Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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Why does a star collapse under its own gravity when the gravity at its centre is zero?

The gravity at the centre of a star is zero as in the case of any uniform solid sphere with some mass. When a massive star dies, why does it give rise to a black hole at it's centre? I know how to ...
2
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3answers
82 views

Gravity and objects at 0K

Let's say I put 2 objects at rest relative to each other with 0 Kelvin. Will they move towards each other because of gravity? Where they will get energy to move? I don't have education in this field, ...
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1answer
82 views

Would not gravity negate entropy?

Back in high school, I asked my teacher gave us a quick explanation of relativity. Specifically, he told us what $E=mc^2$ meant. He explained that, at least as far as we needed to be concerned, matter ...
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75 views

Acceleration at two points on a rigid body

The rod AB is falling while sliding on the friction-less wall and the floor. I need to find the acceleration of the points A and B. I am sure that the point A is freely falling, so its acceleration ...
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3answers
359 views

How does water falling down a waterfall gain energy?

I'm kind of a noob in the physics area. But I know that energy cannot be created, it can only be transferred. So how and what "type" of energy does water get when free-falling?
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How long does an object experience motionlessness at the beginning of its descent?

When a rubber ball bounces, it first accelerates in the positive direction (downward) then it bounces (hits the floor) .The velocity then becomes negative as the ball declerates while travelling ...
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638 views

Non-Constant Acceleration due to Gravity

Recently, I had the first physics lab for my university physics course. This lab was fairly simple, as we were merely using a computer and a distance sensor to graph the position, velocity, and ...
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0answers
31 views

Calculating gravity with inclometer?

How would one calculate the gravity vector for [X,Y,Z] by using an inclinometer which gives Pitch, Yaw and Roll. A little explanation of the goal: I have a accelerometer I was planning to use to map ...
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1answer
127 views

Can gravity be reversed?

I'm wondering if any set of hypothetical conditions could result in us gravitating in a different direction. Specifically a reversal of gravity on the surface of Earth (or at least part of it), so ...
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54 views

Effect of spin on gravitational field?

If a large sphere of uniform density is spinning around one axis, is its gravitational field uniform? If yes, then what if it's not a sphere or not uniform? For example if we remove a chunk of the ...
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2answers
84 views

Breaking ocean waves on other planets possible?

I have always wondered if there were an ocean on another planet with stronger or weaker gravity, would it be possible to have breaking waves?
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1answer
100 views

Two small objects are placed at rest in an empty universe a great distance apart. Given an infinite amount of time will gravity cause them to meet? [closed]

Let's say the objects are marble size or even single atoms or quarks. They are placed in an otherwise empty universe(expanding or non-expanding) at opposite ends of the universe with an arbitrarily ...
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2answers
178 views

Has anyone checked whether the speed of light varies according to gravitation

My physics is fairly basic, but I hope someone can answer without being too rude. A transparent medium such as water or glass refracts light and also reduces its speed, so I was wondering whether ...
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1answer
67 views

Is it possible to affect the trajectory of a black hole?

Basically is the black hole itself affected by the matter going into it? Does it either get pulled by gravity toward things or have its own velocity affected by matter that "impacts" it?
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1answer
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Could each non-dependent physical contant represent dimentions, and our universe be a point on this n-dimentional structure?

For example say the gravitation constant instead of equaling G, was actually a range bounded between 0 and infinity. Our Universe would be at a point on this range (equal to our G value) where ...
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1answer
87 views

How long would it take for a galaxy to collapse without dark matter?

I am trying to understand the effects of gravity in the Cosmos without complications of Dark Matter/Dark energy issues. So my question is, assuming that a galaxy (for example, the Milky Way) does not ...
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2answers
59 views

Effect of sun turning into a black hole on earth [duplicate]

Suppose the sun would turn into a black hole. Now neglecting the effect on the living beings on the earth. would the sun suck up the earth or the earth's revolution would not be affected?
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1answer
74 views

Does rotation cause gravity?

