Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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How did Einstein derive general relativity?

How did Einstein derive general relativity (GR)? Did he use: the equivalence principle? The principle of least action? Anything else? Note, I'm not looking for a full mathematical derivation of GR! ...
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Is it possible/correct to describe electromagnetism using curved space(-time)? [duplicate]

Comparing the simples form of the forces of both phenomena: the law of Newton for gravitation $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, and the Coulomb law for electrostatics $V\propto \frac{1}{r}$, one might think ...
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Transfer of energy from gravity back to other “more familiar” forms of energy?

In this question I've mentioned an account of the recently reported 2nd observation of gravitational waves, LIGO and Virgo Collaborations, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241103, 15 June 2016, where 1 of the ...
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When a ball is tossed straight up, does it experience momentary equilibrium at top of its path?

This question has been asked many times all over the Internet and answers can be found on places such as yahoo and ask.com, but I'm not satisfied with those answers and I don't trust the validity of ...
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Can a huge gravitational force cause visible distortions on an object

In space, would it be possible to have an object generating such a huge gravitational force so it would be possible for an observer (not affected directly by gravitational force and the space time ...
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Gravitation as the source of redshift of light beams

According to Hubble's law, light and other kinds of electromagnetic radiation emitted from distant objects are redshifted. The more distant the source, the more intense is the redshift. Now, the ...
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Gravitational Time Dilation with big masses

From Wikipedia I read that the formula for calculating the time dilation caused by a mass is $t_0 = t_f{\sqrt{1-\frac{2GM}{rc^2}}}$ where: $t_0$ is the proper time between events A and B for a slow-...
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Silly bet about the best way to walk up a hill

I have a silly bet with a friend of mine. One of us argues that walking up a hill whilst leaning forward requires less exertion, due to your centre of mass being further forward, and therefore ...
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Two masses in deep space - collide or orbit?

If two identical masses are somehow "released" into deep space (that is, they're subject to no other gravitation forces but their own, and are initially at rest to each other). What decides whether ...
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Can a planet cover the whole sky as seen from its satellite

Sorry if this is a trivial question, but I do not know enough physics to answer this on my own. Can there exist a satellite that revolves around a planet so large such that the planet covers the ...
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Why Can a Skydiver Hit the Ground and Be Killed? [duplicate]

This is a follow on question from Physics SE Question "Can a Skydiver Land On a Large Slide and Survive?". User Steeven gives this answer here. User Dargscisyhp asks: What is it exactly that ...
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What's the biggest cube you could have before gravity rounded it?

I took this question from Quora because it seems interesting and this community would have some fun with it. I would assume that one would use the modulus formulas for force to counteract the gravity, ...
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Orbit reversal in a gravitational well

A friend recently asked me this, and without wishing to spend a huge time thinking about it, I wondered if anyone knew the answer (or at least had an informed guess), or was familiar enough with these ...
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With gravitational lensing could we see our selves from a right angle?

When looking at a black hole the ability to see ourselves is compromised by the small window for the light trajectory to come back to us. The light from the Earth that is bent by (almost) 180° and ...
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Does the escape velocity of a black hole exceed $c$ *before* a singularity is created?

As an offshoot of the question Can we have a black hole without a singularity? I'm curious if the point of no return at which the massive object is condemned to become a singularity happens before its ...
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How quickly does gravity extend from created mass? [duplicate]

I apologize in advance if this is a stupid or off-topic question. Since Energy can be converted into matter according to $E=mc^2$, how fast does it take for the gravity of that new matter to extend ...
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Where does the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime really come from?

I have been searching for quite a while but mostly found the answer: Einstein's genius. Quite unsatisfactory. I know and understand that the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime works. Furthermore I ...
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What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
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Does the equivalence principle mean that the Earth is expanding?

Popular books suggest that for an observer in the Einstein lift the following situations are equivalent: 1, the lift hangs motionless (relative to the Earth) on a cable in the gravitational field of ...
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What would happen if I take a glass of water in space?

What would happen if I take a glass of water in space i.e. outside the gravitational influence of earth? My teacher said that the water would vaporize but I am not completely satisfied by the answer. ...
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Where does air pressure come from?

Where does air pressure come from? I thought it was from gravity or the speed of the gas resulting from its heat. However, analyzing my own hypotheses, I think that my 'heat conjecture' is probably ...
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What is the intuition behind $gt^2/2$ equalling the distance something falls after $t$ seconds?

Let's say $g=10\ \text{m/s}^2$ and it drops for $3$ seconds. For the first second it will drop $10\ \text{m}$, the second it will drop $20\ \text{m}$ ($10 + 10$) and the third second it will drop $30\ ...
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Zero divergence of energy-momentum tensor and gravitational energy

Trying to teach myself general relativity and have just hit yet another confusion. I'm reading that in curved spacetime the energy-momentum tensor has zero divergence, ie $$\nabla_{\mu}T^{\mu\nu}=0.$$...
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Why is gravity weak at the quantum level?

