Gravity is an attractive force that affects and is effected by all mass and - in general relativity - energy, pressure and stress. Prefer newtonian-gravity or general-relativity if sensible.

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Did force of gravity cause evolution of large scale structures?

Did big bang create gravity? What role gravity is assumed to have played in the formation (starting from the big bang) of large structures of our universe and what other important physical mechanisms ...
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CERN projects on gravity

Recently I was reading about CERN's upgrade to work on gravitational theories. But if most of the work has been done by General Theory of Relativity than with other theories are there that need to be ...
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207 views

Does a magnetic field have gravity?

Re-reading http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/33156/5265; I find myself thinking if light, being EM in the humanly visible spectrum, may possess gravity - does a magnetic field also possess gravity?
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761 views

Why does the force of gravity get weaker as it travels through the dimensions?

Some theories predict that the graviton exists in a dimension that we of course can't see, and that is why the force of gravity is so weak. Because by the time gravity has got from the dimension in ...
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818 views

Do all planets rotate around the sun with the same acceleration?

I have this question in mind. suppose if by any chance, all planet around sun stopped rotating. then as per formula F= M * A. all planet should fall with same acceleration towards sun and ultimately ...
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Three-Dimensional Gravity

Does anyone have any references that discuss gravity in three-dimensions? I'm trying to make my way through some papers by Witten relating $SL(2,\mathbb{C})$ Chern-Simons theory and gravity in three ...
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477 views

What is the mathematical nature of space time quantization in string theory/super string theory?

I don't know much about string theory, apart from it being a theory of everything which brings QM, QED and nuclear forces and gravity under one single roof. I am curious to know from a mathematical ...
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What is the effect of temperature on electrostatic-gravitational balance?

We have two identical massive metal spheres at the same temperature at rest in free space. Both have an identical charge and the Coulomb force [plus the black-body radiation pressure if the ...
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Velocity of satellites greater than required velocity

We often find velocity required to keep a satellite in orbit by the formula $v=\sqrt{\frac{GM}{r}}$ where $v$ is perpendicular to the gravitational force. It is very intuitive that the object will go ...
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67 views

Could the Earth be ejected when the sun burns out?

My younger brother came home from school today and told us at the dinner table that when the sun burns out the Earth could be ejected from its orbit. Skeptical, I asked his source. He quoted his ...
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Where does the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime really come from?

I have been searching for quite a while but mostly found the answer: Einstein's genius. Quite unsatisfactory. I know and understand that the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime works. Furthermore I ...
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Gravity and objects at 0K

Let's say I put 2 objects at rest relative to each other with 0 Kelvin. Will they move towards each other because of gravity? Where they will get energy to move? I don't have education in this field, ...
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Do photons feel gravity of approaching objects only?

I have read that photons while travelling near massive objects such as the sun experience gravitational pull which is why we see some stars at different positions than they are when seen towards the ...
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92 views

Gravitational Stark Effect

Could gravity induce line splittings in the optical spectrum of a molecule similar to the Stark or Zeeman Effects? Naively, a gravitational potential would be a simple addition to the Hamiltonian ...
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Does the total mass of an isolated object include the mass stored in its gravitational field?

Since neither the object nor its field could exist without the other, it would seem strange not to include the field energy as part of the object. But how exactly does the accounting go? How is the ...
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How does this shell hit the aircraft?

A fighter aircraft is flying horizontally at an altitude of 1500m with speed of 200m/s. The aircraft passes directly overhead an anti-aircraft gun. The muzzle speed of the gun is 600m/s. ...
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Is the Higgs field really disconnected from gravity?

I would like to understand better the role of Higgs mass in the gravitational interaction. I read here in some posts, that the Higgs mass has nothing to do with gravitation. Is it justified to say ...
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186 views

Barbells and gravity

A giant set of bar bells floating in space (like two identical sized planets connected by a long rod) would have a centre of mass midway between the two on the connecting rod. But surely it would ...
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Saturn's polar versus equatorial gravity

Wikipedia's reference for Saturn's gravity gives $10.44 m/s^2$ at the equator, but this conflicts with Britannica, which gives $8.96 m/s^2$ at the equator and $12.14 m/s^2$ at the poles. All values ...
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Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
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111 views

Can a rotating-ring space-station design be applied to a rotating sphere?

Suppose engineers built a rotating space station similar to Space Station V from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey (circa 1968), but with a large sphere, instead of a ring? Could this be rotated or ...
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Is it part of special relativity that mass possessing energy is more dense?

I was reading http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/hillis/hillis_p2.html and it says that a charged battery weighs more than a dead one or a rotating object weighs more than a stationary one (i.e. mass ...
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Is time speeding up due to the expansion of space?

If we just look at our local galactic cluster, if all of the galaxies that are a part of it are moving away from each other, and so the overall 'density' of the strength of gravity in the cluster is ...
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Gravitation force- Attraction and repulsion

Gravitation force is always attractive. Now assume(not a practical one): I took our Earth in my hand and started shaking up and down. This will create a disturbance in space-time warp and it moves ...
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Is the Schwarzschild black hole unphysical?

To obtain the Schwarzschild metric from Einstein equations of general relativity, we suppose that the energy density is a distribution : $$ \rho (\vec{r}) = M \delta(\vec{r})$$ The Schwarzschild ...
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Is the gravitational constant G a minimum value in some sense?

