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2
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1answer
53 views

Gravitational redshift in a general stationary metric

Suppose you have a general metric $g_{\mu \nu}(t,r,\theta,\phi)$ which don't depend explicitly on $t$ coordinate, i.e a stationary metric. Light travels along a geodesic from A (at which the frequency ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Time and gravity relation

I was reading about relativity when I crossed by the applications of relativity in real life, and they said that as the elevation increase time increase so gravity decrease Can someone explain to me, ...
2
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2answers
74 views

'Doppler redshift' Vs 'Cosmological redshift'

It is not difficult to understand the differences between 'Doppler redshift' and 'Cosmological redshift' conceptually. But how do astronomers distinguish them when doing observations?
1
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2answers
73 views

Does sending current upwards reduce the voltage?

I was thinking about relativistic situation of having a vertical wire on a neutron star or high-gravity environment and then say if I send current upwards (away from the ground) will the voltage be ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Why do we say the universe is expanding faster and faster [duplicate]

The further we look away, the more redshift and expansion. But isn't looking further away looking back in time? Why do we not say that the younger universe (further away) was expanding faster and ...
3
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1answer
41 views

Is there any way to differentiate between a redshift caused by recessional motion vs. gravity?

How certain, if at all, are astronomers that the redshift they are measuring is relating to recessional motion as opposed to gravity?
4
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3answers
423 views

Do photons lose energy due to gravitational redshift? If so, where does the lost energy go? [duplicate]

In the gravitational redshift, the frequency of photons radiated from some source is reduced. As the energy of a photon is given by $\hbar\omega$, if the frequency is reduced where is the lost energy? ...
6
votes
4answers
474 views

Can we change a photon's frequency in mid-air?

Can we have a light source emitting photons in the infrared range and after, lets say, 5 meters, these photons become a photon in the x-ray range? The only way I know we can change a photon's ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Big bang red shift verification

So I have read on proofs for the Big Bang theory as it appears to be a bit far-fetched to me (the layman). I mean, definitely there is some genius mathematics behind the fancy yet inaccurate ...
3
votes
5answers
360 views

Does coordinate time have physical meaning?

I have always been a little confused by the meaning of the "$t$" which appears in spacetime intervals or metrics in general relativity. I concluded that $t$ was just a mathematical thing which allow ...
7
votes
2answers
357 views

Measurement of blueshift from Andromeda galaxy

How the blueshift from Andromeda galaxy was measured? Since the measurement of blueshift/redshift has to do with the identification of relative distance of spectral lines how this identification is ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Proof of expression to combine different redshifts

I am trying to arrive to the following expression: $1+z = (1+z_C)(1+z_G)(1+z_D)$ so the total redshift is the product of the cosmological redshift, the gravitational redshift and the Doppler ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Is there any difference in radiation pressure for two observers in different gravitational potential?

Suppose that a light beam is shone upwards from surface of a planet. So, due to gravitational redshift, the frequency of the light perceived by observer far from the surface will be lower than that ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Viewing a Time-Dilated Space

I'm fascinated by space and physics but not exactly well-versed in them, so I'll try to keep this question as simple as possible. Imagine a person acting as an observer in a room with two large ...
0
votes
0answers
94 views

In the Pound-Rebka experiment, does light lose energy?

In the Pound–Rebka experiment the redshift / blueshift of photons is measured in small distances. This experiment one explain by the influence of gravitational field on the photon: "When the photon ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Gravity's effects on photons moving away from source

As a photon has no mass and must always have velocity c, if I were to shine a laser straight up (so Earth's gravity would be pulling straight back on it), what would the effect be on the photon? It ...
6
votes
3answers
847 views

Other explanation for cosmological redshift?

I'm interested if any of the following explanations have enough predictive capability to explain the observations we see today. The claim is that the Universe is not expanding, and that red-shift of ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

Does the universe expansion theory take into account that light emitted by massive stars is red-shifted?

I have recently noticed this answer by wetsavannaanimal to a Physics.SE question, if a star is not a black hole, light shone upwards will escape the star's gravitational field, although light is ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Does light lose energy in transit?

Consider a photon is an energetic particle and therefore has a gravitational field. When a photon passes a molecule or particle of dust in space it will pull the dust towards it and deform the dust. ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Quasars with differing emission / absorption redshifts

I was reading this (perhaps offbeat) "anti-big-bang" article, http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/hubble/ and the author comments "a recent catalog of objects having very large redshifts shows that among ...
1
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2answers
51 views

When gravity pulls on light it blueshifts or redshifts it, which way around does it go?

when light is propagating away from a mass does it get blue shifted or red shifted? And if its going towards a mass whats the effect?
2
votes
1answer
80 views

How is CMB related to the temperature of the universe

As I understand it, CMB (cosmic microwave background) is the radiation emitted when matter decoupled at the early stages of the big bang. The thing I don't understand is do all stars emit this kind of ...
0
votes
2answers
120 views

When the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation cools, where does the energy go? [duplicate]

I understand how photons can change wavelength via gravitational redshifting, but that doesn't seem to be what's going on with the CMB radiation. I've heard it explained as happening because of the ...
-1
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2answers
90 views

More about gravitation as the source of redshift of light beams [closed]

In the realm of physics there is no knowledge, the justification of which does not depend either upon experience or upon reason. In the light of the findings of the preconditions of knowledge made in ...
4
votes
2answers
137 views

Do black holes cause gravitational redshift? [duplicate]

Suppose a light ray is emitted by a light source very close to the black hole's singularity away from the black hole's gravitational center. Why won't the light escape? Shouldn't the massive gravity ...
2
votes
5answers
265 views

Is it possible that galaxies' redshift is caused by something else than the expansion of space?