Why is gravity stronger than other forces at the macroscopic level, yet weaker than other forces at the quantum level? Is there an explanation?
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Astronaut on a rotating asteroid

This might sound like the silliest question ever, but can someone shed some light on what is actually happening in the following situation: There is an asteroid in outer space what is rotating with ...
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General Relativity Paradox: Holding a string across a gravitational gradient

The paradox I envision involves two objects that exist in very different gravitational potentials -- one very high (eg: close to a black hole) and one very low (eg: far away from a black hole). Now, ...
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Is the popular explanation given for gravity in General Relativity misleading? [duplicate]

In most popular explanations of General Relativity, both in print and film/television, gravity is demonstrated using an example of a 2 dimensional plane being flat, then when putting a heavy object in ...
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How do gravitational waves work without internal tension?

One implication of general relativity is the concept of gravitational waves or gravitational radiation, ripples in spacetime thought to travel at speeds close to the speed of light. As far as I have ...
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Can anyone explain me how time can bend according to Einstein in simple way? [duplicate]

I am just 16 and curious to learn about Theory of Relativity. Can any one explain it simple enough for me to understand? I read that it is bending of time-space or space-time that causes gravity. How ...
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How is it we have helium on earth?

Earth gravity isn't strong enougth to hold helium so we are loosing it constantly. If earth assembled out of space dust how come we have helium? Where did it come from?
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How can the Schwarzschild radius of the universe be 13.7 billion light years?

So i was reading about Schwarzschild radius on Wiki and I found a interesting thing written there link. It says that the S. radius of the universe is as big as the size of the universe? How is ...
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Regarding the free electrons on the conductor

In a metal, why don’t the free electrons fall to the bottom of the metal due to gravity? Also, charges in a conductor are supposed to reside on the surface so why don’t the free electrons all go to ...
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How could they tell things weigh a sixth of their “Earth weight” on the moon?

I frequently keep hearing stuff about "gravity on the moon is only a sixth of that as Earth's" and "of course you'll weigh more on Jupiter". I do know the relative sizes of those bodies allow for ...
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Why do clusters of stars eventually dissipate?

Why don't the stars in a star cluster attract each other gravitationally, forming one big star? What causes a cluster to disperse the stars in it?
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What would be the optimal weight of a ball if I want to throw it as far as possibile?

Assume the force behind my throw to be X. Assume the point of release is 2 meters above ground. Asume the ball is made of shiny steel. I'm not sure if the material matters, I'm just thinking that ...
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Voyager local time dilation (caused by gravity)

Voyager I, as an example, taking account gravity and setting aside effects of speed as cause of time dilation. If it is very far away from earth and sun, so then there must be a difference in the ...
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Gravothermal catastrophe: looking for simple explanation

I am beginning to try to understand the gravothermal catastrophe. I was hoping someone could provide an explanation to help me understand what the gravothermal catastrophe is and why it is important, ...
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gravitational force and irreversibility

If we place a ball at a certain height it falls and the process is irreversible. Is there any entropy change associated with the falling of ball? If so why?
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If gravity dropped off with the cube of distance

If gravity, for instance, dropped off with the cube instead of the square of distance from the Sun, would the planets still follow elliptical paths?
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Shouldn't dark matter distort light and therefore be directly detectable?

It is an established fact that gravity bends space time and therefore distorts light. We know that Dark matter acts gravitationally. So, just for giggles, lets say I had a sphere of dark matter ...
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How does gravity increase (or, at least, not-decrease) entropy?

I'm a total physics n00b (i.e. I only know the physics as taught in IT grades, and don't remember much of it), and was talking about entropy (initially, not with the physical implications). My friend ...
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What is conformal gauge?

I often see in physics articles on gravity such notion as conformal gauge and Weyl transformation. They use Conformal gauge to change coordinates to transform metrics from arbitrary $$ds^2=g_{\mu \...
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Frame dragging — is there a “non-tiny” example?

Now. As I understand it, in fact, the earth (10^25 kg) creates a very small, very tiny, frame dragging effect. Indeed, we have measured this using satellite experiments. So, the Earth (10^25 kg) ...
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If dark energy is accelerating the expansion of the universe, why can't I feel it?

Based on the Lambda-CDM cosmological model, our universe is not only expanding, but is accelerating in its expansion. However, the Equivalence Principle would suggest that inertia manifests itself in ...
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What's wrong with my calculation of gravitational potential for a uniform sphere?

This is really embarrassing, but I'm not quite sure where I'm going wrong here... Why is this calculation of the gravitational potential inside a sphere with uniform mass distribution incorrect? Set-...
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Why meet at the center of mass?

If two objects of different masses are held at a distance $d$ and then I let them go, they will meet at the center of mass of the particle system due to mutual gravitational attraction My question (...
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Why isn't all of the dust in a nebula used in the formation of a star?

I was watching a show on discovery and according to it, in a nebula the dust and gases slowly come together and as the gravity increases and the pressure rises in the core the gases fuse together and ...
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What kind of energy gravitates, and why?

When listing energies for the purposes of keeping track of conservation, or when writing down a Laplacian for a given system, we blithely intermix mass-energy, kinetic energy and potential energy; ...
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Can Vesta dominate the orbits of other asteroids?

I think I remember a talk where a professor said that Vesta is a particularly important asteroid because its gravity is strong enough to perturb other asteroids. In spite of Vesta's size, this effect ...
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Wavelength of photon changes as it rises from a planet's surface(acc. to this equation)?

The setup assumes a large mass(Earth?) an a photon launched from its surface initially. The wavelength of the photon on launch is known. Then the new energy of the photon is compared with energy it ...