Assume a central body of mass $M$, and call $a$ the acceleration of a test body at a distance $r$ due to any interaction whatsoever with the central body. Is is correct to say that the ratio $a r^2/ ...
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LIGO Gravitational Waves [closed]

Has LIGO detected any gravity waves yet, or any hints of them? Is it just that LIGO is not sensitive enough or are we now entering disconfirmation territory? If we never detect gravity waves with any ...
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Who has succeeded in demonstrating the Lense-Thirring effect?

Who has succeeded in demonstrating the Lense-Thirring effect? This effect is one that describes the rotational motion of the Earth from a space-time structure. This effect is the "drag" of the ...
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What does velocity dispersion (sigma) reveal about a galaxy?

I'm getting hung up on this term. In studying SMBHs, I see that velocity dispersion strongly correlates with mass. Just what is the velocity dispersion? How can the velocity dispersion of the galaxy ...
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422 views

Why doesn’t gravity break down in a large black hole?

By popular theory gravity didn’t exist at the start of the Big Bang, but came into existence some moments later. I think the other forces came into existence a little latter. When a black hole ...
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47 views

Does velocity determine a geodesic?

If the gravity effect we witness is due to objects travelling along geodesics, why is the geodesic different for objects with different velocities if there is no gravitational force as such? For ...
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Does the distance two weights are from you alter the difficulty of lifting them?

If I am weightlifting and I choose to do the deadlift, does it matter how far away from me the weights are on the bar, given that they are equally distance from me on both sides. E.g. I am deadlifting ...
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Gravity doesn't seem to work the way it is supposed to [duplicate]

This has been a bit of an awkward question that's been plaguing me ever since I started watching space documentaries on discovery about 10 years ago. I was saving this for the day I would ever meet ...
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79 views

Is “scalar electromagnetics” real science?

This page claims that original Maxwell's equations, when formulated by Maxwell himself in quaternion form, had some special scalar part of electromagnetic field, which somehow appeared to describe ...
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123 views

How exactly and WHY does matter affect space-time? [closed]

According to general relativity, inertial mass and gravitational mass are the same, and all accelerated reference frames (such as a uniformly rotating reference frame with its proper time dilation) ...
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51 views

Accelerating masses lose energy?

If I understand this correctly, accelerating charges lose energy in the form of EM waves because they change the electric and magnetic fields, which "costs" energy. Does that mean that accelerating ...
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How do we know gravity isn't acceleration? [closed]

If an accelerometer sitting at rest on the earths surface measures 1 G of acceleration upward. How do we know "space" (the reference) isn't rushing down into the earth. I mean experimentally that's ...
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What would be walking speed in low gravity?

In $1g$ the average adult human walks 4-5 km in an hour. How fast would such a human walk in a low gravity environment such as on the Moon $(0.17g)$ or Titan $(0.14g)$? Let's ignore the effects of ...
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62 views

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy?

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy? Does it have to do with dark matter or coarse graining in the universe? Is it unique to general relativity, or there are predictions from quantum mechanics as ...
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58 views

Does the earth gets closer to the sun?

We know that the sun loses an amount of it's mass equivalent to the amount of energy it produces, according to the E=mc² equation. so the sun is losing mass every second. Does this affect the ...
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Hydrostatic pressure at the center of a water planet [duplicate]

If we take an imaginary planet which consists entirely of water (i.e. a big ball of water in space), what would be the pressure at the center of it? My friend argued that it would be zero, since the ...
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Physics behind a match performing a trick on center of mass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ucdw0DDI4n8 I've seen another variation where the whole match stick turned to ash. What's going on in this trick?
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Can we think of gravity as space itself moving?

So if you move through space with a constant acceleration you experience longer time dilation than when you're at rest, but you also experience the same time dilation when you're under the effect of ...
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Gravity of very distant objects

As far as I know stars emit a finite number of photons in all directions in a given period of time and as an observer goes further away he experiences less and less photons to the point where the ...
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How stupid is this theory of gravity? [closed]

As will be evident, I am not a physicist. I've always been interested in physics but my education tapered out with general relativity and basic quantum mechanics, years ago. Several years ago a sort ...
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What happens to gravity in the middle of the earth? [duplicate]

So I was curious about, what if we make a tunnel from one side of the earth, to the other side of the earth? Gravity is ofcourse always negative, which makes you "fall" and not "float". If we take ...
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about the rotation of the earth and gravity, when all continents were merged

A long time ago, I read that the gravity force isn't the same if you are near the Andes Mountains or if you are at Paris. So today I asked to myself if when all continents were one, if the difference ...
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69 views

Is it possible to affect the trajectory of a black hole?

Basically is the black hole itself affected by the matter going into it? Does it either get pulled by gravity toward things or have its own velocity affected by matter that "impacts" it?
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How does the Einstein Equivalence Principle imply a spacetime with a metric (and a connection)?

I have at hand the book by Clifford Will, "Theory and Experiments in Gravitational Physics", and the following Living Reviews in Relativity article. He quotes the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) ...
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Proper time in Nordstrom gravity

This wikipedia article claims that there are two interpretations of Nordstrom's scalar theory of gravity: 1) A scalar field theory on flat space. The reason why an apple falls is that its mass is ...