Graphene is a quasi-2D material formed by carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice. Graphene-based materials are of great interest for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, mainly for Nanoelectronics.

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Wavefunction overlap in graphene

In calculation of the response functions of graphene we need to calculate the 4-point correlation function of the form : $$ \langle T \rho(q,\tau)\rho(-q,0)\rangle $$ The article I'm reading states ...
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Graphene is organic or inorganic material?

I have confusion about graphene, whether the material is organic or inorganic. I read that materials with carbon backbone and hydrogens attached (basically hydrocarbons), or materials of living ...
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How can one confirm creation of magnetic graphene?

Recently my high school physics teacher contacted me looking for an expert to ask about this situation. I am paraphrasing his correspondence below: I just had a a student accidentally create ...
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Why are Brillouin zones for graphene and monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides the same?

The geometrical model of graphene is the flat honeycomb lattice, so the Brillouin zone is also flat honeycomb lattice. However, monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides is not flat as it consists ...
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Topological invariant in 1D

In 2D, with state $\psi(k_x, k_y)$, it is common to calculate measure of topology of material: 1 - Calculate Berry connection $a = -i <\psi | \partial_{\boldsymbol{k}} | \psi>$. 2 - Calculate ...
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2D materials with isotropic Dirac cones

The celebrated material graphene has electrons which can be described by the simple 2D Hamiltonian $H = v_F \left( \sigma_x p_x + \sigma_y p_y \right)$, where $v_F$ is a Fermi velocity. Silicene, ...
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How to plot graphene conductivity as a function of chemical potential and frequency

I want to plot Graphene Complex Conductivity as a function of two variables in Matlab.The variables are chemical potential and freqency, but I am not sure my code would be corect
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What does a bucked honeycomb lattice mean?

I was going through some literature where they have mention about bucked honeycomb lattice, but I was unable to understand about the bucked honeycomb term.
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Matrix representation of a fermionic creation and annihilation operator in graphene nanoribbons?

From the other question Matrix representation for fermionic annihilation operator, what if we have to find the matrix representation for the operators $a_{\sigma}^{\dagger}(k,n)$ and $b_{\sigma}(k,n)$ ...
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How to measure the Fermi velocity in Dirac materials?

Suppose that one has a Dirac material (e.g., graphene), i.e., a system where there exists a number $N$ of identical Dirac cones (linear dispersion) at the Fermi energy $E_F=0$. How can one measure ...
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What exactly makes transmittance of graphene change from linear to exponential?

Up to 5 layers, the transmittance of graphene is linear (2.3% per layer): (source) Beyond 5 layers (I assume) the transmittance is exponential, following Beer–Lambert law. What gives rise to this ...
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cicumfernatial vector

Once a sheet of graphite is rolled up into a nanotube, the allowed values of k are constrained by the imposition of periodic boundary conditions along the circumferential direction. this periodic ...
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what is the theoretical reason behind the new paper, Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators built using graphene?

A few days ago, a group of University of Exeter physicists published a paper titled: Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface ...
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How to cut graphene?

How is graphene cut, given that it is similar in strength and hardness to diamond? I assume you cannot just take a pair of regular scissors to a sheet of it and cut out the shape you want?
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Josephson junction exceeding the coherence length of the cooper pair

In this recent paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1504.03286, the authors present the data that they measured Fraunhofer-like diffraction pattern in a Josephson junction with graphene sandwiched between ...
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What does a sheet of graphene look like?

What does a sheet of graphene look like? At one atom thick, is it visible to the naked eye? Can it be handled (by hand) with being torn? Can it be felt at all? [Assuming a large enough sheet ...
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Density of states and elliptic integral

It is known, for example Equation (14) in the graphene review of Castro Neto (arXiv), that the full expression for the density of states (DOS) of graphene is in terms of an elliptic integral. Close ...
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Is there any conductive graphene with functional groups in markets or I have to modify graphene myself?

My thesis is a comparative study between 2 kind of nanocomposites based on graphene. We should use of graphene with and without functional groups and both should be electrical conductive. But I don't ...
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Why is graphene “gate tunable”?

I am reading Geim and Novoselov's classic paper on electrostatic doping of graphene: http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0410550 Three parts to the same broad question: 1) I am looking for some rigorous ...
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Classical - quantum analogy of Berry phase

I am reading this webpage about Berry phase: http://materia.fisica.unimi.it/manini/berryphase.html I am happily convinced about the first "elementary geometry" example they provide. Now I am trying ...
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Tuning the frequency in graphene

As is well known, the frequency of transverse optical phonons in single layer graphene ranges from $10^{11}$ to $10^{12}$ Hertz. How can one "tune" the frequency to a specific value?
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Why electron acts like massless when it's moving through graphene sheet? [duplicate]

It has been observed that when electron moves through graphene sheet,it shows a relativistic motion.why does that occurs?
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Electrons in graphene will behave as in 2D space?

Will electrons in graphene behave as in pure 2D space, that is they interact with eachother by a Coulomb potential ~ $\ln r$ instead of $1/r$? I think many force lines will "leak" out of graphene ...
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82 views

What is continuum limit (low energy limit) in condense matter physics?

In condensed matter theory, I can sometimes encounter such a term as continuum limit, also known as low energy limit. I have a question about this term, let me illustrate my question through an ...
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Are there measurable quantities which directly depends on the Fermi velocity?

