Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

25
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the graviton hypothetical?

Wikipedia lists the graviton as a hypothetical particle. I wonder whether graviton is indeed hypothetical or does its existence directly follow from modern physics? Does observation of gravitational ...
-2
votes
1answer
88 views

If the sun stopped burning, would we ever know it?

I read somewhere that since gravity moves at the speed of light, if the sun were to leave its position we would "know" about it through the absence of light and its gravitational effects on our planet ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How is gravitational lensing possible? [duplicate]

How is it possible that a force that affects mass (gravity) can affect massless particles like photons?
2
votes
3answers
78 views

At an instant, does a system of gravitational charges exhibit equivalent behavior to a time-reversed system of like electric charges?

Question: In principle, does a system of gravitational charges exhibit equivalent behavior to a time-reversed system of like electric charges? (At a single instance in time?) Additional Notes: I am ...
9
votes
1answer
369 views

Gravitational Constant in Newtonian Gravity vs. General Relativity

From my understanding, the gravitational constant $G$ is a proportionality constant used by Newton in his law of universal gravitation (which was based around Kepler's Laws), namely in the equation $F ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Position vs Time Function for a Falling Object Without Assumption of Constant Acceleration

If you have an asteroid for example and a planet, isolated from all other gravitational influence and initially at rest with respect to each other, how would you find a position vs time function for ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Effects of gravity on light [duplicate]

If gravity can bend light, why can't gravity slow light. At least momentarily? Wouldn't that give the illusion of the universe expansion speeding up?
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Does gravity act in the centre of the Earth? [duplicate]

If we we dig a hole from north pole to the south pole of the Earth and we throw a ball in this hole where would it stop? Will it come back on the surface or it will stop at the centre?
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Irrep decomposition of direct product of stress tensors

I have stress tensors direct product of the form $T^{ab}(x)T^{cd}(y)$. I want to write this in terms of a tensor $I^{abcd}$ in the form. $T^{ab}(x)T^{cd}(y)= I^{abcd}$. This is like decomposing the ...
2
votes
1answer
758 views

Does a black hole have any kind of mass?

Currently in my academics I am studying about the Gravitation. In the chapter I came across a term called the Escape Velocity (It's the velocity of any celestial body which is required by an object to ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Will we feel the gravity of a star 10 light years away for the next 10 years if, somehow, it vanishes today from its position? [duplicate]

I was watching a relativity video, and although I am not sure, I felt that it was trying to tell that the effect of gravitation of a body is instantaneous, in the sense that a sudden change in the ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

About parametrizing quadratic fluctuations in the metric about $AdS_2 \times S^2$

I am referring to the contents of page 20-23 of the paper, http://arxiv.org/abs/1108.3842.pdf Equation 4.5 seems to suggest that one wants to restrict the metric fluctuations $h$ to a subset such ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views

Gravity, a weak force?

Why is gravity such a weak force? It becomes strong for particles only at the Planck scale, around $10^{19}$ $\text{GeV}$, much above the electroweak scale ($100$ $\text{GeV}$, the energy scale ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

What is is a molecular/microscopic explanation for why a balloon rises in water?

If we consider a balloon full of air submerged in water then we all know that it will rise rapidly. I am having trouble understanding this at the level of individual molecules of air and water. What ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy?

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy? Does it have to do with dark matter or coarse graining in the universe? Is it unique to general relativity, or there are predictions from quantum mechanics as ...
4
votes
0answers
68 views

How to calculate gravity path integrals about an AdS background?

Suppose I have some Lagrangian of some higher derivative gravity coupled to a may be matter fields. Now I want to fluctuate it to quadratic order about an AdS background and calculate the 1-loop ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

How to calculate the Wald functional?

I want to calculate the Wald functional for arbitrary higher curvature Lagrangians - like getting equation 6.31 from 6.30 in this paper. A priori the above looks like an extremely complicated ...
1
vote
2answers
105 views

Principle of locality and forces

I have a silly confusion about the statement written in the link Einstein and Locality ''external influence on A has no direct influence on B; this is known as the Principle of Local Action.'' ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How exactly can we describe the normal force on a static person standing on earth's surface using general theory of relativity?

For planetary motion I can understand that the planets move along the geodesics e.g. the warped space-time geometry. Imagine that the moon gets suddenly stopped by some external force and comes to ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

What would happen if I was in the centre of the Earth? [duplicate]

If right in the centre of the Earth would be like a hole and I could teleport right there, what would happen to me? Would I explode, implode? My own theory is that maybe I would levitate because since ...
0
votes
3answers
122 views

What will happen after escaping earth's gravitational field?

Suppose that I escaped the gravitational field of earth. Then: am I going to be pulled by Sun's gravity?
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Is the concept of space-time curvature a recursive one? [duplicate]

A way some people explain (or try to explain) how gravity works is using space-time curvature: an object with high mass distorts the surrounding space-time plane like a bowling ball distorts a sheet ...
41
votes
5answers
6k views

How exactly does gravity work?

The electromagnetic force and strong and weak forces require particles like photons and gluons. But in case of gravity there is no such particle found. Every mass bearing object creates a ...
8
votes
2answers
223 views

Speed of gravity

Consider two objects presented in the figure below. Objects have equal masses and are separated by a distance of 60 light seconds. Assume that we move left object by 3 light seconds to the left in ...
0
votes
2answers
153 views

Does gravity actually contract space-time?

In the Big Crunch Theory it says that gravity (curvature in space-time) will stop the universe's expansion and gravity will cause the universe to contract on itself. My question is if gravity is a ...
2
votes
2answers
78 views

Lagrangian point or dark matter?

