0
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0answers
3 views

Is my interpretation of how a gravitational wave is formed correct?

I'm sure many here are familiar with the following image showing the 2D representation of how the fabric of spacetime is warped by the presence of mass:- Can this fabric be interpreted as an ...
4
votes
1answer
78 views

Can light produce weak gravitational waves?

I have read online that light can produce a weak gravitational field (for example antiparallel beams should, in principle, attract weakly). This made me wonder if light can produce minute ...
-1
votes
0answers
38 views

What is Mathematical equation of gravitational waves? [duplicate]

The Cosmic catastrophe is a thought experiment in which the sun were to instantaneously disappear. The question is what would then happen to the Earth? the disappearance of the Sun would create ...
4
votes
4answers
161 views

Applications of the Linearized Einstein Field Equations (EFE)

Look up linearized Einstein field equations anywhere and the first thing you'll see will be a discussion of gravitational waves. Using the linearized EFE's is pretty handy when studying gravitational ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Do gravitational waves travel on geodesics in GR? If yes, why?

I think, the answer is probably yes, but it can be answered by somebody who knows GR much better than I do. In case of a positive answer, can we say that gravitational radiation will be bent around ...
0
votes
2answers
99 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Why point mass leaves it's own gravitational well? [closed]

I suppose that point mass has its own gravitational well. Why this point mass is still attracted by other gravitational waves. I expect that this point mass is surrounded by "gravitational hills". Why ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

Are gravitational waves transverse or longitudinal waves, or do they have unique/unknown properties? [duplicate]

Gravitational waves propagate through a medium of space-time. Are they traverse waves or longitudinal waves? Or do they propagate without oscillating?
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Geodesic Deviation between Test Particles from Gravitational Wave

I'm having trouble understanding how Carroll (Spacetime and Geometry p.296) explains the effect of a passing gravitational wave on test particles. If we have two geodesics with tangents $\vec{U}$, ...
5
votes
0answers
186 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor of a Gravitational Wave

In radiation gauge ($\gamma=0$), the Einstein field equation in vacuum for a perturbation $\gamma_{\mu\nu}:=g_{\mu\nu}-\eta_{\mu\nu}$ is given by $$ \boxed{ \partial^\alpha\partial_\alpha ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Specific problems with the quadrupole formulation of gravitational radiation

the quadrupole formula has some counterintuitive consequences, when analysing the power output averaged over a period $$ P = \langle \frac{d^3 Q_{ij}}{dt^3} \frac{d^3 Q_{ij}}{dt^3} \rangle $$ ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

gravitational waves and orders of magnitude

I have a question about numerical magnitude in eq. 6.110 of this reference. So, using this reference sheet for this PSR1913+16 binary, I get the following numbers: $$M = 2.8 \times 10^{30} ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Do Gravitational Waves Actually Repel Spacetime?

I read something explaining that g-waves actually repel space-time. It described the following. Mass bends space-time creating gravity. An object like the sun, if it suddenly disappeared the ...
11
votes
2answers
629 views

Why gravity is a spin-2 field? How can I read the spin from Einstein-Hilbert action?

I have often heard that the gravitational field has spin $2$. How can I read the spin of the field from the Einstein-Hilbert action $$S=\int \! \mathrm{d}^4x \,\sqrt{|g|} \, \mathcal{R} \, \, \, ?$$
1
vote
1answer
284 views

Riemann curvature tensor in first order perturbation theory as a Lie derivative of Riemann curvature tensor in zero order

I am having a difficulty solving my homework so I was hoping I could get some help, so here it is. It is about gravitational waves and first order gravitational perturbation theory, I have to prove ...
7
votes
3answers
290 views

Do gravitational waves cause time dilatation?

The effect of gravitational waves in transverse traceless gauge on matter is represented by the expansion and contraction of a ring of test particles in the direction of polarization of the wave. ...
7
votes
2answers
258 views

Do photons and cosmic rays radiate energy through gravitational waves? If not, why not?

Due to the mass-energy equivalence, both matter and EM radiation bend spacetime, and both are capable of forming singularities (black hole, white hole/kugelblitz). In light of this, why do photons ...
3
votes
1answer
224 views

Why has a gravitational wave spin 2? (Group theoretically?)

How can I see, using group theoretic arguments, that a the quantum of a gravitational wave has spin 2? How can one show that it is described by a 5 dimensional representation of $SO(3)$? I know the ...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

Pauli-Fierz “massive” equation and linearized gravity

It it known that the massive spin-2 irreducible representation of the Poincare group is the traceless symmetrical transverse 4-tensor $h_{\mu \nu}$ with rank 2: $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})h_{\mu \nu} = ...
4
votes
1answer
115 views

Field action of linearized gravity associated with spin-2 particle in Thorne book

In MTW book there is one exercise in which there was proposed to discuss linearized tensor gravity, which is represented as $$ g_{\mu \nu} = \eta_{\mu \nu} + h_{\mu \nu}, \quad \eta_{\mu \nu} = ...
3
votes
2answers
410 views

How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Gravitational waves as information carriers

Is it possible to utilize gravitational waves as a delivery system for information between two observers straddling the event horizon of a black hole? And why ?
4
votes
0answers
73 views

What are the current experimental restrictions of the possible speeds of gravitation?

