Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
3answers
7k views

How does gravity affect sound waves? [closed]

Someone asked me this question and I don't think I gave him an adequate answer (I was trying to think of the extreme case - that of neutron stars)
2
votes
1answer
109 views

Virtual Photon transmission speed of a Static Electric Field?

In the case of a non-accelerating point charge "A" of stable velocity, its static field is treated as though it is instantaneously present at a distance, i.e. a second point charge "B" will react to ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

How does energy convert to matter? [duplicate]

To my understanding, matter and energy are one and the same. Shifting from $E$ to $M$ in Einstein's famous equation requires only a large negative acceleration. If $M$ really is $E/c^2$, does that ...
2
votes
2answers
12k views

Newtonian gravity vs. general relativity: exactly how wrong is Newton?

Is there a simple function I can use to describe the difference between simple Newtonian dynamics and the actual observed motion? Or maybe some ratios for common examples of, say, the motion of stars ...
2
votes
6answers
4k views

Do you feel gravity?

I have been reading a few articles about the question why we don't feel/notice gravity in everyday life, but I couldn't understand why exactly we don't feel/notice it, that is, why we don't feel a ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Force inversely proportional to the squared distance

Newton's law of universal gravitation: "Newton's law of universal gravitation states that every point mass in the universe attracts every other point mass with a force that is directly proportional to ...
14
votes
2answers
440 views

Why is Jupiter so sharply defined?

In photographs of Jupiter, the limb seems extremely definite. Being a gas giant, my naive self thinks that the atmosphere should have a more gradual cut off, creating a hazy effect similar to that on ...
8
votes
5answers
968 views

Two orbiting planets in perpendicular planes

Inspired by this question. Can a 3 body problem, starting with two planets orbiting a larger one (so massive it may be taken to stand still) in perpendicular planes, be stable? Is there known an ...
7
votes
2answers
843 views

What physical forces pull/press water upwards in vegetation?

Each spring enormous amounts of water rise up in trees and other vegetation. What causes this stream upwards? Edit: I was under the impression that capillary action is a key factor: the original ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the likelihood of ever discovering the graviton?

How would one look for and confirm existence of a graviton? Someone was speaking to me about perhaps one day discovering the graviton, but to me it seems unlikely, although I'm young and essentially ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Why is Higgs Boson given the name “The God Particle”?

Higgs Boson (messenger particle of Higgs field) accounts for inertial mass, not gravitational mass. So, how could it account for formation of universe as we know it today? I think, gravity accounts ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

How does the curvature of spacetime induce gravitational attraction?

I don't know how to ask this more clearly than in the title.
5
votes
1answer
198 views

Does compression of matter increase gravity?

Black holes are thought to originate when a star burns out and collapses to a smaller physical size. This compresses it's matter, but would that increase it's gravity? And would it be enough to ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What would happen if I take a glass of water in space?

What would happen if I take a glass of water in space i.e. outside the gravitational influence of earth? My teacher said that the water would vaporize but I am not completely satisfied by the answer. ...
3
votes
1answer
412 views

Why are there Gravitons among the modes of oscillation in String Theory?

Why are gravitons present among the modes of oscillation of the 'strings' in String Theory?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it possible/correct to describe electromagnetism using curved space(-time)? [duplicate]

Comparing the simples form of the forces of both phenomena: the law of Newton for gravitation $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, and the Coulomb law for electrostatics $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, one might think ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Neutron star: free fall acceleration

The textbook from which I teach physics at the end of secondary school, has a question about a neutron star: $M_{star}=1.4\cdot M_{sun}$, radius 15km. "Calculate the free fall acceleration at the ...
2
votes
2answers
107 views

Curvature gravity and a falling apple? [duplicate]

I know very little of physics after Einstein. I am aware of that Einstein's gravity theory says that the existence of matters creates curvature of a space-time, so that our Earth orbits our Sun. I ...
2
votes
3answers
139 views

Gravity and bottomless pits [duplicate]

Assuming that someone is theoretically able to make a hole through the center of a large planet, and then jumps down the hole, what will happen? Given my understanding of gravity and energy, my ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

Do we have theories about why gravity exists/HOW it works?

For years I have been very fascinated by the "mystery" aspect of gravity. Functionally, we understand it perfectly for our all applications, but in my (limited to undergrad General Physics 3 quarters) ...
2
votes
2answers
580 views

Speed of light in a vacuum

I see many references to the speed of light in a vacuum implying that it is only truly a constant measurement in a vacuum. I can live with that, but what kind of vacuum? Are we still talking about ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

How can the Schwarzschild radius of the universe be 13.7 billion light years?

So i was reading about Schwarzschild radius on Wiki and I found a interesting thing written there link. It says that the S. radius of the universe is as big as the size of the universe? How is this ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Would a light or a heavy ball roll fastest down a slope?

A small, light ball and a larger, heavier ball are released from the top of a slope. Which will move further? which will come down faster?
0
votes
3answers
239 views

General relativity theory [duplicate]

As I understand general relativity theory (please correct me if I'm wrong), time becomes dilated and space becomes compressed around mass, and this is responsible for gravity. I'm struggling with ...
-5
votes
2answers
305 views

Why did Standard Model never sense a requirement to include gravitational quantum? [closed]

Standard Model is advanced (lorentz invariant) version of Quantum physics. It tried to include everything which came in the way while understanding quantum world. It even didn't bother to include ...
13
votes
4answers
665 views

Coulomb's Law in the presence of a strong gravitational field

I was under the impression that the $1/r^2$ falloff of various forces were because of the way the area of a expanding sphere scales. But that strict $1/r^2$ falloff would only be globally true in a ...
11
votes
5answers
3k views

What happens to light and mass in the center of a black hole?

