Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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What is the pressure at the center of the Earth? (Or a neutron star)

The center of the Earth has microgravity and is thought to be solid and almost 6000 degrees hot. What is the pressure like there? The confusing thing, for the common man I suppose, is that there's no ...
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When objects fall along geodesic paths of curved space-time, why is there no force acting on them?

On cseligman.com, it is written that So, we see things falling with an acceleration which we call the acceleration of gravity,and thinking that we live in a straight line , uniformly moving or ...
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About binary stars and calculating velocity, period and radius of their orbit

I saw somewhere about being able to measure the velocity, period and radius of a binary star orbit by looking at red shift and blue shift. I understand it but can someone give me an example of ...
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Are time and gravity affected when at rest compared to free fall?

A falling object moves along a geodesic path ('straight path') in spacetime. When it comes to rest it now follows a 'curved path' through spacetime. Is the passage of time and force of gravity ...
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Gravitational Effect Versus the Speed of Light [duplicate]

If, for some reason, the sun were to suddenly disappear altogether, I would like to know the following: would we "feel" it first (i.e. being thrown into outer space due to no longer having anything ...
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The potential and the intensity of the gravitational field in the axis of a circular plate

Calculate the potential and the intensity of the gravitational field at a distance $x> 0$ in the axis of thin homogeneous circular plate of radius $a$ and mass $M$. Could anybody describe how to ...
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Neutrino unaffected by gravity

Are neutrinos affected by gravity? If not, could that be a plausible reason for a neutrino taking a shorter path than light, since light is affected by gravity?
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What is the relationship between $a$ and $m$

$a$ is defined in HERE What is the relationship between the length-scale $a$ and the mass $m$?
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Thought experiment on graviton breaking the speed of light [closed]

The effect of gravity travels at the speed of light. Suppose we can entangle a pair of gravitons (which are only theoretical, but who knows for sure?) and separate them over a vast distance. Hold on - ...
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Gravity anomaly in Lacnov, Slovakia: Gravity ashamed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qxwqNqL-Nc http://tvnoviny.sk/sekcia/spravy/technologie/v-lacnove-sa-predmety-kotulaju-do-kopca.html (Sorry: above links in Slovak.) Can someone explain this to me? ...
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What is the difference between gravitation and magnetism?

If you compress a large mass, on the order of a star or the Earth, into a very small space, you get a black hole. Even for very large masses, it is possible in principle for it to occupy a very small ...
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Why objects of different masses accelerate at the same speed under gravity [closed]

If you push massive object it accelerates slowly compared to object which is of same size but less density/mass. However, all objects do Accelerate at the same rate. ...
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Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
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Why is the Sun almost perfectly spherical?

Relatively recent measurements indicate that the Sun is nearly the roundest object ever measured. If scaled to the size of a beach ball, it would be so round that the difference between the widest ...
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What is the exact gravitational force between two masses including relativistic effects?

I was wondering if there is a closed-form formula for the force between two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ if relativistic effects are included. My understanding is that the classic formula $G \frac{m_1 ...
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Could gravity accelerate light? [duplicate]

Gravity causes anything with energy to accelerate toward the source. Black holes, for example, have such strong gravity that they pull in light and don't let any escape. But can acceleration still ...
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Why is Einstein gravity not renormalizable at two loops or more?

(I found this related Phys.SE post: Why is GR renormalizable to one loop?) I want to know explicitly how it comes that Einstein-Hilbert action in 3+1 dimensions is not renormalizable at two loops or ...
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Particle wavefunction and gravity

Suppose a particle has 50% probability of being at location $A$, and 50% probability being at location $B$ (see double slit experiment). According to QM the particle is at both $A$ and $B$ at the same ...
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Has the gravitational interaction of antimatter ever been examined experimentally?

I know that the gravitational interaction of antimatter is expected to be the same as normal matter. But my question is, has it ever been experimentally validated? I think it would not be a trivial ...
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Gravitational slingshot of light using a black hole/massive object

Wikipedia has this page on gravity assists using planets. In some cases this effect was used to accelerate the spacecraft to a higher velocity. This diagram shows this in a very oversimplified manner. ...
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Instantons and Non Perturbative Amplitudes in Gravity

In perturbative QFT in flat spacetime the perturbation expansion typically does not converge, and estimates of the large order behaviour of perturbative amplitudes reveals ambiguity of the ...
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951 views

Vacuum and repulsive gravity

How can one show from General Relativity that gravity is attractive force, and under which conditions it becomes repulsive, also why positive energy vacuum drives repulsive gravity?
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What makes the stars that are farther from the nucleus of the galaxy go faster than those in the middle?

It has no sense that stars that have a bigger radius and apparently less angular speed($\omega$) goes faster than the ones near the center.
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Event Horizon violability?

Is the "event horizon" of a black hole potentially violable? Black holes are commonly described as being unidirectional (matter / energy goes in, but doesn't come out), but is the event horizon of a ...
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Is anti-gravity possible in theoretical physics?

Is anti-gravity possible in string theory? I have read some articles about scientists making assumptions about the existence of anti-gravity, but is it possible in string theory?
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The gravitational constant $G$ theoretically?

