- Let $\psi_L$ and $\psi_R$ be 2 component left-handed and right-handed ...
2
votes
3answers
183 views

How do you find a particular representation for Grassmann numbers?

This question is more general in the sense that I want to know how one finds a particular (say matrix) representation for any object. For the case of Grassmann numbers we have from Wikipedia the ...
3
votes
0answers
51 views

$\mathcal{N}=4$ SUSY in $d=3$ versus $\mathcal{N}=2$ in $d=4$

Which is the field content of the hypermultiplet and the vector multiplet in $\mathcal{N}=4 \ d=3$ Supersymmmetry? Is it correct to state that $\mathcal{N}=4$ in $d=3$ has $8$ supercharges, (since ...
10
votes
2answers
502 views

How to prove $(\gamma^\mu)^\dagger=\gamma^0\gamma^\mu\gamma^0$?

Studying the basics of spin-$\frac{1}{2}$ QFT, I encountered the gamma matrices. One important property is $(\gamma^5)^\dagger=\gamma^5$, the hermicity of $\gamma^5$. After some searching, I stumbled ...
6
votes
2answers
579 views

Why does adjoint representation matter in some field theories?

Recently I am reading a paper about monopoles. In several cases, it seems that writing fields in adjoint representation of the gauge group makes a difference. Once it leads to different group after ...
5
votes
0answers
179 views

Fields with SO(3) diagonal subgroup symmetry

I read about a Higgs field $\vec{\phi}=\frac{1}{2}a\hat{r}\cdot \vec{\sigma}$ (in the context of 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole) with SO(3) diagonal subgroup symmetry consisting of simultaneous and equal ...
1
vote
0answers
85 views

How to show that higher derivative theories (mostly) breaks unitarity

How to show that higher derivative theories (mostly) breaks unitarity? Spinor field $\psi_{a_{1}...a_{n}\dot {b}_{1}..\dot {b}_{m}} $, which refer to the $\left( \frac{n}{2}, \frac{m}{2} \right)$ ...
4
votes
1answer
291 views

Representations of the Conformal Group in terms of the Poincare Group Reps

The Conformal group contains the Poincare group. Typically, if you take a representation of a group and then look at it as a representation of a subgroup, the representation will be reducible. I often ...
5
votes
2answers
476 views

Why do we say that irreducible representation of Poincare group represents the one-particle state?

Only because Rep is unitary, so saves positive-definite norm (for possibility density), Casimir operators of the group have eigenvalues $m^{2}$ and $m^2s(s + 1)$, so characterizes mass and spin, and ...
4
votes
1answer
266 views

Lorentz group and classification of fields by their transformation under Lorentz transformations

Let's have Lorentz group with generators of 3-rotations, $\hat {R}_{i}$, and Lorentz boosts, $\hat {L}_{i}$. By introducing operators $\hat {J}_{i} = \frac{1}{2}\left(\hat {R}_{i} + i\hat ...
2
votes
2answers
131 views

Lorentz homogeneous group and observables

For generators of the Lorentz group we have the following algebra: $$ [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {R}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {R}_{k}, \quad [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {L}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat ...
4
votes
2answers
276 views

Why do single particle states furnish a rep. of the inhomogeneous Lorentz group?

Following up on this question: Weinberg says In general, it may be possible by using suitable linear combinations of the $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ to choose the $\sigma$ labels in such a way that ...
1
vote
1answer
174 views

Physical Interpretation of Lorentz-transformed Single Particle states being linear

As in this question, let $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ be a single-particle 4-momentum eigenstate, with $\sigma$ being a discrete label of other degrees of freedom. Weinberg discusses the effect of a homogenous ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Why are non-momentum DoFs of single-particle states discretely labeled?