I know that black holes are "black" because nothing can escape it due to the massive gravity, but I am wondering if there are any theories as to what happens to the light or mass that enters a black ...
8
votes
3answers
385 views

Does MOND make good predictions?

Well, it does according to this preprint for certain scales. What would be a simple way to explain MOND to a layman? Does it ignore mainstream physics? How much?
7
votes
3answers
170 views

Leading-order cause of diurnal (not semidiurnal) variations in $g$?

The following graph shows the result of a very impressive differential measurement of the gravitational field in Boulder, Colorado, over a period of a couple of days. Floris got it from a ...
7
votes
3answers
275 views

What exactly is the microgravity field in orbit?

The ISS and other objects in orbit still experience small acceleration outside from the perfect line of orbit (of the system CM). For instance, two objects in the ISS that are let to be at rest will ...
6
votes
2answers
195 views

Speed of gravity in cosmological codes and ephemeris generation

There are few questions in Phys.SE concerning the speed of gravity, and the answers are traditionally that the speed of gravity equals to the speed of light. But in that case I have three more ...
6
votes
2answers
405 views

Is Dyson Sphere a stable construction?

Suppose that a star is encompassed by a Dyson Sphere. Do we need a position control system for the Dyson Sphere to keep its origin always aligned with the center of the star? Will it stay aligned ...
5
votes
3answers
588 views

Is it possible to have a floating bullet in the air?

I've been asking myself a question for quite some time : say that a bullet gets out of a gun at 900 km/h (I'm european, hence the metric system). say a train could go in a straight line at 900 km/h ...
4
votes
3answers
275 views

How does relativity explain gravity, without assuming gravity [duplicate]

I have seen the "objects pull down on space-time" explanations, but they assume a "pull down" force themselves. Could anyone explain the space-time explanation without assuming gravity in the first ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Place each foot on a scale: can you add the two to find your weight?

I frequent a blog from a British psychologist, and every Friday he likes to pose an interesting puzzle or riddle. The Monday after that he posts the answer. They're good fun, and IANAP but this week's ...
4
votes
1answer
6k views

How to debunk 'The Electric Universe'? [closed]

My father is a generally intelligent person, however he has latched onto a theory which I believe to be completely incorrect. He doesn't believe in gravity, but rather subscribes to an 'Electrical ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

Gravitational Effect Versus the Speed of Light [duplicate]

If, for some reason, the sun were to suddenly disappear altogether, I would like to know the following: would we "feel" it first (i.e. being thrown into outer space due to no longer having anything ...
2
votes
2answers
211 views

Why don't black holes within a galaxy pull in the stars of the galaxy

visit http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/what-is-a-black-hole-k4.html If black holes can pull even light, why cant they pull the stars in the galaxy?
2
votes
1answer
202 views

Sideways motion between a vertical launch from a planet and landing [duplicate]

I saw a video some days ago (Hello Kitty in Space) of a schoolgirl successfully launching a balloon into space which later popped and landed ~47 km from launch site. If I vertically launch an object ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Time taken for gravity of a distant object to interact with a newly created particle? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: The speed of gravity Does gravity travel at the speed of light? Imagine there is a large mass $m_1$ (e.g. a star) 1 light-year away from us. It is stable, stationary ...
2
votes
3answers
311 views

Can a photon be made to orbit a known (or undiscovered theoretical) body?

Can a photon through some process be made to orbit a celestial or any other object? Two follow-up questions. Can this orbit be described as the photon crossing its own path. Will this ...
2
votes
1answer
243 views

What is the mass of individual components in a gravitationally bound system?

When material of rest mass M falls from infinity onto a black hole accretion disk, it gets heated and then emits so much light that the energy radiated away can measure up to about 30% or so of M c^2. ...
1
vote
2answers
712 views

What is space made of?

General Relativity posits that matter curves spacetime, such that geodesics point towards the object in question, hence, gravity. Now, how does matter do this? What is spacetime "made of", anyway, ...
1
vote
3answers
150 views

About the speed of light and gravity

I read (I think ) that part of relativity theory is that a strong gravitational field distorts the uniform passage of time. If this is true and a lightwave 'travelling' to Earth passes a star near ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

No uncertainty for standard gravitational acceleration?

The other day I asked about the uncertainty of light, and this issue triggered me to start looking into other physical constants and try to understand why other constants have no uncertainty. One of ...
1
vote
0answers
121 views

Derivation of equations of motion in Nordstrom's theory of scalar gravity?

Nordstrom's theory of a particle moving in the presence of a scalar field $\varphi (x)$ is given by $$ S = -m\int e^{\varphi (x)}\sqrt{\eta_{\alpha \beta}\frac{dx^{\alpha}}{d ...
1
vote
1answer
711 views

Can electromagnetic radiation (i.e. photons) produce gravity? [duplicate]

I don't want to play with physical laws in a frivolous way. Assuming that the nature of matter and energy is the same, can a high density of highly energetic photons produce a gravity force? We do ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

The potential and the intensity of the gravitational field in the axis of a circular plate

Calculate the potential and the intensity of the gravitational field at a distance $x> 0$ in the axis of thin homogeneous circular plate of radius $a$ and mass $M$. Could anybody describe how to ...
0
votes
1answer
177 views

Does Newton's first law apply also to non-newtonian physics?

I think I understand than an example of Newton's first law (intertial frames) would be a single asteroid in vaccum with no other bodies around, a comet in such free space or likewise. Then I think the ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

How does gravity effects both time and light if they have no mass [duplicate]

I've been reading about how black holes can effect both time and light with gravity. So I was wondering, doesn't something have to have mass to be effected by gravity? And if so, does this mean both ...