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3
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1answer
88 views

Can LIGO measure anything?

LIGO, Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, is a large-scale physics experiment aiming to directly detect gravitational waves. The device measures the phase shift laser beams. If I ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Research Problem in Gravitation [on hold]

I did my M.Phil project on gravitational waves. It was completely a review work. It included calculation of energy momentum tensor for fields in the weak field limit, quadrupole approximation for the ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Why doesn't linear wave theory produce phase velocities that agree with each other?

I'm not sure I understand the dispersion relationship for water waves. According to Wikipedia, the wavelength of ocean wave at arbitrary depth is given by: \begin{equation} ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Can a gravitational wave produce oscillating time dilation?

I was reading about gravitational waves and about laser based detectors. I also read this. As mentioned in the answer, when ever there is a deformation in spacetime, doesn't it also create a minute ...
4
votes
2answers
947 views

Is my interpretation of how a gravitational wave is formed correct?

I'm sure many here are familiar with the following image showing the 2D representation of how the fabric of spacetime is warped by the presence of mass:- Can this fabric be interpreted as an ...
2
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0answers
32 views

Can a general n-body system emit gravitational waves?

I know that (for example) binary neutron stars can emit radiation in the form of gravitational waves. This question got me thinking about the case of three or more objects. I wrote in my answer that ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Why are nonrelativistic methods used in binary pulsar systems (gravitational waves)?

Although gravitational waves are a subject of the General Relativity, why do most books use Newtonian equations of motion for power radiated and rate of change of eccentricity calculations? In most ...
16
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1answer
711 views

Can gravitational waves be red-shifted?

Whenever the Doppler effect is mentioned, it's typically in the context of sound waves or electromagnetic radiation. On the cosmological scale, red-shifting is also important because of the enormous ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Are there other places to look for the gravitational wave, other than space?

The recent BICEP2 announcements about the existence of gravity waves made the news, and made a big pitch for cosmic inflation, in the process they also claimed to detect the existence of gravitational ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Can light produce weak gravitational waves?

I have read online that light can produce a weak gravitational field (for example antiparallel beams should, in principle, attract weakly). This made me wonder if light can produce minute ...
5
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4answers
196 views

Applications of the Linearized Einstein Field Equations (EFE)

Look up linearized Einstein field equations anywhere and the first thing you'll see will be a discussion of gravitational waves. Using the linearized EFE's is pretty handy when studying gravitational ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

Do gravitational waves travel on geodesics in GR? If yes, why?

I think, the answer is probably yes, but it can be answered by somebody who knows GR much better than I do. In case of a positive answer, can we say that gravitational radiation will be bent around ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Why don't atoms emit gravitational waves?

Atom's do not seem to emit gravitational waves. But they do contain changing mass quadrupoles, though very small ones. Obviously, the probability for emission of such waves is very small, as the ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Accelerating masses lose energy?

If I understand this correctly, accelerating charges lose energy in the form of EM waves because they change the electric and magnetic fields, which "costs" energy. Does that mean that accelerating ...
0
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2answers
108 views

Particles Associated With Gravitational Waves

I've been reading about linearized GR and the study of gravitational waves, and an odd thought popped into my head. According to wave-particle duality (admittedly, usually used in quantum mechanics!), ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

Why point mass leaves it's own gravitational well? [closed]

I suppose that point mass has its own gravitational well. Why this point mass is still attracted by other gravitational waves. I expect that this point mass is surrounded by "gravitational hills". Why ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

Why does the earth have to feel a pull when something falls?

Heck, I'm not even worried about the speed of a reaction. But remember that if I fall towards the earth, with a force, the earth has the same force exerted upon it in the opposite direction. I was ...
3
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0answers
35 views

How do inflationary models predict the generation of gravitational waves during the inflationary period?