The dispersion relation of electrons in, for example, graphene exhibits Dirac cones. The dispersion relation of a Dirac point at $\mathbf{k}=\mathbf{K}$ is linear in the momentum magnitude: $$E=\pm ...
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why do edge states in Graphene exist between the Valence and Conduction band?

I read in a review that there are 2 Dirac points in graphene, where the conduction band and valence band touch each other. Near these points electrons obey a linear dispersion relation. Breaking of ...
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What color does graphene glow when heated?

If you heat graphene hot enough, what color would it glow? Is the color within the visible range?
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How to calculate the dispersion relation of graphene?

Graphene is a well investigated two-dimensional material in nano-physics. My teacher asked me to calculate its phonon dispersion with interactions between the first and second nearest neighbors, both ...
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Is a “cathode ray drive” feasible?

When I saw the headline, Fuel Free Spacecrafts Using Graphene, I thought it was another reactionless drive, but it turned out to be a bit more plausible :) Original paper here. Long story short, ...
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Klein paradox in graphene

When considering the Klein paradox in graphene Katsnelson, Novoselov and Geim introduce a potential barrier (see http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/v2/n9/full/nphys384.html). But I cannot understand ...
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Importance of thickness of SiO2-substrate for observing graphene's monolayer

I've discovered that one should use 300-nm-thick SiO2 substrate in order to effectively observe graphene's monolayer through optical microscope. If thickness differs even by 5%, i.e. 315 nm, then ...
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Graphene - Can it produce a magnetic field?

So it's probably a quick no on this one, but since I haven't majored in physics or chemistry I have no idea if it's possible to make Graphene generate a magnetic field. Assuming power or current is ...
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Why graphene's substrate is important

I just have some feelings that somehow it is important what specific subtrate is used to grow graphene monolayer on. Some substrates are better, another ones are not so good. But I cannot completely ...
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Symmetry arguments for valley physics in graphene with broken inversion

I am trying to understand this paper: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.236809 (Here is an arXiv version: http://arxiv.org/abs/0709.1274) In the introduction, they mention certain ...
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Is graphene on a sticky tape strong enough to compete with my hand stretching it?

As we know we can make graphene using sticky tape so after we make graphene on a sticky tape will that thin sheet of graphene on a sticky tape be strong enough to compete with my hand trying to ...
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Why is graphene stronger than graphite?

Why is graphene stronger than graphite when graphene is just a single layer while graphite is multiple layers of graphene? And can't we say that diamond and coal also consist of layers of graphene as ...
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How to show time reversal symmetry does not break in the tight binding Hamiltonian for the honeycomb lattice?

The Hamiltonian of the honeycomb lattice is $$ H=\sum_{k\sigma}t(k) a_{k\sigma}^\dagger b_{k\sigma}+h.c $$ Where $t(-k)=t^*(k)$. If we do a time reversal transformation(according the answer to this ...
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Textbook on 2D Crystals

I've become interested in $2$D crystals, and in particular graphene. I'm looking for a textbook which covers graphene -- possibly as part of a course on solid state theory -- for undergraduates. For ...
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questions about graphene applications

i have read that if we had a sheet of graphene the thickness of cling wrap it would take a elephant on a pencil to pierce it (so two fucktons of psi?) but if graphene is so strong why is it when we ...
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What are the conditions of wave function continuity when solving for Dirac Spinors as done in “Klein paradox” paper by Novoselov?

In the paper "Chiral tunneling and Klein paradox" paper by Katsnelson, Novoselov, and Geim, they use the wave function for Dirac spinors. What are the conditions for continuity of the wave function ...
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Integrals in tight-binding method

In the tight-binding method, as e.g. described in Ashcroft and Mermin one need to solve a few integrals in order to proceed. For example for the overlap between an orbital situated at two different ...
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Is 'grapheme' a substance or a typo?

While reading Ref. 1 I came across the sentence Below we focus on the physics of ideal (single layer) grapheme. I did google search 'grapheme' but the results tended towards a completely ...
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Why is Graphene Transparent?

Graphene is always in the news now a days and its key features are that it is; very strong, conductive and transparent. It is so transparent that each layer of graphene will only absorb 2% of Light ...
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Why is Graphene So Strong?

There has been a lot of news about Graphene since its discovery in 2004. And as we are all told it is a revolutionary material which is very strong, conductive and transparent. But what is it about ...
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Why do we use the massive dirac fermion model for MoS2?

I can derive the massive Dirac fermion Hamiltonian using a tight binding model of graphene with a staggered sublattice potential, but many (including Xiao et al, PRL 2012) use this model for MoS2 as ...
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Why does graphene exist?

I started to read some articles on graphene and almost all say that graphene was discovered late because physicists thought it would be unstable. Despite this, I didn't found a clear explanation of ...
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How come graphene is considered to have two valleys?

The typical graphene band-structure is a double-cone (in opposite directions to each other) with Dirac point in the middle. I assume the bottom cone is like the valence band, while the top cone is ...
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How to generalize BdG equation in order to match a graphene with a metal superconductor?

I want to generalize BdG equation in order to compute the conductance of a junction of graphene with a metal superconductor. The previous works done until now on this hetrojunction is devotted to use ...
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How can pseudospin be a vector? (Graphene)

In graphene science, I don't understand how one interprets pseudospin as a vector. I thought 'pseudospin' was the vector of Pauli matrices. So how can it be a vector that one can plot for example in ...
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Deriving Graphene energy dispersion in tight binding model

I'm trying to get into graphene, in detail, I try to derive the elec. energy dispersion. Sadly, I am not that familiar with condensed matter QM by now, so I got some basic questions and I hope to find ...