Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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Theoretical Possibility of “Opposite” Gravitational Mass? [duplicate]

This is an unusual idea that I have been entertaining for some time, and I can't find anything about it online. However, it is so simple that someone must have conceived it before. First, I will ...
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1answer
28 views

Can a tidally locked planet have a horizontal rotational axis?

Is it hypothetically possible for a planet to be both tidally locked, and still have a rotation "horizontally"? Where the substellar point would in effect be like the point of a top, spinning and yet ...
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2answers
43 views

What is the relationship between the flow rate of time and gravitational field?

I have heard, qualitatively, about the fact that time's rate of flow slows when the gravitational field is "strong". Here I am looking for some more rigorous descriptions of this phenomenon. My first ...
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3answers
233 views

Gravitational self-interaction

Today, someone asked me why "the warped space-time warps itself" (he read it in Kip Thorne's: The Science of Interstellar). I guess this is related to the gravitational self-interaction. But I don't ...
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If mass increases as velocity increases, does gravity increase as well? [duplicate]

The way I understand it, velocity and mass are tied together with relativity. As I increase in velocity, I increase my mass until my mass is so great that it would take more energy than the entire ...
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41 views

Can the KLT low-energy limit relations be obtained without string theory?

The KLT (Kawai-Lewellen-Tye) relations roughly say that -at the tree level- closed string amplitudes equal open string amplitudes squared and in the low-energy limit this becomes a "Gravity = Gauge ...
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55 views

Does orbital motion cause rotation?

Assume the moon was flying freely in space, and not rotating at all. If if then happened to pass earth at just the right distance and velocity to fall into orbit, would its absolute rotation be ...
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34 views

Can a micro black hole hover above a regular black hole?

So let's say you have a black hole $A$, that is small enough for its gravity to be very small, but has strong hawking radiation, and larger black hole, $B$, with very small hawking radiation, but ...
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1answer
65 views

When we spin and feel our arms fly, is it the effect of gravity?

If accelerating reference frames can be treated as normal inertial reference frames but with gravity, then for a rotating reference frame, is the centrifugal force = gravity? More specifically, I was ...
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213 views

Is it possible that dark-matter is composed of a large number of neutrinos from the big bang? [duplicate]

They seem to have all the properties of dark-matter (massive, with no electromagnetic interaction). Could it be that many of the neutrinos produced since the big bang have formed massive neutrino ...
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2answers
99 views

Derivation for the temperature of Reissner-Nordström (charged) black hole

A lot of the text for this is from "How does one correctly interpret the behavior of the heat capacity of a charged black hole?" but this concerns a different question. The Reissner-Nordström black ...
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Is the energy released by gravitional waves kinetic energy or converted rest mass?

It is said that at the binary black hole collision LIGO detected recently, the energy equivalent of 3 solar masses has been released. Since no matter can escape a black hole, the only source I can ...
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57 views

Can solar flares affect gravity?

Can a large eruption of solar flares on our sun change the effects of its gravity ever so slightly, and is it possible to measure these changes with the equipment we have today.
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116 views

Does light have mass? [closed]

Does light have mass? If yes, will it exert force? If no, then how are light particles are travelling at light speed? If light doesn't have mass how is it attracted by gravitational force (black holes)...
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1answer
71 views

Is this actually how gravity is illustrated? [duplicate]

In general relativity, gravity is said to be caused by the curvature of space time. And there are examples that illustrate gravity such as this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTY1Kje0yLg, and ...
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1answer
118 views

Gravity with more than one metric tensor

As weird as it sounds, yes, there are gravity theories with more than one metric tensor. This is called bimetric gravity. My question to those who have encountered bimetric gravity before: a) ...
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2answers
89 views

Can a system be engineered to cause a standing wave resonance with gravity waves? [closed]

Thank you Docscience for helping me adjust my question in a better direction. My interest has been sparked by getting Into the chapter of waves in physics class and of course the new discovery of ...
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1answer
75 views

Trouble in understanding spacetime

I have a problem in understanding spacetime. What i understood from the conversion of time to distance is that the interval between any two events is always the same for any observer. But how is that ...
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1answer
211 views

Why doesn't gravity fit into quantum theory?

Before you read, I want to point out that I probably don't know nearly as much as you guys about quantum theory, even though I love learning about it, so I would prefer explanations in relatively ...
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1answer
77 views

Gravity and elliptical orbits

All orbits are elliptical and special orbits are circular (like when both bodies have the same mass or when the second body's mass is negligibly small). In a circular orbit centrifugal force (which I ...
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3answers
357 views

How does the curvature of spacetime exert a force on a stationary object?

I understand the idea that, when spacetime is warped by a large mass, objects that try to travel in straight lines instead move along curved geodesics, something Newton would describe as an ...
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2answers
91 views

What is the speed of gravity in a Schwarzschild metric?

The question "How does gravity escape a black hole?" has been asked, but the responses are not fully satisfying. Frederic Brunner gives a startling intuitive answer: "Gravitational attraction ... is ...
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2answers
45 views

How does gravity affect different bodies? [duplicate]

To my understanding,the force of gravity increases as the mass of the body increases (ex. the moon has less gravity than the earth). So, intuitively, I would come to assume that the force of gravity ...
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0answers
30 views

Space/time elasticity and state changing

What happens to a particular section of space/time that has been bent due to a large gravitational force that has passed it by? Does it "snap back" to it's original state. Is it permanently bent? Is ...
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1answer
43 views

Is my mass relative?