I want to ask that what causes gravity. My opinion is that it is the rotation that causes gravity, when we see a whirlpool in water it takes anything that comes near to it in to the center of it. I ...
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3answers
106 views

Law of attraction

Could you please explain that since we know Newton's law of Universal Gravitation says all masses attract each other. Thus, we humans should be attracted as well or any other daily life objects. Why ...
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2answers
181 views

Gravitational collapse and free fall time (spherical, pressure-free)

A very large number of small particles forms a spherical cloud. Initially they are at rest, have uniform mass density per unit volume $\rho_0$, and occupy a region of radius $r_0$. The cloud collapses ...
3
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1answer
97 views

Perpetual motion in spaces of different gravity?

Imagine two locations with different amounts of gravity. I carry up a weight in low gravity, move it on this height over to the other place, and let it fall down there with higher gravity. Wouldn't ...
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2answers
102 views

Gravitational field has no curl? What about gas discs around stars, black holes, etc.?

So everybody says the gravitational field has no curl, and is not comparable to a liquid swirling around a drain. Observationally, of course, there are many examples of vector fields (which I think ...
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5answers
293 views

Can we escape earth's gravity slowly?

I had a recent conversation with my girlfriend, who is a physics grad student. She was kind enough to listen to me rant about an idea concerning escape velocity. Unfortunately, I am still thinking ...
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3answers
272 views

Does Super Mario physics work in reality? [duplicate]

This illustration summarizes my question: Please assume no air resistance (unless that makes a large difference). Here's what we concluded, but I could use both confirmation and also help with the ...
108
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15answers
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How do I explain to a 6 year old why people on the other side of the Earth don't fall off? [closed]

Today a friend's 6 year old sister asked me the question "why don't people on the other side of the earth fall off?". I tried to explain that the Earth is a huge sphere and there's a special force ...
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3answers
151 views

how apparent weight varies due to the rotational motion of earth

I learned that as the earth rotates about its axis, the bodies on the earth also follow a circular path. In most books I read, they give the example of a person standing on a weight balance at the ...
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117 views

Do photons feel gravity of approaching objects only?

I have read that photons while travelling near massive objects such as the sun experience gravitational pull which is why we see some stars at different positions than they are when seen towards the ...
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0answers
98 views

Repulsive forces at large distances

I'm currently writing a 3D $n$-body simulator (similar to what you see here to simulate the evolution of a system of n particles under the force of gravity. It works fine for "smaller" scale ...
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1answer
66 views

Dropping an object from a plane [closed]

I've done this before, but it's been a long time. Using trigonometric functions, I've been asked to solve the following problem. However, I'm at a complete loss as to how to do it. I have 5 questions ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Blimp challenge. Doubts about volume at different heights [closed]

I want to design and build a small semi-rigid airship/dirigible. It will be controlled with RC so I will install motors, arduino, battery etc. Filled with helium. Weight of the equipment is about 2kg ...
7
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2answers
145 views

Why does dark matter form walls and filaments

Related: How are galaxy filaments formed? And do they have any analogues in stellar formation? But I want to come at this from a different angle. Like the user asking that other question, I was a bit ...
15
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1answer
326 views

Why the galaxies forms 2D plane (or spiral-like) instead of 3D ball (or spherical-like)?

Question: As we know (1) the macroscopic spatial dimension of our universe is 3 dimension, and (2) Gravity attracts massive objects together and the gravitational force is isotropic without ...
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2answers
104 views

Time Delays in General Relativity

If gravity propagates at, or less than, the speed of light, and is therefore not instantaneous, does that introduce time delays to gravity? For example: suppose that we, the observer, sit within the ...
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0answers
56 views

Squashed 3-sphere?

