Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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Why does General Relativity predict more light deflection than Netwonian Physics?

If one looks at the limit as light's mass approaches zero, Newtonian Physics predicts a deflection of light (this can be seen by the fact that all objects are accelerate the same due to gravity.) ...
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66 views

Can gravitational force act as an impulsive force in any case? [closed]

Can gravitational force be termed as impulsive in any case? I' m thinking about it but couldn't get any answer. When two heavenly objects collide then the force exerted on each of them during the time ...
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1answer
159 views

Why will this plan for a perpetual motion device not work? [duplicate]

I have made a plan for a perpetual motion device, but I am sure that it won't work because otherwise the world would be relying on it right now. I know that perpetual motion defies the laws of ...
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2answers
98 views

Are time and gravity affected when at rest compared to free fall?

A falling object moves along a geodesic path ('straight path') in spacetime. When it comes to rest it now follows a 'curved path' through spacetime. Is the passage of time and force of gravity ...
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127 views

Curved paths through spacetime when standing still?

I have heard that falling objects fall at the same rate irrespective of their mass. They are 'following straight line paths through curved spacetime'. Does this mean that objects that accelerate in ...
3
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1answer
120 views

Gravitational wave solutions to the Einstein field equations

It is well known that general relativity predicts gravitational waves, but I would like to know how. What solution(s) to the Einstein field equations yield something which can be interpreted as a ...
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60 views

How much additional light does Earth receive from the Sun due to Earth's gravitational field?

I was reading about how gravity affects light, and that got me wondering how much additional light is collected by the Sun due to the Earth's gravitational field. Is it a significant amount of light ...
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51 views

Supermassive Black holes at centers of galaxies [duplicate]

Why there is super-massive black holes at the center of our galaxy and other galaxies ?
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51 views

Does relativistic glider violate principle of equivalence?

The relativistic glider proposed can slow down the fall of an object in gravitational field. Will this violate the principle of equivalence which says that one cannot distinguish between free falling ...
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1answer
195 views

Can we manipulate gravitation? [closed]

When I studied general relativity, my teacher said that what we knew today about gravitation was no better than what we had already known since Newton's time, because so far we could only propose ...
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3answers
130 views

Can asteroids fall on earth and hit the surface at 90 degree angle?

I always Saw in movies ,cartoons every where that asteroids hit the earth at an angle (not 90 degree). But Why ? ...
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576 views

Spacetime geometry around two black holes

For space-time geometry we all know images like he one below. But if I were to take a neutron star and put it right next to but not touching a black hole what effect would that have on the geometry of ...
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2answers
100 views

Could synchrotron radiation be produced by a gravitational field instead of a magnetic field?

I know that synchrotron radiation is produced when a charged particle is accelerated radially by a magnetic field, but I was wondering if synchrotron radiation could also be produced by an uncharged ...
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2answers
395 views

If photons have no (rest) mass, why would black holes attract light? [duplicate]

I was told that photons have no (rest) mass. However I thought that black holes are called "black" because no light can go escape the gravity force in their vicinity. I somehow think that, if light is ...
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1answer
82 views

Higgs boson and gravity [closed]

I was reading earlier about how Higgs boson (aka The God Particle) is responsible for giving mass certain properties. Among these properties is gravity. What I'm wondering is, by studying Higgs boson, ...
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2answers
96 views

Gravity and its energy

Where does gravity get its energy from? So, I'm taking a high school environmental science class and we just started a unit on energy. We were talking about different types of energy and one was ...
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3answers
1k views

Event Horizon of Supermassive Black Holes

I'm going to ask/explain this as best I can; I'm sure I have some fundamentals wrong here. Spaghettification is a phenomenon which occurs only in stellar-mass black holes owing to the immense gravity ...
4
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2answers
125 views

Is gravity a force? [duplicate]

If gravity just emerges from the curvature of spacetime, is it actually a force? Why is it one of the 4 fundamental forces of nature?
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2answers
148 views

How do we know that gravity is a fundamental force, rather than an emergent one?

How do we know that gravity is a fundamental force, rather than an emergent one? Also, what are the smallest masses and length scales for which we have measured it?
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3answers
129 views

What would happen if you open a bottle of fizzy drink in a weightless environment?

On Earth, pouring a fizzy drink into a glass or opening a bottle, you see the gas start to condense out into bubbles which rise upwards. You can't pour a Coke into a glass on the ISS but you could (I ...
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1answer
119 views

Virtual Photon transmission speed of a Static Electric Field?

In the case of a non-accelerating point charge "A" of stable velocity, its static field is treated as though it is instantaneously present at a distance, i.e. a second point charge "B" will react to ...
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96 views

What is the source of water and waves on the water planet in the movie Interstellar?

We will ignore some of the more obvious issues with the movie and assume all other things are consistent to have fun with some of these questions. Simple [hopefully] Pre-questions: 1) If the water ...
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1answer
222 views

If space warps distort moving objects' trajectories, does it mean that static objects are immune to gravity? [closed]

If gravity is just space distortion, which affects trajectories of moving objects, then a static object (not moving, thus no trajectory) will not suffer any type of accelerating force from gravity? ...
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1answer
142 views

Can the Alcubierre Drive be explained by Gravitoelectromagnetism? [closed]

Even though there is no experimental evidence, that the Alcubierre drive works. The Einstein field equations permit this solution. For Gravitoelectromagnetism there are hints and ongoing efforts to ...
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1answer
375 views

Does a ball resting on the ground have acceleration?

