Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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What is light cone singularity? Has it any relation with light like singularity?

I thought light like singularity is where the geodesics end on a lightlike hypersurface and can't be extended anymore. I guess its different than light cone singularity. Lot's of places have mention ...
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Why doesn't Brooklyn expand? (Or “Is the expansion of the universe kinematic?”) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why space expansion affects matter? Imagine two tiny spacecrafts that are moving with the Hubble flow and so are moving away from each other. Let's assume that they've ...
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Is it theoretically possible to shield gravitational fields or waves?

Electromagnetic waves can be shielded by a perfect conductor. What about gravitational fields or waves?
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Why do rockets have multiple stages?

What is the advantage for rockets to have multiple stages? Wouldn't a single stage with the same amount of fuel weigh less? Note I would like a quantitative answer, if possible :-)
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Would you be weightless at the center of the Earth?

If you could travel to the center of the Earth (or any planet), would you be weightless there?
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Bubbles in zero gravity

What happens if you blow bubbles into a glass of lemonade on the international space station? Since you are weightless in orbit, there's no up, down, left nor right. We define down on the Earth ...
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Why do helium filled balloons move away from the Earth?

From my understanding objects do not fall but are pulled to the earth from gravity. With this in mind, I can't understand why if helium filled balloons are not pulled by gravity then shouldn't they ...
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Tesla's theory of gravity

I was reading up on Tesla's Wikipedia page last night, and I came across this: When he was 81, Tesla stated he had completed a "dynamic theory of gravity". He stated that it was "worked out ...
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Quantum Gravity and Calculations of Mercury's Perihelion

In an astronomy forum that I frequent, I have been having a discussion where the state of quantum gravity research came up. I claimed that Loop Quantum Gravity theories couldn't prove GR in the ...
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How come gas molecules don't settle down?

If the earth's gravity exerts a net downward gravitational force on all air molecules, how come the molecules don't eventually lose their momentum and all settle down? How is the atmosphere is still ...
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Orbital mechanics of Dragon's Egg

In the novel Dragon's Egg, the human crew use one asteroid to swing other asteroids in place to counter the gravity of the neutron star. I understood that it was similar to a gravity sling shot, but I ...
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Why space expansion affects matter?

If space itself is expanding, then why would it have any effect on matter (separates distant galaxies)? Space is "nothing", and if "nothing" becomes bigger "nothing" it's still a "nothing" that ...
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Why do liquids separate in space?

I've seen videos of people in space (on ISS) who squeeze a bottle or something and liquid comes out, it then separates into smaller balls. Why is this surely it should stay pretty much together ...
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A Question on Singularity

I am not aware of GR, but due to curiosity i have a question in my mind. Please let me know if it is inappropriate to ask here. My question is about singularity. I am under the assumption that ...
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Could gravity be an emergent property of nature?

Sorry if this question is naive. It is just a curiosity that I have. Are there theoretical or experimental reasons why gravity should not be an emergent property of nature? Assume a standard model ...
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Mass distribution driven by gravitational field

In a gravitational field, should the mass distributions always behave well?
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Resonance in a gravitational field?

Assume that there are only well behaved functions as mass distributions, and there are no other forces except gravitation. Is it than possible to create an arrangement where a variation of a certain ...
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Particle wavefunction and gravity

Suppose a particle has 50% probability of being at location $A$, and 50% probability being at location $B$ (see double slit experiment). According to QM the particle is at both $A$ and $B$ at the same ...
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Event Horizon violability?

Is the "event horizon" of a black hole potentially violable? Black holes are commonly described as being unidirectional (matter / energy goes in, but doesn't come out), but is the event horizon of a ...
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How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?

There is this famous example about the order difference between gravitational force and EM force. All the gravitational force of Earth is just countered by the electromagnetic force between the ...
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Simulate a physical impact of objects made of finite, small elements

I want to simulate an impact between two bodies according to gravity, and eventually considering other forces to stick matter together. I'd like to use python to do this, but I am open to ...
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Why do we define such a thing as singularity?

According to general relativity, an observer not in the close proximity of a black hole, observing a mass fall into that black hole, will never see that mass cross event horizon(it will gradually fade ...
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Noticing that Newtonian gravity and electrostatics are equivalent, is there also a relationship between the general relativity and electrodynamics?

In classical mechanics, we had Newton's law of gravity $F \propto \frac{Mm}{r^2}$. Because of this, all laws of classical electrostatics applied to classical gravity if we assumed that all charges ...
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How does gravity escape a black hole?

My understanding is that light can not escape from within a black hole (within the event horizon). I've also heard that information cannot propagate faster than the speed of light. It would seem to ...
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Imagine a long bar floating in space. What force does it exert on itself in the middle due to gravity?

Problem If you had a long bar floating in space, what would be the compressive force at the centre of the bar, due to the self-weight of both ends? Diagram - what is the force at point X in the ...
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Is gravity a vector or tensor function and does gravity have velocity or is it instantaneous?

If gravity exists quantumly it must take up space, have frequency, velocity, etc. Perhaps gravity is too fine a frquency for detection.
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Is it possible/correct to describe electromagnetism using curved space(-time)? [duplicate]

Comparing the simples form of the forces of both phenomena: the law of Newton for gravitation $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, and the Coulomb law for electrostatics $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, one might think ...
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Nature of gravity: gravitons, curvature of space-time or both?

General relativity tells us that what we perceive as gravity is curvature of space-time. On the other hand (as I understand it) gravity can be understood as a force between objects which are ...
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Gravity on a doughnut-shaped/Möbius planet

How different would the effects of gravity be if the planet we're on is in the shape of a torus (doughnut-shaped)? For an (approximately) spherical planet, it's slightly clear that objects would tend ...
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What physical forces pull/press water upwards in vegetation?

Each spring enormous amounts of water rise up in trees and other vegetation. What causes this stream upwards? Edit: I was under the impression that capillary action is a key factor: the original ...
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Is gravity a force and if so what is its opposite?

For every force there is an equal force in the opposite direction on another body, correct? So when the Suns gravity acts on Earth where is the opposite and equal force? I also have the same ...
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Is Newton's Law of Gravity consistent with General Relativity?

By 'Newton's Law of Gravity', I am referring to The magnitude of the force of gravity is proportional to the product of the mass of the two objects and inversely proportional to their distance ...