Mass is said to be a source of gravity (I think:p), but if I were to travel into space. Would it change with respect to someone on earth? Since the gravity changes in space, but does it affect the ...
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23 views

Can curved space also cause repulsion? [duplicate]

Usually curved spacetime looks like it causes objects to attract to each other. But is the opposite also possible? For instance if I twist/curve a towel in one direction it is getting smaller but in ...
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8answers
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Short of collision, can gravity itself kill you?

Imagine that you are falling into object with huge gravity (i.e. black hole) that does not have any atmosphere. The question is - before you hit the ground, can the gravity itself (which would be ...
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Earth's gravitational waves? Measurable?

Why don't they measure Earth's gravitational waves which has stronger effect holding us on planet and sounds to me maybe stronger instead of measuring far black hole mass created wave 1/1000th of ...
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2answers
68 views

Gravitational wave of Big bang? [duplicate]

Questions about the g-wave caused by the big bang: 1)was there a g-wave produced? 2) when will it reach us? 3) will it be too weak for us to detect(atleast now?)?
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1answer
70 views

Calculating Potential Energy

I'm familiar with the potential energy equation, but I'm concerned with the value of 'g' in it. I know that, at sea level, earth's gravitational acceleration is 9.81 m/s/s. So I know that within the ...
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1answer
52 views

What are the implications of the LIGO results in reference to our current Cosmological models?

I was looking for some explicit information on the implications of the LIGO results or probing eras prior to the or near to the Big Bang singularity. So, my question is therefore, what, if any, are ...
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23 views

Warping of space time by objects

Note: This question may seem very silly, because I have never formally studied the physics I'm about to ask about at all, all the knowledge I have is from watching videos on YouTube out of interest or ...
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1answer
242 views

How can gravitational waves dissipate the energy carried by them? [duplicate]

I am not an expert on GR or gravitational waves but i have been reading about them and i wondered about where and how do these gravitational waves dump their energy? I read that the black hole ...
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1answer
70 views

The inside of of a black hole

I am looking for a confirmation (or correction) of my thinking about the nature of the black holes. As I am not a physicist and only a physics enthusiast, my understanding is probably very simplified ...
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2answers
58 views

Moving an object in hand back and forth creates a gravitational wave?

Does moving an object in one's hand back and forth create a wave? It creates a changing gravitation field and that propagates as a wave, right? How does that differ from a "gravitational" wave that ...
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Can Newton's law of gravitation and Einstein's GR be considered true and complete laws of gravitation? [closed]

Newton's law of gravitation and Einstein's general relativity (GR) are empirical laws of gravitation that are strong on description and prediction but lack deterministic and/or causal rigor, which ...
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2answers
132 views

Gravitational waves in other dimensions

I know this question is purely speculative, as we don't know if more dimensions do exist and also we do not know if gravity is indeed stronger in other dimensions (if they were to exist). But, one of ...
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2answers
64 views

Is the expanding of the universe also a cause which can induce gravitational waves from mass? [duplicate]

Gravitational waves arises when mass is rotating in another mass'orbital, in explosions and of course in case of colliding black holes. But are they also created when mass is moving and speeding ...
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88 views

Are gravitational waves effected by the curvature of space time (gravitational lensing)?

I have a basic question I can't seem to find anything on (I keep hearing about how gravity waves and gravitational lensing were both predicted by Einstein). We all know about the gravitational ...
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1answer
118 views

Are gravitons affected by the force of gravity? [closed]

1) Every particle, including photons, is affected by gravity. Would this be true for gravitons as well? 2) Gravitons should always move at the speed of light, so, if photons are red-shifted while ...
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0answers
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Why are the arms of the LIGO interferometer so long? [duplicate]

The LIGO experiment consists of two interferometers, where each one of them has two 4 km long arms. Within these, light is further trapped via Fabry-Pérot cavities to achieve a total path length of ...
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2answers
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What was the frequency of the gravitational wave recently detected, and why?

In one early Internet post there was a graphic that appeared to show the gravitational wave (pulse) at about 30 cps. And another video it was stated that the gravitational wave would be as high as ...
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Does a spinning mass follow a straight trajectory in empty space? Or is it curved like a golf ball?

Suppose that we can send to identical satellites (like Voyager 1&2) on identical trajectories. But one spins to the right while the other spins to the left. Would they follow the same trajectory?...
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1answer
927 views

G4v Gravitational Wave vs General Relativity vs LIGO Observation

CalTech emeritus professor Carver Mead produced an alternative prediction, to General Relativity, for gravitation wave observation which he published last year in anticipation of LIGO observations. ...
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Prospects for detection of gravitons?

With the announcement of the detection of gravitational waves, questions about the implications proliferate. Some relate to the possible existence of gravitons. The analogous relationship between ...
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59 views

How do gravitational waves and black holes interact?

Following the first detection of gravitational waves yesterday (11 Feb. 2016) by LIGO, I have a couple of questions about how gravitational waves and black holes interact. Assume that there is a ...
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36 views

Why does a curved spacetime result in a movement?

If gravity is not a force but a curvature of spacetime, where does the motion towards the center of gravity come from? To put it differently, why would two objects in a space fall towards each other ...
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1answer
86 views

Is it possible that there are still gravitational waves of the big bang?

We already discovered the cosmic background radiation what are the 'leftovers' of electromagnetic radiation of the big bang. Probably gravitational waves of the big bang (if they exists) would be to ...
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31 views

Bondi mass aspect

I'm looking for a good reference that defines the Bondi mass aspect and his relations to Bondi and ADM mass. Googling a bit I've not founded any satisfactory exposition of the subject. A short ...
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What is the effect of gravitational waves on time? [duplicate]

I always struggle with the time concept when it comes to general relativity. In the recent discovery the gravitational waves have been detected by the "displacement" of the mirrors and the difference ...