Does a ball resting on the Earth's ground have acceleration caused by gravity?
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1answer
82 views

Gravitation between a homogeneous ring and a mass [closed]

I got a problem with describing the gravitational attraction between a homogeneous ring and a point mass. Let $m$ be the point mass as showed in the picture, lying a $x$-distance away on the ...
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2answers
123 views

Can other fundamental forces bend spacetime?

I was wondering what makes gravity so special that it bends spacetime? and if it is part of the four-fundamental forces, why or why cant the other forces bend the time space continuum?
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81 views

How could gravity affect the expansion of the universe?

I've read several books which talk about gravity slowing down, halting, or reversing the expansion of the universe. The expansion is often compared to a stretching of space at every point, so that the ...
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1answer
263 views

The original thorium reactor?

With lunar thorium being common, and heavier than iron or nickel, does earth's core have the the occasional nuclear reaction?
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183 views

Could a really tall tube suck garbage in to space?

When I was around 10 years old, I had this idea that was supposed to solve our waste problems; I imagined having tubes miles high that would stretch in to space. Every tube would have a door at the ...
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2answers
534 views

Visualizing gravity in 3D

We've all seen the depiction of gravity bending space downwards, and so attracting objects into the dent it creates, cf. e.g. this and this Phys.SE posts. That's intuitive and makes a lot of sense, ...
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3answers
353 views

What is gravity and what causes objects to act against it?

So I understand the concept of gravity, in that it's not actually a force, but more of a displacement in the spacetime grid. An object with a big enough mass will bend the spacetime, causing smaller ...
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234 views

Monopole Gravitational waves exist?

GR says that monopole gravitational radiation does not exist. I understand the reasons for this. However there is this effect (which seems to me to have the hallmarks of a wave). Paper at arXiv: ...
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2answers
457 views

When objects fall along geodesic paths of curved space-time, why is there no force acting on them?

On cseligman.com, it is written that So, we see things falling with an acceleration which we call the acceleration of gravity,and thinking that we live in a straight line , uniformly moving or ...
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2answers
75 views

Is gravity a centripetal force?

In curved space-time, there are curved paths. Since curved paths in our experience require some centripetal force to create them, isn't then gravity a centripetal force?
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68 views

Gravitational… confinement?

This is a followup to Ergil's question "Weak isospin confinement?". According to the Wikipedia article on color confinement: The current theory is that confinement is due to the ...
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1answer
108 views

Work performed by a stationary object in a gravitational field “on Earth”

I was thinking about this problem: How much work is required to hold an object stationary in a gravitational field? or: How much energy is required to keep an object stationary in a ...
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1answer
87 views

Why does the motion of the planet around a star cause a centrifugal force?

Please consider the differences in Newtonian physics and general relativity. Newtonian physics In Newtonian physics it makes sense that objects placed on a planets surface facing away from the ...
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80 views

Does uniform distribution of background matter affect the dynamics of a gravitational system?

Situation 1: A test particle of mass m moves around a big mass M in a Keplerian orbit. The orbital period is easily found, given certain initial conditions. Situation 2: The same system of two bodies ...
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77 views

Electromagnetic radiation bending on Earth

Most articles say that a radiowave is able to propagate itself beyond the horizon because it is reflected off by the ionosphere (and the Earth itself). But do radio waves also get bent according to ...
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32 views

Antimatter traveling back in time and gravity [duplicate]

I've been reading on the construct of considering antimatter as matter traveling backward in time, which seems like an useful tool. There seems to be some discussion around this concept, if ...
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2answers
121 views

How would gravitons couple to the Stress-Energy tensor?

How would gravitons couple to the Stress-Energy tensor $T^{\mu\nu}$? How did physicists arrive at this result? I've read that it follows from the analysis of irreducible representations of the ...
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1answer
52 views

Does light or waves have any kind of mass? [duplicate]

Just like the previous question, Even I have been studying Hawking's A Brief History Of Time and even I was thinking of Einstein's General Relativity. But I was unable to accept his view of GRAVITY. ...
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1answer
272 views

How can magic be explained with Physics? [closed]

Assuming that, hypothetically, and for this example only, "magic" means things like magical powers. In movies, games, etc. we witness magic; however, it's never explained how it works with regards ...
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1answer
121 views

Questioning Einstein's view on gravity [duplicate]

Oke, so my mind is blown by Einsteins view on gravity, at least as far as I understand the basics and principles he based his views on. One of the first things that struck me was that most of his ...
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1answer
106 views

How do you find the tension in the real world? (Given a rope in a pulley system)

I'm well aware of the formula to calculate tension, however, given a real world situation where you have a closed pulley system. How do you measure the force (i.e., tension) required to pull on the ...
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209 views

Is gravitational Chern-Simons action “topological” or not?

Here are the 2+1D gravitational Chern-Simons action of the connection $\Gamma$ or spin-connection: $$ S=\int\Gamma\wedge\mathrm{d}\Gamma + \frac{2}{3}\Gamma\wedge\Gamma\wedge\Gamma \tag{a} $$ $$ ...
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2answers
350 views

If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?

If a plane turns 90 degrees such that it is flying sideways, is it accelerating towards the earth at the usual 9.8 m/s^2? My guess is that the plane must be in free fall because I don't see what ...
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1answer
100 views

How possible is it that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on its second try, could disrupt the gravity of Earth?

How possible is it that the Large Hadron Collider, on its second try, could disrupt the gravity of Earth?
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194 views

Why is the gravitational force $10^{38}$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?

Also, why is the weak interaction force $10^7$ times smaller than the strong nuclear force?