Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
0answers
68 views

When spacetime expands to the point where galaxy clusters are not observable, will there by any interaction?

It's my understanding that in a few billion years, clusters of galaxies won't be able to directly observe one another due to the expansion of spacetime overcoming gravity between those clusters. ...
4
votes
2answers
120 views

Orbit in the vacuum

As the space is a vacuum and there is no friction in space, Can we assume that, if we place an object in gravity in exactly the right distance from a planet with gravity and in the right acceleration, ...
3
votes
2answers
265 views

Regarding the free electrons on the conductor

In a metal, why don’t the free electrons fall to the bottom of the metal due to gravity? Also, charges in a conductor are supposed to reside on the surface so why don’t the free electrons all go to ...
8
votes
1answer
861 views

Why is Einstein gravity not renormalizable at two loops or more?

(I found this related Phys.SE post: Why is GR renormalizable to one loop?) I want to know explicitly how it comes that Einstein-Hilbert action in 3+1 dimensions is not renormalizable at two loops or ...
2
votes
3answers
293 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
1
vote
2answers
166 views

Can acceleration feel like constant gravity for indefinitely long?

So here's the setup: I'm in a spaceship, without windows as always, and the ship is accelerating upwards at a constant rate of $1\,\text{g}$. So inside the spaceship it feels like I'm being pulled ...
5
votes
2answers
836 views

What is the largest sphere of liquid water that could exist in space held together under it's own gravity? [duplicate]

What is the largest theoretical sphere of liquid water that could exist in space held together under it's own gravity? I've always wondered if a planet the size of earth could exist as a single volume ...
3
votes
1answer
126 views

Transformation law for fermionic measure in functional integral

I am reading the paper "Bosonization in a Two-Dimensional Riemann-Cartan Geometry", Il Nuovo Cimento B Series 11 11 Marzo 1987, Volume 98, Issue 1, pp 25-36, ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Does gravity affects temperature reading of a mercury thermometer?

I remember when I was in primary school, the science teacher put me in charge of a mercury thermometer. I do not quite understand the mechanics behind except that mercury expands when it is hot and ...
0
votes
3answers
396 views

Parachute in vacuum

Consider that the earth is vacuum. Consider a person of weight 100 kg is falling from sky with an parachute . He is free falling at height of 3000 m. When will he reach the ground? What would happen ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

Solar Catastrophe [duplicate]

Consider all of sudden the sun vanishes. What would happen to planetary motion. Will it continue to move in elliptical path or move in a tangential to the orbit immediately after sun vanishes or move ...
6
votes
1answer
245 views

Why is $R^2$ gravity not unitary?

I have often heard that $R^2$ gravity (as studied by Stelle) is renormalisable but not unitary. My question is: what is it that causes the theory to suffer from problems with unitarity? My naive ...
0
votes
2answers
311 views

Einstein's theory tells us that gravity is a curve in space and time but how does that causes attraction in mass? [duplicate]

The sun is incredibly massive object and it causes the space around it to bend. This causes the planets to pulled to the sun or the planets move in an elliptical path around the sun. But I don't ...
1
vote
3answers
237 views

About gravity through space time curvature

Is it possible to produce virtual gravity? I mean gravity without the help of mass by curving spacetime with other effects like fast rotating objects?
2
votes
1answer
111 views

Can a rotating-ring space-station design be applied to a rotating sphere?

Suppose engineers built a rotating space station similar to Space Station V from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey (circa 1968), but with a large sphere, instead of a ring? Could this be rotated or ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

gravity affecting a molecules speed? [closed]

Why are the poles colder than the rest ofthe planet?Is the gravity stronger making molecules spin slower?How does gravity affect heat and hydrogen bonds? And what affects gravity?A little off topic ...
0
votes
2answers
521 views

Gravity pull on objects accelerating towards the earth's center?

Accelerating away from a mass mitigates gravity's pull on the accelerating object. Would the same be true for an object accelerating towards the center of the mass?
7
votes
2answers
489 views

Why water in the sink follow a curved path?

When you fill the sink with water and then allow the water to be drained, the water forms a vortex.. And then it starts to follow a curved path downwards by effects of gravity.. Why this phenomena ...
3
votes
2answers
161 views

Could a planet sized bubble of breatheable atmostphere exist?

I'm reading a book (Sun of Suns by Karl Schroeder) that the main location is a planet called Virga, which contains air, water, and floating chunks of rock, and has no or a very small amount of ...
4
votes
3answers
218 views

Finite or ∞ set of masses & ∃ gravity center?

Any finite & non empty set of masses has a computable center of gravity: $\vec{OG} = \frac{\sum_i m_i \vec{OM}_i}{\sum_i m_i}$ . Does the contrapositive permits to conclude that a mass system ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Gravity mitigated by velocity regardless of mass?

We know that a small object moving fast enough can pass by a planet and escape its gravity. Would this be (theoretically) true in reverse? Meaning a planet moving fast enough past a stationary smaller ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Does everything with mass or energy have a gravitational pull?

As small as it may be, does every 'thing' have a gravitational pull? That is, something with mass or energy. No matter how obsolete or negligible it may be, is it there? If so, how is it calculated? ...
2
votes
1answer
386 views

Simulations of Planetary Motions

I wrote a spreadsheet that simulates the trajectory of 3 planets in 2D space. The method is simple: for each moment in space, calculate the force felt and velocity of each planet, then for the next ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Is a purely vertical or almost vertical orbital launch possible?

Is it possible, for the sake of argument, to launch a payload into an orbit around the earth by putting almost all the energy going at a 90 degree angle? What velocity would it take, and what ...
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

Gravitational potential energy

Consider two places next to each other: Place 1, where there is a gravitational field whereas Place 2 - there's no field. Now if we lifted a box in place 1, it gains potential energy. Then, we move ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

Would an object float if it were placed in the center of a rotating space station?

