Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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Detailing why a scalar gravity theory predicts no bending of light [closed]

I want to understand in technical detail why a particular scalar theory for gravity predicts no bending of light. It is left as a question, either in "Gravitation" by Misner, Thorne, and Wheeler, ...
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457 views

Are there models/simulations of antigravitational antimatter-galaxies?

In the comments to another question's answer, I started wondering: Assuming antimatter possessed negative gravitational mass§ (which is not proven impossible to date, though deemed unlikely), ...
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3answers
1k views

If an object fell from the moon [duplicate]

Ignoring the moons gravity, if an object sitting still (relative to the Earth, i.e. not in orbit) was dropped from the moon. How long would it take to hit the Earth?
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5answers
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Does antimatter curve spacetime in the opposite direction as matter?

According to the Dirac equation, antimatter is the negative energy solution to the following relation: $$E^2 = p^2 c^2 + m^2 c^4.$$ And according to general relativity, the Einstein tensor (which ...
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0answers
212 views

On-shell action in asymptotically AdS space

Consider a field theory coupled with gravity described by the action: $S=\int d^Dx \sqrt{-g} \left( \mathcal{R}-\Lambda+\mathcal{L}_m[\phi] \right)$, with the requirement that g must be ...
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Vertical and horizontal components of forces and vectors

I'm getting a bit confused when finding components of vectors and forces. In problems for vectors, I've always known that if you want to get the components of a vector, you would use the following: ...
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1answer
145 views

Is self gravitation theoretically impossible?

Is it theoretically possible to create some system such that the energy distribution creates a gravitational potential offset from its center of mass (or energy?) so that the body continually 'falls' ...
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2answers
188 views

Why isn't all of the dust in a nebula used in the formation of a star?

I was watching a show on discovery and according to it, in a nebula the dust and gases slowly come together and as the gravity increases and the pressure rises in the core the gases fuse together and ...
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1answer
148 views

Reduction in gravity from photon exchange

Let's say you have two bodies at are held at rest relative to each other exchanging (real, not virtual) photons back and forth. Then we let them go (maybe push them apart slightly), so they will ...
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0answers
62 views

Where are the L3, L4, and L5 points of a hyperbolic orbit?

Do the L3, L4, L5 points exist in hyperbolic orbits? If yes, then where do they lie?
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1answer
897 views

How does time relate to mass and velocity

I understand that the larger the mass the greater gravity is and the slower time is, as well the faster an object is traveling the slower time passes. My question is that since the faster an object ...
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1answer
1k views

What limits range of gravitational attraction concerning space expansion?

Wikipedia says: Metric expansion is a key feature of Big Bang cosmology and is modeled mathematically with the FLRW metric. This model is valid in the present era only on large scales (roughly ...
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1answer
115 views

Why are trajectories in General Relativity speed-dependant?

I'm a secondary student who never studied any general relativity level maths (yet!), but I heard that in general relativity objects with mass and energy deform space-time, and therefore bodies move in ...
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1answer
155 views

Do electrons have structure in quantum gravity?

I have read Luboš Motl's blog and he says in QG electrons must be composite and have structure because QG says there can be no point like particles and everything above the Planck size can be resolved ...
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2answers
595 views

Does influence on gravity increase with mass when velocities approach the speed of light? [duplicate]

In other words, when a particle's mass increases significantly as it approaches the speed of light (c), does its influence on gravity increase, and if so, does it increase proportionally?
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1answer
298 views

Trajectories of particles with spin in Einstein-Cartan theory

The Einstein-Cartan theory is a generalisation of General Relativity insofar as the condition that the metric affine connection is torsion-free is dropped. In other words, the space time is a ...
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1answer
99 views

Perihelion Advance in curve space

I've been doing some work that involves particle's motion subjected to central forces. I was trying to compute the perihelion advance of the particle's path. For that I've been following this ...
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6answers
3k views

Why won't protons revolve around the nucleus containing electrons and neutrons?