What is a squashed 3-sphere? In context of quantum gravity. I stumbled upon a term 'squashed 7 sphere' but that's concerning supersymmetry. Is it just normal 3-sphere metric, that is just 'squashed' ...
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2answers
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Why can't I calculate center of mass via torque? Results off by a few percent

Why do I keep getting a slightly different result from the following two ways of determining the center of mass of a rigid, geometrically simple object? The object is a rectangular 5(x) by 7(y) ...
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2answers
80 views

The physical interpretation of Newton's constant $G$

It is well known that the speed of light $c$ can be interpreted as the speed limit for information propagation. Similarly, the Planck's constant $h$ is interpreted as the minimum quantum package of ...
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0answers
49 views

What is the 1/2 spin analog of the graviton called?

In some supergravities you have the gravition, gravitino, graviphoton and graviscalar. Each is analogous to each other in only sharing gravitational properties and nothing else. They differ by spin ...
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0answers
152 views

Gravity change as a function of time only

Is it possible to find how gravity changes with time? That is, height is not part of the equation. For example, $g$ can be expressed as a function of height that does not involve time with this ...
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4answers
139 views

Solids: is energy expended in some fashion by, say, a table to keep the top from sinking down against gravity?

A friend and I were discussing this, and couldn't decide. Since it takes energy to physically raise something up above the planet's surface, does it continue to require energy in order to keep it ...
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3answers
507 views

No uncertainty for standard gravitational acceleration?

The other day I asked about the uncertainty of light, and this issue triggered me to start looking into other physical constants and try to understand why other constants have no uncertainty. One of ...
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1answer
95 views

Has anyone tried to do Galileo's tower of Pisa experiment at a molecular or atomic scale

Galileo is reputed to have demonstrated that unequal masses fall at an equal rate by dropping them off the tower of Pisa and observing that they hit the ground simultaneously. Has anyone tried to push ...
0
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1answer
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What shape would an explosion be in orbit?

In the Gravity movie discussions we learn that objects accellerated towards an object in the same orbit miss it and move to a higher orbit. Objects accellerated away from an object in the same orbit ...
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0answers
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Gravity from energy [duplicate]

Both energy and mass gives has gravity. If an object receives energy, it will appear heavier and space will curve slightly more around that object. That energy could be potential energy, or static ...
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0answers
29 views

What are the technical differences between the various equivalence principles?

I understand the differences between the various equivalence principles at the level of words, but I'm not sure how they follow from various equations. If I'm given a theory of gravity with metric ...
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3answers
171 views

What makes matter travel along geodesics?

The relativistic explanation of gravity is geometric, the motion of a body in a field of space-time distortion can be described as being at rest and travelling along a geodesic of that field, but why ...
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1answer
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Question about gravity in 1 dimension

Consider 2 pointmasses in 1D space. More specific ; object $A$ with mass $m_a$ and object $B$ with mass $m_b$. $A$ and $B$ are a distance $d$ away from eachother. Let these pointmasses $A,B$ have no ...
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0answers
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How to show that tensor gravity is nonrenormalizable?

Let's have the tensor gravity theory, which represented the massless spin-2 field: $$ L = -\frac{1}{32 \pi G}\left( \frac{1}{2}(\partial_{\alpha}h_{\nu \beta}) \partial^{\alpha}\bar {h}^{\nu \beta} - ...
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7answers
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How can space and time arise from nothing?

Lawrence Krauss said this on an Australian Q&A programme. "...when you apply quantum mechanics to gravity, space itself can arise from nothing as can time..." Can you elaborate on this please? ...
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How to get “massless” equation of motion from the action of Nordstrom scalar field theory?

There is Nordstrom theory of the particle moving in a scalar field $\varphi (x)$: $$ S = -m\int e^{\varphi (x)}\sqrt{\eta_{\alpha \beta}\frac{dx^{\alpha}}{d \lambda}\frac{dx^{\beta}}{d ...
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Derivation of equations of motion in Nordstrom's theory of scalar gravity?

Nordstrom's theory of a particle moving in the presence of a scalar field $\varphi (x)$ is given by $$ S = -m\int e^{\varphi (x)}\sqrt{\eta_{\alpha \beta}\frac{dx^{\alpha}}{d ...