We know all that the gravitational constant is $$G=6.67428±0.00067\times 10^{-11}m^{3} kg^{-1} s^{-2}.$$ But can we calculate it theoretically?
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What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
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How close does light have to be, to orbit a perfect sphere the size and mass of Earth?

The moon orbits Earth at about $380,\!000 \,\mathrm{km}$ away from it, at around $3,600 \,\mathrm{km}$ an hour. I was thinking, with light traveling at $300,\!000 \,\mathrm{km/s}$, how close to ...
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Why is it hard to detect a black hole

I've read in some texts that we can't directly observe a black hole in space because not even light can escape from its gravity. Some of the indirect observational methods mentioned are, gravitational ...
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Speed of light in general relativity

My question has a few parts concerning the speed of light in general relativity. Firstly, time changes in response to gravity and speed. Therefore, as gravity effects time in an area of space, should ...
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Does the mass of a star change as it collapses into a black hole?

I know (I think!) that when a really big star collapses on itself it creates a black hole. My question: When a star collapses, is the mass equal to the mass of the star when it's not a black hole? Or ...
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Is the quantization of gravity necessary for a quantum theory of gravity? Part II

(At the suggestion of the user markovchain, I have decided to take a very large edit/addition to the original question, and ask it as a separate question altogether.) Here it is: I have since ...
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Are objects in a gravitational well shortened?

Bob is in a gravitational potential well, he moves a long vertical stick up and down a distance of 1 meters. Alice observes the upper end of the stick, at upper location. There is the phenomenon of ...
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What does it mean for objects to follow the curvature of space?

In science documentaries that touch on general relativity, it is often said that gravitational pull isn't an actual a pull (as described by classical physics), but rather one body travelling in a ...
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Why should mass be attractive in nature?

Why does a mass attract all the masses around it? Why should't it repel or just stay calm? Why should it be like that?
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Variation in measurements of $g$ on the Earth's surface due to the Moon's gravity

A book, Exercises for the Feynman Lectures on Physics, has recently been published. It consists of homework problems to provide practice with the techniques and concepts used in the famous Feynman ...
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What's the biggest cube you could have before gravity rounded it?

I took this question from Quora because it seems interesting and this community would have some fun with it. I would assume that one would use the modulus formulas for force to counteract the gravity, ...
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How does gravity affect sound waves? [closed]

Someone asked me this question and I don't think I gave him an adequate answer (I was trying to think of the extreme case - that of neutron stars)
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Virtual Photon transmission speed of a Static Electric Field?

In the case of a non-accelerating point charge "A" of stable velocity, its static field is treated as though it is instantaneously present at a distance, i.e. a second point charge "B" will react to ...
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How does energy convert to matter? [duplicate]

To my understanding, matter and energy are one and the same. Shifting from $E$ to $M$ in Einstein's famous equation requires only a large negative acceleration. If $M$ really is $E/c^2$, does that ...
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8answers
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Do you feel gravity? [closed]

I have been reading a few articles about the question why we don't feel/notice gravity in everyday life, but I couldn't understand why exactly we don't feel/notice it, that is, why we don't feel a ...
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Will photon's energy be exactly same after million years?

If photon will travel for million years without collisions, what subtle effects can be accumulated ? Gravity fields affect trajectory, but is energy completely intact after fly by ? Photon has its ...
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Force inversely proportional to the squared distance

Newton's law of universal gravitation: "Newton's law of universal gravitation states that every point mass in the universe attracts every other point mass with a force that is directly proportional to ...
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Why is Jupiter so sharply defined?

In photographs of Jupiter, the limb seems extremely definite. Being a gas giant, my naive self thinks that the atmosphere should have a more gradual cut off, creating a hazy effect similar to that on ...
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Could the acceleration of universe expansion be caused by gravity itself?

Dark energy is suggested to be a repulsive force in the universe causing an accelerated expansion. If the amount of mass outside our observable universe is greater than inside (higher mass density), ...
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What physical forces pull/press water upwards in vegetation?

Each spring enormous amounts of water rise up in trees and other vegetation. What causes this stream upwards? Edit: I was under the impression that capillary action is a key factor: the original ...
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What is the general relativity explanation for why objects at the center of the Earth are weightless?

The idea that as you move through the earth you get a symmetric cancelling of gravitational acceleration which approaches zero acceleration due to gravity at the center of the earth makes a lot of ...
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How would gravity change on a planet rotating around itself very fast?

Let's take a planet identical to Earth, but with rotation speed multiplied by ten thousand. What would happen with the gravity if it was spinning madly around itself? Would the centrifugal force make ...
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What is the likelihood of ever discovering the graviton?

How would one look for and confirm existence of a graviton? Someone was speaking to me about perhaps one day discovering the graviton, but to me it seems unlikely, although I'm young and essentially ...
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Why is Higgs Boson given the name “The God Particle”?

Higgs Boson (messenger particle of Higgs field) accounts for inertial mass, not gravitational mass. So, how could it account for formation of universe as we know it today? I think, gravity accounts ...