Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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What is the mass of individual components in a gravitationally bound system?

When material of rest mass M falls from infinity onto a black hole accretion disk, it gets heated and then emits so much light that the energy radiated away can measure up to about 30% or so of M c^2. ...
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About the speed of light and gravity

I read (I think ) that part of relativity theory is that a strong gravitational field distorts the uniform passage of time. If this is true and a lightwave 'travelling' to Earth passes a star near ...
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80 views

Derivation of equations of motion in Nordstrom's theory of scalar gravity?

Nordstrom's theory of a particle moving in the presence of a scalar field $\varphi (x)$ is given by $$ S = -m\int e^{\varphi (x)}\sqrt{\eta_{\alpha \beta}\frac{dx^{\alpha}}{d ...
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374 views

Can electromagnetic radiation (i.e. photons) produce gravity? [duplicate]

I don't want to play with physical laws in a frivolous way. Assuming that the nature of matter and energy is the same, can a high density of highly energetic photons produce a gravity force? We do ...
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The potential and the intensity of the gravitational field in the axis of a circular plate

Calculate the potential and the intensity of the gravitational field at a distance $x> 0$ in the axis of thin homogeneous circular plate of radius $a$ and mass $M$. Could anybody describe how to ...
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Similarity between the Coulomb force and Newton's gravitational force

Coulomb force and gravitational force has the same governing equation. So they should be same in nature. A moving electric charge creates magnetic field, so a moving mass should create some force ...
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Would a light or a heavy ball roll fastest down a slope?

A small, light ball and a larger, heavier ball are released from the top of a slope. Which will move further? which will come down faster?
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No uncertainty for standard gravitational acceleration?

The other day I asked about the uncertainty of light, and this issue triggered me to start looking into other physical constants and try to understand why other constants have no uncertainty. One of ...
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Jumping in an elevator?

I've always been under the impression that jumping in an elevator wouldn't help at all, especially after reading a snippet of physics where Einstein said that free fall was identical to zero gravity. ...
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What is a natural movement of a ball on a upward curve (the two arrow lines pointing upward) given no external force?

If you drop a ball down a upward curving parabolic ramp, what is the expected movement of the ball? Assume the ball is set into motion with no external force. Would it go all the way from point A to ...
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How do I explain to a 6 year old why people on the other side of the Earth don't fall off? [closed]

Today a friend's 6 year old sister asked me the question "why don't people on the other side of the earth fall off?". I tried to explain that the Earth is a huge sphere and there's a special force ...
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Why would spacetime curvature cause gravity?

It is fine to say that for an object flying past a massive object, the spacetime is curved by the massive object, and so the object flying past follows the curved path of the geodesic, so it "appears" ...
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Why is gravity such a unique force?

My knowledge on this particular field of physics is very sketchy, but I frequently hear of a theoretical "graviton", the quantum of the gravitational field. So I guess most physicists' assumption is ...
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What is a good mathematical description of the Non-renormalizability of gravity?

By now everybody knows that gravity is non-renormalizable, what is often lacking is a simplified mathematical description of what that means. Can anybody provide such a description?
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Why do we still need to think of gravity as a force?

Firstly I think shades of this question have appeared elsewhere (like here, or here). Hopefully mine is a slightly different take on it. If I'm just being thick please correct me. We always hear ...
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When a star becomes a black hole, does its gravitational field strength become stronger?

I've seen in a documentary that when a star collapses and becomes a black hole, it starts to eat the planets around. But it has the same mass, so how does its gravitational field strength increase?
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Does antimatter curve spacetime in the opposite direction as matter?

According to the Dirac equation, antimatter is the negative energy solution to the following relation: $$E^2 = p^2 c^2 + m^2 c^4.$$ And according to general relativity, the Einstein tensor (which ...
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Can I survive a free fall using a ramp and a rope?

Can I survive a free fall by carrying a very light and resistant ramp using a rope? Note: lets assume the ramp is a little bit heavier at the bottom and I am very skilled at making it always land ...
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733 views

Particle wavefunction and gravity

Suppose a particle has 50% probability of being at location $A$, and 50% probability being at location $B$ (see double slit experiment). According to QM the particle is at both $A$ and $B$ at the same ...
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Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
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476 views

How do spiral arms form?

Why aren't all spinning galaxies shaped as discs as my young mind would expect? I understand how the innermost parts of a galaxy spin faster than the outer parts, and that could explain why some ...
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842 views

Why is Einstein gravity not renormalizable at two loops or more?

(I found this related Phys.SE post: Why is GR renormalizable to one loop?) I want to know explicitly how it comes that Einstein-Hilbert action in 3+1 dimensions is not renormalizable at two loops or ...
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Would there be time dilation at the point where two gravitational fields cancel each other out?

My question is very simple, and most likely a stupid one: One observer is at a point in space were the gravitational force form massive bodies (or a single massive body) cancel each-other out. The ...
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How Does Hubble's Expansion Affect Two Rope-Tied Galaxies?

Suppose we have two galaxies that are sufficiently far apart so that the distance between them increases due to Hubble's expansion. If I were to connect these two galaxies with a rope, would there be ...
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Where does gravity get its energy from?

I would like to know where gravity gets its energy to attract physical bodies? I know that the law of conservation states that total energy of an isolated system cannot change. So gravity has to be ...
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241 views

Possibility of “graviballs”?