In case of solar system,we can explain "Why Sun would not revolve around any other planet?",by giving the reason that Sun is heavier than any other planets. Heavier the body,greater will be the ...
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1answer
105 views

Is projectile trajectory on Earth affected by the fact that it isn't a singular point?

So in high school physics, we were told that projectiles traveled in a parabola, but Google searches have said that it's more like an ellipse, since the Earth isn't flat. However, I was thinking that ...
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0answers
151 views

How could they be hit twice by debris?

In the movie Gravity the two astronauts (Bullock and Clooney) are hit twice by the fast moving debris that bring havoc to their locations. I think this is a bad scientific mistake in the movie plot. ...
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2answers
765 views

How Come gravity doesn't affect itself?

If gravity is this "unexplainable force" that pulls everything to the center of a planet or stellar remnant you stand upon, why doesn't gravity pull itself? If gravity affects anything with energy, ...
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3answers
417 views

What is gravity? [closed]

I am not asking why it occurs, but what it is. Everything understood is something. Something would entail the existence of a property, whether or not tangible. We know photons exist, but we know ...
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1answer
18k views

Do we have theories about why gravity exists/HOW it works?

For years I have been very fascinated by the "mystery" aspect of gravity. Functionally, we understand it perfectly for our all applications, but in my (limited to undergrad General Physics 3 quarters) ...
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1answer
238 views

Given finite speed of gravity, why didn't Earth fell into the Sun already?

When Sun and Earth are moving, at each moment $t$ they are attracted not to the current position of each other, but to the position of each other at $t-\Delta t$, where $\Delta t$ is the time required ...
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1answer
505 views

Why does mini quadcopter doesn't maintain altitude?

I have a mini quadcopter controlled by remote controller. I have set the motors (e.g 50% thrust) it will remain at altitude at 10 cm~ but once I increase to 80% and then follow by decrease to 50% I ...
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1answer
451 views

Sandstone getting soaked with water

I have seen someone putting a sandstone in water. With only about 10% of the stone sitting in the water. One could see the stone getting soaked with water. So there must be a force, which lets the ...
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8answers
864 views

Why in Newton's law of gravity, we do $M_1 \times M_2$ and not $M_1 + M_2$?

In Newton's law of gravity $$F=\frac{G M_1 \cdot M_2}{r^2}$$ we do the product $M_1 \times M_2$ and not the sum $M_1 + M_2$. Why's that so?
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1answer
137 views

How faster is the effect of force exerted by gravity? [duplicate]

We all know that Earth revolves around the Sun due to Gravitational force of the Sun. Also we know that it takes just over 8 minutes for the Sun's light to reach Earth. Now let us say, hypothetically ...
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1answer
787 views

The physics equation for a perpetual seesaw

I am trying to create a game that envovles two or more people jumping on a seesaw and propelling each other in the air. I need help with the physics equations Assume no friction no air resistance ...
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1answer
87 views

Trying to understand infinite gravitational energy

Google has not been helpful because so many derivations of gravitational potential energy discuss $r$ at infinity. My understanding of this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcxptIJS7kQ is: Dark ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the buoyant and viscous force acting on a ball in free fall?

I was thinking about a situation were I have a long cylindrical jar with some viscous liquid in it. I also have a spherical ball with me. I drop the ball into the liquid inside the jar with some ...
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1answer
188 views

How does Hawking radiation grow as a black hole evaporates?

The temperature of Hawking radiation is inversely proportional to the mass of a black hole, $T_{\rm H}\propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1}$, and so as the black hole shrinks the temperature of the radiation should ...
3
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1answer
299 views

How can you calculate the tidal gradient for an orbit?

In the movie Gravity, two characters are dangling from the international space station by a long tether. I've previously wondered exactly how you could calculate the tidal forces that act on an ...
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0answers
75 views

Present experimental status of Moffat's Modified theory of Gravity

Modified theories of Gravity have been discussed before in this 2-year old question, Are modified theories of gravity credible? I was going through Moffat's modified gravity, given in ...
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3answers
322 views

Why do sand dunes, hills and mountains assume the shape they normally do?