Recent results from the BICEP2 experiment have produced a lot of talk about the primordial gravitational waves produced during the inflationary period. I would like to have some explanation about how ...
5
votes
2answers
275 views

gravitational waves and inflation theory

I am not a technical guy and I have no scientific knowloedge in physics but I have been reading books, watching videos in order to understand our cosmology and ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Are gravitational waves transverse or longitudinal waves, or do they have unique/unknown properties? [duplicate]

Gravitational waves propagate through a medium of space-time. Are they traverse waves or longitudinal waves? Or do they propagate without oscillating?
0
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0answers
23 views

gravitational force [duplicate]

why does gravitational force of the earth decrease when we move towards the center of the earth whereas it depends on the radius of the earth.The radius of the earth also decreases when we move ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Geodesic Deviation between Test Particles from Gravitational Wave

I'm having trouble understanding how Carroll (Spacetime and Geometry p.296) explains the effect of a passing gravitational wave on test particles. If we have two geodesics with tangents $\vec{U}$, ...
5
votes
0answers
201 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor of a Gravitational Wave

In radiation gauge ($\gamma=0$), the Einstein field equation in vacuum for a perturbation $\gamma_{\mu\nu}:=g_{\mu\nu}-\eta_{\mu\nu}$ is given by $$ \boxed{ \partial^\alpha\partial_\alpha ...
9
votes
1answer
55 views

LIGO sensitivity in terms of minimum received power per area

I've been looking at LIGO figures for gravitational wave sensitivity here and it seem to be displayed in an adimensional strain ratio (which I assume that is more or less equivalent to metric ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Specific problems with the quadrupole formulation of gravitational radiation

the quadrupole formula has some counterintuitive consequences, when analysing the power output averaged over a period $$ P = \langle \frac{d^3 Q_{ij}}{dt^3} \frac{d^3 Q_{ij}}{dt^3} \rangle $$ ...
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0answers
30 views

gravitational waves and orders of magnitude

I have a question about numerical magnitude in eq. 6.110 of this reference. So, using this reference sheet for this PSR1913+16 binary, I get the following numbers: $$M = 2.8 \times 10^{30} ...
3
votes
0answers
131 views

Computing linearized gravitational wave emission from point-like masses

I'm trying to compute the gravitational wavefront created from a set of moving masses. I'm trying to apply the equation $$ h_{jk} = \frac{2}{r} \frac{d^2 Q_{jk}}{dt^2}$$ Where $h$ is the linearized ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

Noise in laboratory sources of gravitational waves

Suppose you wanted to detect gravitational waves from a lab source (I know, any reasonable man-made source will be several orders of magnitude below detection technology, but humor me for a second). ...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

Do Gravitational Waves Actually Repel Spacetime?

I read something explaining that g-waves actually repel space-time. It described the following. Mass bends space-time creating gravity. An object like the sun, if it suddenly disappeared the ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

What Happens When A Gravitational Wave Interacts With Another One?

If two gravitational waves came in contact with each other what would happen? In another question entirely, what happens when a higher gravitational field interacts with a weaker one.
11
votes
2answers
688 views

Why gravity is a spin-2 field? How can I read the spin from Einstein-Hilbert action?

I have often heard that the gravitational field has spin $2$. How can I read the spin of the field from the Einstein-Hilbert action $$S=\int \! \mathrm{d}^4x \,\sqrt{|g|} \, \mathcal{R} \, \, \, ?$$
0
votes
1answer
68 views

speed of gravitational waves [duplicate]

Do gravitational waves have a certain speed? Is it the speed of light or infinite, or am I misunderstanding what a gravitational wave is? I think it is a ripple in spacetime caused by interactions ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Are gravitons bound by the event horizon?

I understand that photons, even when traveling at the speed of light, cannot escape the event horizon of a black hole. Are gravitons and other virtual particles traveling at the speed of light also ...
0
votes
2answers
260 views

gravitational waves

Now that scientists found the primordial gravitational waves that formed shortly after the big bang,and we all now that just after the bang the 4 fundamental forces were unified can we consider that ...
1
vote
1answer
343 views

Riemann curvature tensor in first order perturbation theory as a Lie derivative of Riemann curvature tensor in zero order

I am having a difficulty solving my homework so I was hoping I could get some help, so here it is. It is about gravitational waves and first order gravitational perturbation theory, I have to prove ...
0
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0answers
53 views

What are the implications of the possibility that the BICEP2 results are caused by a self ordering scalar field transition?