Looking at the relevant wikipedia page, one can read that the graviton should be massless. Is it 100 % certain that it is massless or is there room in any "nonstandard" models for a tiny non-zero mass ...
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Slowing of time under gravity

I am not calling this gravitational time dilation because that is a relativistic effect due to the equivalence principle. Now imagine two light clocks (a clock that ticks due to light) are placed ...
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Is anti-gravity possible in theoretical physics?

Is anti-gravity possible in string theory? I have read some articles about scientists making assumptions about the existence of anti-gravity, but is it possible in string theory?
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Is there a way to fill Tank 2 from Tank 1 through Gravity alone?

I am a newbie in water system design but I am currently faced with the exact situation below on my land, and I need to know whether gravity alone is sufficient in order to fill Tank 2 from Tank 1, as ...
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570 views

Gravity theories with the equivalence principle but different from GR

Einstein's general relativity assumes the equivalence of acceleration and gravitation. Is there a general class of gravity theories that have this property but disagree with general relativity? Will ...
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221 views

What are the arguments for gravity not being a force? (in quantum gravity)

In quantum gravity the standard assumtion is that gravity is a force, although there is a small but persistent group of theorethical physicists who think otherwise. What gives us the motivation to ...
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Incompatibility Between Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

Why does Gravity distort space and time while the electromagnetic, strong, and weak forces do not? Does this have to do with why Quantum Mechanics and Relativity are incompatible?
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Why can't airplanes just keep going up? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do space crafts take off with rockets instead of just ascending like an aircraft until they reach space? Ignoring that the engines only work in air, so say its a ...
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Is the number of wavelengths of light spanning a distance invariant with respect to spacetime distortion?

I was recently asked by a friend how the expansion of spacetime affects photons. I gave him what I feel is a satisfactory general response, but it got me wondering how, exactly to calculate this ...
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Classical theories and AdS/CFT

When I was editing the Physics.SE tag wiki for ads-cft, I initially wrote something on the lines of : The AdS/CFT correspondence is a special case of the holographic principle. It states that ...
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Does everything with mass or energy have a gravitational pull?

As small as it may be, does every 'thing' have a gravitational pull? That is, something with mass or energy. No matter how obsolete or negligible it may be, is it there? If so, how is it calculated? ...
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Falling Electron

Suppose there are two objects in the universe. Earth, with a gravitational acceleration of g = 9.8m/s/s, and a typical electron. The electron is dropped from a certain height, say 1000m above the ...
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How long would it take to travel through a wormhole?

Assuming wormholes exist and you put some matter into one, how long would it take to reach the other end versus how far apart the two ends are? Basically, by how much does a wormhole stretch ...
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How stupid is this theory of gravity? [closed]

As will be evident, I am not a physicist. I've always been interested in physics but my education tapered out with general relativity and basic quantum mechanics, years ago. Several years ago a sort ...
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Could we make a trebuchet that could launch objects to a stable orbit?

Inspired by this xkcd, which calculated the energy requirements for accelerating individual humans to escape velocity (regardless of consideration for what that would do to your organs), I am ...
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About parametrizing quadratic fluctuations in the metric about $AdS_2 \times S^2$

I am referring to the contents of page 20-23 of the paper, http://arxiv.org/abs/1108.3842.pdf Equation 4.5 seems to suggest that one wants to restrict the metric fluctuations $h$ to a subset such ...
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Does a guitar sound different in zero (or micro) gravity?

Seeing a video of astronaut Chris Hadfield playing a guitar on the International Space Station made me wonder if a guitar or other stringed instrument played in zero-G would sound any different than ...
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Can gravity be shielded, like electromagnetism?

If I remember well, they said that it can't, but I do not know why. Yes, I meant if gravity can be shielded using something like a Faraday cage (or something else?). Thank you.
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Would Portal-style portals transmit gravity? [closed]

In the video game Portal, there are often puzzles which must be solved by gaining a large amount of momentum. Typically, this is accomplished by putting one portal on the ground and another directly ...
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680 views

Maximum time difference between clocks in a gravity field

From Surely you must be joking, Mr Feynman. You blast off in a rocket which has a clock on board, and there's a clock on the ground. The idea is that you have to be back when the clock on ...
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Charging a black hole?

What would happen if we have a black hole and we start shooting at it a single electron at a time, and go on doing it forever? Would the electrons start to bounce off eventually?
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Calculating Orbital Vectors in the Future

For the 2D space simulator that I am writing (please note, it is not at all homework), I require formulas that will give me the location and velocity of a spaceship, relative to the parent celestial ...
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Questions about the Jeans length

I have a couple of questions about the Jeans length. Suppose the universe has a homogeneous energy density, except there's a spherical region that is overdense. I understand that if the region is ...
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Do residents of the Hudson Bay area have more time?

Apparently there is a gravity anomaly in the Hudson Bay Area in Canada: gravity is "missing" or it is slightly less than it is in the rest of the world. Does that mean that things in the Hudson Bay ...
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Source term of the Einstein field equation

My copy of Feynman's "Six Not-So-Easy Pieces" has an interesting introduction by Roger Penrose. In that introduction (copyright 1997 according to the copyright page), Penrose complains that Feynman's ...