What about something taken in a tablespoon? This shape, as I understand, could be explained by gravity, friction and similar concepts, but why the shape isn't cubical or cylindrical couldn't be ...
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2answers
914 views

Horizontal Gravitational Force

So I was writing a lab report for Physics I, where I was describing projectile motion. I had written Since gravity on Earth does not have a horizontal force, the object will not lose horizontal ...
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3answers
3k views

Calculating Atmospheric Pressure on an Imaginary Planet

I am planning a series of science fiction novels that take place on an imaginary binary planet system. Both planets have a lower surface gravity than the Earth and one has slightly more mass than the ...
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2answers
112 views

How does one determine black hole mass based on the curvature of a photon?

How much mass would a black hole need to create a Schwarzschild radius that would trap a photon, whereby the photon would (to an outside observer) be continually curved 0.004km/s at the horizon? ...
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1answer
314 views

What is most infeasible about a sky hook (as in space travel not Batman)?

We need to get things into space but it costs too much. Lots of people talk about space elevators but no one talks about the skyhook idea. I'm referring to this: Skyhook (Wikipedia), not the thing in ...
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2answers
522 views

Can a scalar field model gravity? How accurate would be the results? Are there any difficulties with such a model?

Newtonian gravity can be described by the equation: $$ \nabla^2 \phi = 4 \pi \rho G $$ where $\rho$ is the mass density, $\phi$ is the gravitational potential, and G is the universal gravitational ...
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1answer
11k views

Are the perpetual machines in this video really perpetual?

This video lists a number of perpetual motion machines that have been proposed throughout history: Robert Boyle's Self-Flowing Flask A "perpetual train" using rolling cones F. G. Woodward's hoop ...
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0answers
301 views

Angular Momentum Conservation in Gravitational Interaction

thanks for any help. I'm trying to show that in a 2body problem, angular momentum is conserved given that $\dfrac{dp}{dt}=\dfrac{-GMm(rv)}{r³}$, where p is momentum, t time, G gravitational constant, ...
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1answer
890 views

Angular Momentum Conservation in Gravitational Interaction [duplicate]

thanks for any help. I'm trying to show that in a 2body problem, angular momentum is conserved given that $\dfrac{dp}{dt}=\dfrac{-GMm(rv)}{r³}$, where p is momentum, t time, G gravitational constant, ...
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1answer
88 views

Testing the speed of gravitational waves in superfluids

Ok. Light can be slowed down in superfluids. I would like to know whether if a Cavendish like experiment could be possible within inside superfluids i.e, to rotate two balls such that to observe their ...
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2answers
113 views

Is centre of gravity a point?

Is the centre of earth a point? If it is so, then it should attract objects both horizontally and vertically. But, it always attracts vertically. Why is it so?
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3answers
112 views

Neutrinos travels through our bodies: do they contribute for gravitational atractive force?

Are neutrinos traveling through our bodies what really make us attracted to the Earth?
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2answers
2k views

Why gravity is an attractive force? [duplicate]

Why gravity is an attractive force? One may say that it is because of space time curvature but General Relativity is built on this law: $\displaystyle G \frac{m_1 \times m_2}{r^2}$ (To be more ...
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2answers
758 views

Newtonian gravity equation in a 2 dimensional world [duplicate]

I am wondering if my line of thought is correct - and thus the resulting answer to the problem above would be correct. As we know the gravitational force (of two point masses) is given by $$F = ...
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1answer
150 views

General Relativity and Time Dilation [duplicate]

Is time affected by the gravitational force? If so, what might be the effect on time at the centre or near centre of earth ?
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270 views

Gravitation not instantaneous = non elliptic orbits?

When I studied physics some time ago my teacher explained that if we consider the gravitational atraction not instantaneous, such as the General Relativity says, the planets would be attracted towards ...