Suppose engineers built a large circular room in a rotating space station where if one looked directly up from any location, one could see the floor. If one used a ladder to reach the center of the ...
1
vote
4answers
4k views

Why do objects accelerate as they fall?

Most importantly, what must change in order for the falling object to change its speed? Is it the distance to the centre of the planet? If you pull the earth away from the object as the object falls, ...
1
vote
1answer
341 views

Photon on null geodesic

If given an FRW metric $ds^2 = -dt^2 + a^2(t)[dx^2+dy^2+dz^2]$ and for the trajectory followed by a photon (null geodesic; $ds^2=0$) with affine parameter $\lambda$, know that ...
0
votes
2answers
681 views

About the work done by gravity to pull the object down to the earth surface

The following question is from an physics exercise and I know the answer and the way to solve the problem but just curious why my own way doesn't work. The question is asking "A 2500kg space vehicle, ...
2
votes
2answers
213 views

Understanding bending light beam perpendicular to motion

I'm just reading a book about gravity. An example it gives is a spaceship accelerating. A beam of light travelling at right angles to the direction of movement of the spaceship enters it via a small ...
4
votes
1answer
318 views

Can a hovering helicopter travel half the globe in 12 hours? [duplicate]

Suppose we have a helicopter that is able to stay stationary in flight for extended periods of time. If such a helicopter stayed at point A in the sky for 12 hours straight, would it reach the other ...
1
vote
2answers
197 views

So gravity turns things round

It makes sense, since gravity tends to push the surface of a body towards it's center. Unless I'm mistaken, everything with mass has it's own gravity, every atom and for instance, our own bodies ...
-1
votes
2answers
280 views

General Relativity & Kepler's law [duplicate]

According to Kepler's law of planetary motion, the earth revolves around the sun in an elliptical path with sun at one of its focus. However, according to general theory of relativity, the earth ...
1
vote
2answers
923 views

Electric vs. Gravitational shielding [duplicate]

There are great similarities between electric and gravitational fields and, furthermore, a room can be electrically shielded so that there are no electric fields simply by surrounding it with a ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Force inversely proportional to the squared distance

Newton's law of universal gravitation: "Newton's law of universal gravitation states that every point mass in the universe attracts every other point mass with a force that is directly proportional to ...
2
votes
5answers
6k views

Einstein gravity versus Newton's gravity

What's the basic difference between the gravity as seen by Einstein, and that by Newton?
0
votes
2answers
192 views

What mechanisms exist for generating lift on a static object?

What mechanisms exist for generating lift on a static object? Condition is: Other than propellers I know that generating lift on a static object in a sense of anti-gravity for e.g. drone is not ...
1
vote
1answer
157 views

What will be the shape of liquid if there is no gravitational force [duplicate]

We all know that liquid will take a shape of container in which its filled, but What will be the shape of liquid if there is no gravitational force?
0
votes
2answers
505 views

Generating artificial gravity by using rotation

If I want to design for futuristic space stations and I want to use rotation to produce artificial gravity. One of such designs consists of a giant ring that is rotated about its centre. If it were ...
9
votes
1answer
534 views

Gravitationally bound systems in an expanding universe

This isn't yet a complete question; rather, I'm looking for a qual-level question and answer describing a gravitationally bound system in an expanding universe. Since it's qual level, this needs a ...
25
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is gravity such a unique force?

My knowledge on this particular field of physics is very sketchy, but I frequently hear of a theoretical "graviton", the quantum of the gravitational field. So I guess most physicists' assumption is ...
4
votes
2answers
702 views

Place each foot on a scale: can you add the two to find your weight?

I frequent a blog from a British psychologist, and every Friday he likes to pose an interesting puzzle or riddle. The Monday after that he posts the answer. They're good fun, and IANAP but this week's ...
3
votes
1answer
120 views

How can photons exert gravity if they are wave-like?

As a reference, see this question: Does a photon exert a gravitational pull? It turns out the answer is "Yes" -- but this does not seem consistent with light being wave-like. I am imagining a ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?
3
votes
1answer
146 views

Are laws of gravity time symmetric?

Time symmetry is often explained by the example of orbiting objects... What I can't find an explanation for is the moment when an object enters into orbit around another object. That clearly breaks ...
3
votes
1answer
377 views

Calculating Riemann Tensor Using Tetrad Formalism

I was trying to calculate the Riemann Tensor for a spherically symmetric metric: $ds^2=e^{2a(r)}dt^2-[e^{2b(r)}dr^2+r^2d\Omega^2]$ I chose the to use the tetrad basis: $u^t=e^{a(r)}dt;\, ...
2
votes
4answers
146 views

Constructing an orbital trajectory that quickly returns to its origin

I'm working on a science fiction story that involves two spaceships engaged in combat while in orbit around a planetoid. My original idea called for spaceship A to trick spaceship B into firing a ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Reconciling Units in Jeans' Criterion Formula

In "Physics and Chemistry of the Solar System" Jeans' Criterion is given as: $\frac{GmM}{R_c} = \frac{3mkT}{2}$ ... To me this suggests that on the left we have Joules, and on the right we have ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

Why do bullets in a magazine go up instead of down? [closed]

I've been curious about this, and it might not belong here, but I'll ask anyways. For most modern weaponry that I've seen or used, it appears that the magazine is always placed below the barrel of ...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

Water Stream from a Horizontal Surface

If water was projected from a flat surface where gravity was equal all over the surface. What would happen when the water fell in on itself? The water is in a continuous stream and is perfectly ...