Somewhere I read that the Hulse-taylor binary pulsar can not differentiate between competing theories assuming different speeds of gravity. Is it mathematically true in general, that the orbital decay ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

One more time about the connection of Weyl tensor and gravitational waves

There is differential identity with Weyl tensor and energy-momentum tensor: $$ D^{\lambda}C_{\lambda \alpha \sigma \beta} = 4 \pi G \left(D_{\sigma}T_{\alpha \beta} - D_{\beta}T_{\alpha \sigma} + ...
2
votes
1answer
249 views

The Weyl tensor and gravitational waves

How exactly is the Weyl tensor is connected with information about gravitational waves? And what are physical reasons for that?
1
vote
3answers
552 views

Why gravity is an attractive force? [duplicate]

Why gravity is an attractive force? One may say that it is because of space time curvature but General Relativity is built on this law: $\displaystyle G \frac{m_1 \times m_2}{r^2}$ (To be more ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Is weak lensing the statistical effect of microlensing?

I am looking into the effects of gravitational lensing of gravitational waves. I know that gravitons travel along null geodesics, just as photons, and so they will suffer the same deflection angle by ...
4
votes
1answer
230 views

Boundary conditions of relativistic wave solutions?

If you take Einstein's field equations, \begin{equation} R_{\mu\nu}-\tfrac{1}{2}g_{\mu\nu}R = -\kappa T_{\mu\nu}, \end{equation} and you insert the metric \begin{equation} g_{\mu\nu} = \eta_{\mu\nu} ...
2
votes
3answers
480 views

Why is $\langle \partial_{\mu} f(x) \rangle=0$?

I'm reading page 488 of Hobson, Efstathiou & Lasenby, and I don't understand something they write... so I came here. The concept they describe is in linearised general relativity. In particular, ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Why must the gravitational wave components be much less than unity?

We start with the metric tensor \begin{equation} g_{\mu\nu}(x) = \eta_{\mu\nu} + h_{\mu\nu}(x) \end{equation} in the linearised theory, or \begin{equation} g_{\mu\nu}(x) = \bar{g}_{\mu\nu}(x) + ...
10
votes
3answers
549 views

Since there are gravitational lenses, are there gravitational mirrors?

Gravitational lensing is an observed phenomenon. Can one have a gravitational mirror? A slightly unrelated question: Can gravitational waves be reflected?
6
votes
0answers
184 views

Would warp bubbles emit gravitational Cerenkov radiation in general relativity?

Inspired by the gravtiomagnetic analogy, I would expect that just as a charged tachyon would emit normal (electromagetic) Cerenkov radiation, any mass-carrying warp drive would emit gravitational ...
21
votes
2answers
1k views

Are gravitational waves longitudinal or transverse?

Waves are generally classified as either transverse or longitudinal depending on the they way the propagated quantity is oriented with respect to the direction of propagation. Then what is a ...
5
votes
1answer
298 views

What is the status of existing measurements of the speed of gravity?

In replying to a recent question I stated: Gravitational waves have not been yet experimentally observed so as to have their velocity measured. Which after the fact prompted me to try and verify ...
4
votes
2answers
140 views

Will cosmological gravitational waves be weaker or stronger than astrophysical ones?

Will gravitational waves of cosmological origin be weaker or stronger (higher amplitude $h \simeq\Delta L/L$) than those created from astrophysical sources? I'm having a real hard time finding the ...
4
votes
1answer
201 views

Event Horizon fluctuating due to gravitational waves

Do the interiors of black-holes create gravitational waves and if so do these waves cause the radius of the event horizon to fluctuate as the waves pass the horizon ?
0
votes
0answers
81 views

Counterpart of the Klein Gordon Equation on the “Coordinate Shell”

The relation $$\psi=Ce^{i/\hbar(Et-\mathbf{p}\cdot\mathbf{x})}\tag{1}$$ satisfies the Klein Gordon equation on the mass shell, i.e. for $E^2=p^2+m^2$. Now let's think in the reverse direction. ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

variations of Einstein equations with conversion between gravitational and non-gravitational energy

I'm looking for existing papers studying a variation to Einstein equation that does not rely on the annoying matter conservation identity: $$ T_{\mu \nu; \nu} = 0 $$ And instead tries to equate the ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Emitting gravitational radiation

Is the following true: Two massive bodies with variable distance between them do not emit GR in any direction Two bodies that revolve around common center will not emit in the plane of their orbits ...
7
votes
1answer
584 views

warp drive with gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime

gravitational waves are strictly transversal (in the linear regime at least), also their amplitudes are tiny even for cosmic scale events like supernovas or binary black holes (at least far away, ...
2
votes
1answer
147 views

How do gravitational waves sustain and propagate large scale spacetime curvature?

I understand that gravity in GR is a manifestation spacetime curvature dictated by the field equations by the principle that objects follow the geodesic path in spacetime. And, I get how ...
2
votes
2answers
302 views

How does gravitation propagate along curved spacetime?

In this wikipedia article it is described how a beam of light, with its locally constant speed, can travel "faster than light". That is to say it travels a distance, which, from a special relativistic ...
6
votes
1answer
197 views

What makes us think we can actually detect gravitational waves?

This refers to the discussion about gravitational waves for the YouTube video LIGO Gravitational Wave Observatory. I have two questions: When the gravitational wave passes through the space where ...
7
votes
2answers
673 views

Can colliding gravitational waves create a black hole?

Whether gravitational waves are real or just a coordinate freedom was argued in the early days of GR. Eventually the conclusion was that they were real. And if they are 'real' then I'm curious if... ...
11
votes
4answers
833 views

Why is there a search for an exchange particle for gravity?

If I understand correctly, according to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, mass results in a distortion in space-time. In turn, the motion of the mass is affected by the distortion. A result of ...