I've found this interesting paper that mentions another possible way to interpret the recent BICEP2 results, and that hadn't been ruled out yet 1. As interesting as the possibility that the BICEP2 ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

The gravity waves from the big bang? How can we know?

The latest news says that scientists detected gravitational waves from the Big Bang. My question is how do they know the waves originated in the big bang verses any number of supernovae and or ...
7
votes
3answers
346 views

Do gravitational waves cause time dilatation?

The effect of gravitational waves in transverse traceless gauge on matter is represented by the expansion and contraction of a ring of test particles in the direction of polarization of the wave. ...
8
votes
1answer
137 views

In the B mode power spectrum, what is the relationship between the multipole number and the wavelength of the seed gravitational waves?

One of the key datasets of the recent BICEP2 results is the B mode power spectrum shown below. The existence of these B modes implies the existence of gravitational waves prior to inflation. My ...
7
votes
1answer
240 views

The BICEP2 data are evidence of gravitational waves and of inflation. Are they also the first observation that requires quantum gravity?

It strikes me that the recent announcement of data from BICEP2 contains two really Big Deals: the first evidence of gravitational waves the first evidence of inflation. Is there also a third? ...
3
votes
0answers
160 views

What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?

The BICEP2 results, unless I am mistaken, are a measurement of CMB polarization, i.e. photon polarization. That is, taken at face value they say nothing about gravity directly. Now, we can start to ...
5
votes
1answer
265 views

What do the BICEP2 results mean for string gas cosmology and the ekpyrotic universe?

The imprint of gravitational waves created shortly after the big bang may offer direct evidence for inflation theory, according to a discovery by the BICEP2 experiment at the South Pole and released ...
74
votes
5answers
6k views

What was the major discovery on gravitational waves made March 17th, 2014, in the BICEP2 experiment?

The Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics held a press conference today to announce a major discovery relating to gravitational waves. What was their announcement, and what are the implications? ...
7
votes
2answers
273 views

Do photons and cosmic rays radiate energy through gravitational waves? If not, why not?

Due to the mass-energy equivalence, both matter and EM radiation bend spacetime, and both are capable of forming singularities (black hole, white hole/kugelblitz). In light of this, why do photons ...
3
votes
1answer
236 views

Why has a gravitational wave spin 2? (Group theoretically?)

How can I see, using group theoretic arguments, that a the quantum of a gravitational wave has spin 2? How can one show that it is described by a 5 dimensional representation of $SO(3)$? I know the ...
8
votes
3answers
262 views

Do two photons traveling in opposite directions emit gravitational waves?

Do two photons traveling in opposite directions emit gravitational waves? If so, does it mean that any volume filled with photon gas will eventually degrade into graviton gas? In other words, if flat ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Is there a probability that an electron in an atom change its energy level due to emitting gravitational wave?

Is there a probability that an electron in an atom change its orbital by emitting a quantum of gravitational radiation instead of photon?
2
votes
1answer
225 views

Pauli-Fierz “massive” equation and linearized gravity

It it known that the massive spin-2 irreducible representation of the Poincare group is the traceless symmetrical transverse 4-tensor $h_{\mu \nu}$ with rank 2: $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})h_{\mu \nu} = ...
4
votes
1answer
124 views

Field action of linearized gravity associated with spin-2 particle in Thorne book

In MTW book there is one exercise in which there was proposed to discuss linearized tensor gravity, which is represented as $$ g_{\mu \nu} = \eta_{\mu \nu} + h_{\mu \nu}, \quad \eta_{\mu \nu} = ...
3
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2answers
492 views

How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...