We know that spiral galaxies spin in a way such that we have to assume that dark matter is responsible for the extra mass required to do so. My question is, can Lagrangian points (L1 and L2) be used ...
-4
votes
1answer
72 views

Gravity proofs/can it be measured? [closed]

Is it possible to measure gravity other than cause and effect. Gravity is a principle which can only be measured by cause and effect. Ie since an object falls we assume there must be something pushing ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

How come gravity is $\mathcal{N}=8$? Why is graviton spin 2 [duplicate]

I never understood why supergravity $\mathcal N=8$, nor why the spin of a graviton is 2. I've been reading around but I still don't have a back-of-the-envolope understanding.
-2
votes
3answers
119 views

Could a photon travel faster than the speed of light in vacuum?

If the cosmic speed limit is the speed of light in vacuum, then what happens when a photon traveling through space meets gravity? Wouldn't gravity pull on the photon that's already traveling at max ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

What happens to atoms in extremely strong electromagnetic fields?

I know that strong gravitational fields on the order of neutron stars (at the crust) atoms get compressed so tightly, the empty space between them is significantly reduced and it becomes denser. ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Could the Earth be ejected when the sun burns out?

My younger brother came home from school today and told us at the dinner table that when the sun burns out the Earth could be ejected from its orbit. Skeptical, I asked his source. He quoted his ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Are combined masses in space, such as galaxies, considered to be uniform bodies? *In addition, a related question about force

If we were to calculate the force that one galaxy exerted onto another, would we consider the individual masses within the galaxies, or the masses of the galaxies as a whole? Do the individual stars ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Consequences of inverse square law with vast distances (Gravity); (in addition, is light speed broken)? [duplicate]

As is well known, the gravitational force between two masses is dependent on the spatial distance between them. Therefore, even at vast distances, the masses exert equal and opposite forces on one ...
4
votes
2answers
145 views

What is the difference between gravitation and electromagnetism?

I am currently studying electrodynamics. And when looking at Maxwell's equations, I don't see any reason, why we cannot apply them to gravity. We know that charges generate a force field that ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Does the earth gets closer to the sun?

We know that the sun loses an amount of it's mass equivalent to the amount of energy it produces, according to the E=mc² equation. so the sun is losing mass every second. Does this affect the ...
3
votes
2answers
65 views

Chemical effect on gravitation?

We know, that gravitation field of charged black hole is different than one of uncharged. I this true only for objects with singularity or is true for all objects? If true, then may we say, that ...
0
votes
3answers
95 views

Energy Required to Rip Spacetime

I have heard that the presence of an extremely strong gravitational field possesses the capacity to warp or tear spacetime and to potentially create a wormhole. Is any energy lost when spacetime is ...
1
vote
2answers
266 views

What is the shape of a rope hanging from two ends

If I hang a rope from two points that are at the same height above the ground, what is the mathematical function that describes the shape of the rope between the two points? Assuming the mass of the ...
2
votes
4answers
234 views

Where does the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime really come from?

I have been searching for quite a while but mostly found the answer: Einstein's genius. Quite unsatisfactory. I know and understand that the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime works. Furthermore I ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Falling from Earth's sphere of influence [duplicate]

How can I make a graph of an object falling from say, the Earth's sphere of influence, where acceleration(,a) is the real force of gravity at the objects radius? ie, using $$s=ut+\frac{1}{2}at^2$$ ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Square Cube Law?

I've heard about something called the square cube law. What is it? All I know of it is that it has something to do with mass of large objects and their gravitational influence.
6
votes
3answers
344 views

Can one assign an equivalence principle of some kind to the EM field?

Introduction: Consider the EM field. There was a time when the field was defined in a similar manner to that of the gravitational field. This changed when the view on gravitation evolved to this ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

How does the weak force between two neutrinos compare with their gravitational interaction?

In short, are there cases where the weak interaction between two neutrinos is actually smaller, in (absolute) magnitude, than their gravitational interaction? There is no principle that forbids this. ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

changes in horizontal velocity and the effect on time airborne (thus overcoming gravity)

I would like to know if a object is launched horizontally in the air at a lower speed and a higher speed, why does the higher speed keep it airborne longer. what are the forces and why does gravity ...
0
votes
2answers
97 views

What physical conditions would allow for this kind of perpetual seesaw

I'm working with a simulator(Box2D) and need to create these conditions. I have a perpetual seesaw with two objects on either side. I'd like for the following conditions to be met. The first ...
4
votes
1answer
33 views

Galaxy velocity curve

When deriving the relation between velocity of a star and its distance $r$ from the center of the galaxy, one assumes that the masses outside $r$ have no contribution and those inside $r$ give a force ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

maintaining atmosperic pressure on mars

how would mankind be able to maintain an earth like atmospheric pressure on mars since mars only has 1/3rd the mass? I am not, nor have i ever attended college, but am very curious.
0
votes
2answers
160 views

Is there a mistake in this example in my mechanics textbook?

This is a worked example in my mechanics book: But I think this worked example is wrong. In the 6th line. shouldn't $X=4R$ as the expression for distance above the surface is $(X-R)$ and when the ...
7
votes
1answer
102 views

Is $4 \pi G$ the true most fundamental gravitational constant? [closed]

Newton's law of gravitation is: $$F = G m_1 m_2 \frac{1}{r^2}$$ It looks simple and natural. But that's only in 3 dimensions. Let's look what happens in $n$ dimensions: $$n=2 : F = 2 G m_1 m_2 ...
1
vote
4answers
238 views

What was the Law of Gravity better explained by?

In mechanics, our professor made the declaration that "all laws of physics" have been disproven. He mentioned several examples including the Law of Gravity, mentioning briefly that it is better ...