I was thinking that maybe photons loss energy naturally when they travel great distances. Or maybe the mass of all matter is increasing over time and therefore photons emitted in the past are ...
7
votes
1answer
209 views

Differentiating the gravitational redshift and the cosmological redshift?

If general relativity accounts for a redshift, independent of inflation, how can we still know that inflation is viable? Moreover, how do we differentiate the the gravitational redshift and the ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Luminosity distance from angular diameter distance

Consider that I know the cosmological angular diameter distance at a given redshift : $$D_{A}\left(z\right)=\frac{x_{object}}{\theta_{observer}}$$ Is there a general formula to compute the ...
1
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2answers
72 views

Interpretation of red shift

We see light as having travelled in a straight line from stars or galaxies light years away from us. However it's path is more likely of multiple curves as a result of gravity along the journey ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

How Are Galaxies Receding Faster Than Light Visible To Observers?

We know that some galaxies are moving away from us faster than the speed of light and we know it by measuring the redshift, but how's that possible? If they're moving away say at 2c, how would the ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Calculating Hubble Radius using relativistic effects

I am trying to calculate the Hubble Radius, or the distance from which an object will recede from an observer at the speed of light. I initially tried using $v=H_0d$ which gives $d=1.424\times10^{26}$ ...
2
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0answers
95 views

General formula to compute the redshift (first order perturbations)

Consider an expanding universe with the following metric in conformal time/co-moving coordinates: ...
3
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0answers
88 views

Gravitational redshift of temperature and electrostatic potential

Consider a charged black hole in four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, with charge $Q$, mass $M>Q$: $ds^2=-f(r)dt^2+\frac{1}{f(r)}dr^2+r^2d\Omega_2^2$, with $f(r)=1-\frac{2M}{r}+\frac{Q^2}{r^2}$. ...
1
vote
2answers
169 views

Questions on redshift [closed]

What are different kinds of redshifts and are they related to each other? If yes, how? Is redshift a measure of distance or time or etc? For example when we say a supernova with a redshift of $z=0.9$ ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

While falling into a black hole, what color would the flashlight have?

If, hypothetically, me and my rocket powered flashlight were falling straight toward the center of a black hole. The flashlight is a few kilometers behind me in our travels toward the center of the ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Red Shift Effects

I dong know much about physics, but I was curious about the red shift effect. I think I have the basic idea of it down in that as an object 1 accelerates from object 2 the light from object 1 will ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Cosmological and gravitational redshift in physics

I am interested in knowing what are the differences between gravitational and cosmological redshifts?
2
votes
2answers
774 views

About the standard derivation of the gravitational redshift

The objective is to derive the gravitational redshift ONLY from the Einstein's equivalence principle (E.E.P.), without using the whole theory of Relativity. This is the standard "informal" derivation ...
15
votes
1answer
2k views

Euclidean derivation of the black hole temperature; conical singularities

I am studying the derivation of the black hole temperature by means of the Euclidean approach, i.e. by Wick rotating, compactifying the Euclidean time and identifying the period with the inverse ...
1
vote
1answer
102 views

Relativity question: frequency shift under constant acceleration

Okay, my buddy tells me this: Let there be a starship, ovoid, and me and my buddy stand each at the extremities of the ship, him below the roof, me on the floor. We start a journey and the ship ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

General expression of the redshift: explanation?

In some papers, authors put the following formula for the cosmological redshift $z$ : $1+z=\frac{\left(g_{\mu\nu}k^{\mu}u^{\nu}\right)_{S}}{\left(g_{\mu\nu}k^{\mu}u^{\nu}\right)_{O}}$ where : $S$ ...
5
votes
0answers
189 views

Gravitational redshift of Hawking radiation

How can Hawking radiation with a finite (greather than zero) temperature come from the event horizon of a black hole? A redshifted thermal radiation still has Planck spectrum but with the lower ...
1
vote
1answer
244 views

Pound-Rebka-Snider experiment in the inertial frame

In Schutz's book (page 120), Schutz first derives the gravitational redshift in the PRS experiment in a previous paragraph. $\frac{\nu^{\prime}}{\nu}=\frac{m}{m+mgh+O(v^4)}=1-gh+O(v^4)$. Here ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

Gravitational Redshift between spacecraft

I am trying to determine the frequency redshift when a signal is sent between two spacecraft orbiting a star at different radii. I have not been able to find a formula for this, I can only find ...
4
votes
1answer
215 views

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are?

What's the difference between looking at a star from a black hole and looking at it from empty space? My guess is that the curvature of space-time distorts the wavelength of light thus changing the ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Gravitational Redshift around a Schwarzschild Black Hole

Let's say that I'm hovering in a rocket at constant spatial coordinates outside a Schwarzschild black hole. I drop a bulb into the black hole, and it emits some light at a distance of $r_e$ from the ...
-1
votes
1answer
537 views

Gravitational redshift derivation

When we derive gravitational potential it is dependant only on (rest) mass $m$, but i have seen a derivation of gravitational redshift equation placing relativistic mass $\widetilde{m}$ instead of ...
2
votes
4answers
552 views

Redshift of light in dark matter

Following Edwin Hubble, it is widely believed that the universe is expanding, which is based on the red-shift of light from distant objects. Can dark matter cause light to be red-shifted and make it ...
5
votes
6answers
346 views

Why are distant galaxies not actually tiny bits of matter?

Distant galaxies are said to be moving away from the Milky Way (and us) at speeds approaching the speed of light. Since Special Relativity tells us that any object moving away from us at a velocity of ...
1
vote
1answer
228 views

How to relate photon's higher frequency to time dilation?

The usual explanation for photon's higher frequency in lower altitudes (higher gravity), when the photon is going downward towards a massive body, is that gravitational potential energy is converted ...