Following the treatment of Weinberg, chapter 2, we consider $\psi_{p,\sigma}$ as single-particle eigenstates of the 4-momentum. Weinberg says that $\sigma$ labels all other degrees of freedom and we ...
4
votes
2answers
374 views

How to directly calculate the infinitesimal generator of SU(2)

We commonly investigate the properties of SU(2) on the basis of SO(3). However, I want to directly calculte the infinitesimal generator of SU(2) according to the definition $$X_{i}=\frac{\partial ...
6
votes
2answers
801 views

Irreducible Representations Of Lorentz Group

In Weinberg's The Theory of Quantum Fields Volume 1, he considers classification one-particle states under inhomogeneous Lorentz group. My question only considers pages 62-64. He define states as ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Trace and adjoint representation of $SU(N)$

In the adjoint representation of $SU(N)$, the generators $t^a_G$ are chosen as $$ (t^a_G)_{bc}=-if^{abc} $$ The following identity can be found in Taizo Muta's book "Foundations of Quantum ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

Supersymmetry and non-compact $R$-symmetry group?

The $R$-symmetry for $N$ supercharges is $U(N)$. Is it possible to generalize $R$-symmetry [let's take $U(4)$) to be something like $U(2,2)$ (maybe analogous to Wick rotation of $SO(3,1)$ to ...
6
votes
1answer
159 views

Are group representations possible when the solution space is not a vector space?

As far as I understand, the motivation for using representation theory in high energy physics is as follows. Assume that a theory has some (internal or external) symmetry group which acts on a vector ...
1
vote
1answer
151 views

Action of the Lorentz group on scalar fields

The Lorentz groups act on the scalar fields as: $\phi'(x)=\phi(\Lambda^{-1} x)$ The conditions for an action of a group on a set are that the identity does nothing and that $(g_1g_2)s=g_1(g_2s)$. ...
6
votes
1answer
229 views

Equivalent Representations of Clifford Algebra

I'm reviewing David Tong's excellent QFT lecture notes here and am a little confused by something he writes on page 94. We've considered the standard chiral representation of the Clifford Algebra, ...
5
votes
2answers
496 views

Number of Components of a Spinor

I'm trying to develop my understanding of spinors. In quantum field theory I've learned that a spinor is a 4 component complex vector field on Minkowski space which transforms under the chiral ...
3
votes
2answers
499 views

Lorentz transformations in Dirac equation

Let's denote a spinor $\xi$. If $(\theta ,\phi)$ are the parameters of a rotation and pure Lorentz transformation, then how $\xi$ could be written as $$\xi ~\rightarrow~ \exp\left(\ i ...
2
votes
1answer
183 views

Taylor series for unitary operator in Weinberg

On page 54 of Weinberg's QFT I, he says that an element $T(\theta)$ of a connected Lie group can be represented by a unitary operator $U(T(\theta))$ acting on the physical Hilbert space. Near the ...
5
votes
4answers
633 views

Calculating the commutator of Pauli-Lubanski operator and generators of Lorentz group

The Pauli-Lubanski operator is defined as $${W^\alpha } = \frac{1}{2}{\varepsilon ^{\alpha \beta \mu \nu }}{P_\beta}{M_{\mu \nu }},\qquad ({\varepsilon ^{0123}} = + 1,\;{\varepsilon _{0123}} = - ...
5
votes
2answers
765 views

Particle as a representation of the Lorentz group

In QFT one may refer to a particle as a representation of the Lorentz group (LG). More accurately - every particle is a quantum of some field $\phi(x)$ that belongs to some representation of the LG. I ...
3
votes
1answer
521 views

Does a spin-2 particle really return to its previous state after 180° rotation?

It is often claimed that spin-2 particles return to their previous state after $\pi$ rotation, just like spin-1/2 particles return after $4\pi$ rotation. But my calculation suggests otherwise. Let z ...
1
vote
1answer
895 views

Yukawa Coupling of a Scalar $SU(2)$ Triplet to a Left-Handed Fermionic $SU(2)$ Doublet

Suppose we have a field theory with a single complex scalar field $\phi$ and a single Dirac Fermion $\psi$, both massless. Let us write $\psi _L=\frac{1}{2}(1-\gamma ^5)\psi$. Then, the Yukawa ...