A theory that describes how matter produces and responds to the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
3answers
216 views

Why Hausdorff and Paracompact manifold in GR?

What can we say about the transition map if the manifold is a Hausdorff space? Why do we need the manifolds to be Hausdorff and paracompact in General Relativity?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Acceleration in stationary spacetime

How would I show $ a^\mu = u^\nu \bigtriangledown u^\nu = \bigtriangledown^\mu lnV. $ for an observer instantaneously 'at rest,' where $u^\mu = dx^\mu/d\tau$ and $V^2 = -\xi_\mu \xi^\mu$ ($\xi^\mu$ ...
3
votes
0answers
25 views

Linear field approximation to gravitation

I'm attempting to learn about the linear field approximation for gravity, and I found a few resources that are helpful, but I am having trouble understanding the gauge invariance. I am attempting to ...
2
votes
0answers
30 views

Modified gravity and dark energy

Is there a model of modified gravity that either was close to or have succeeded in modelling the problem of dark energy, and suffers from no instabilities and explains the observational data. Also has ...
6
votes
4answers
583 views

How to measure the curvature of the space-time?

I know G.R. change our vision of space and time as a unique surface than can bend. We can associate the curvature of the space-time as the gravity created by the mass of planets, stars... But how can ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Ricci tensor of direct product of manifolds

Imagine I have a (Lorentzian) manifold with a metric $\left[ {\begin{array}{cc} g_{\mu\nu} &0\\ 0&g_{mn}\\ \end{array} } \right]$ Will the Ricci tensor be also block diagonal ...
3
votes
2answers
68 views

Asymptotic flatness implies existence of rotation axis

Suppose we have an asymptotically flat, globally hyperbolic spacetime $M$ endowed with two one-parameter isometry groups $\sigma_t$ and $\chi_{\phi}$ which commute (i.e. $\sigma_t \circ \chi_{\phi}= ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Is energy conserved in general relativity? Does $\nabla_aT^{ab}=0$ represent the conservation of energy and momentum?

For example, the radiation dominated cosmology, the energy density of radiation is propotional to $a^{-4}$ and the volume is propotional to $a^3$, where $a$ is the scale factor. So the total energy ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Energy-Momentum Tensor under Lorentz Transformation

In relativity, the symmetric energy-momentum tensor is given by $$ T^{ij}, $$ where $T^{00}$ is the energy density and $\frac{1}{c}T^{10}$ is the momentum density. Thus: $$ \left(\frac{1}{c}T^{00}dV, ...
5
votes
1answer
274 views

Does non-mass-energy generate a gravitational field?

At a very basic level I know that gravity isn't generated by mass but rather the stress-energy tensor and when I wave my hands a lot it seems like that implies that energy in $E^2 = (pc)^2 + (mc^2)^2$ ...
6
votes
0answers
72 views

Building a wormhole

We regularly get questions about wormholes on this site. See for example Negative Energy and Wormholes and How would you connect a destination to a wormhole from your starting point to travel through ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

Photons emitted at the event horizon?

While looking through the questions, a came across a section about black holes. I immediately though; what would happen if an atom is orbiting a black hole and emitted a photon perpendicular to the ...
2
votes
2answers
125 views

What are the relativistic effects of expanding spacetime?

This is a question I've been mulling over for a while and I'm hoping someone here can point me in the right direction. Sorry if it's a bit of a novice question. For the record, I don't fully know GR, ...
0
votes
2answers
48 views

Why does gravitational lensing bend light rather than absorbing it?

I've read that gravitational lensing bends the light; I am a little confused about black holes and why lensing produces different results. Black holes absorb light whereas lensing should have also ...
6
votes
2answers
198 views

Do gravitational waves cause time dilatation?

The effect of gravitational waves in transverse traceless gauge on matter is represented by the expansion and contraction of a ring of test particles in the direction of polarization of the wave. ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

2 Event Horizons come into contact [duplicate]

Just a question out of curiosity, what would happen if the event horizons of 2 black holes of the same mass were to come into contact? Would both gravitational accelerations be canceled where the ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

Mass of a black hole

I know that if a star collapses into a volume with radius less or equal to the Schwarzschild radius $r_s=\frac{2GM}{c^2}$ then a black hole is created and it has the same mass of the star that gave it ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

What is the energy of a black hole?

This might be a stupid question but given Einstein's general theory of relativity $E = m c^{2} $ what is the energy of a black hole? Isn't the mass of a black hole infinite? Wouldn't that be infinity ...
5
votes
2answers
221 views

What is the entropy of the universe today?

What's the entropy of the universe today? How does one go about calculating this? I've heard the statement that black holes account for the bulk of the entropy in the universe today, but don't know ...
10
votes
1answer
398 views

Can masses move in 2+1 gravity?

I would like to understand basic concepts of the general relativity in 2+1 spacetime. As far as I know, GR predicts that such a spacetime is flat everywhere except for the point masses which create ...
130
votes
13answers
9k views

How does gravity escape a black hole?

My understanding is that light can not escape from within a black hole (within the event horizon). I've also heard that information cannot propagate faster than the speed of light. It would seem to ...
6
votes
2answers
207 views

Is the flatness of space a measure of entropy?

This is a bit quirky: For a very long time I've found Stephen Hawking's evaporating small black holes a lot more reasonable and intuitive than large black holes. The main reason is that gravity is ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

'hypersurface orthogonal' component of covariant derivative of normal vector

I believe that answer to my question is rather trivial but I can't seem to get my head around it. In context of ADM formulation of gravity (or any other differential geometry context, I guess) the ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

What is the meaning of space-time curvature?

What is the difference between the Space-time curvature and Space curvature?
7
votes
2answers
225 views

Assuming that the Cosmological Principle is correct, does this imply that the universe possess an empirically privileged reference frame?

OK...before everyone blasts this with references to the relativistic invariance of the physical laws, time dilation, etc let me add some context. Also, I am an amateur with an interest in physics, so ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

What transformation is the metric of general relativity invariant under?

My limited understanding of metrics comes from Cartan. From there, I understand that a metric is something invariant under certain transformations, e.g. Lorentz in special relativity. But with the ...
2
votes
1answer
178 views

Using the area element in derivation of geodesic

In the derivation of the geodesic, one starts with the integral of the line element (arclength): $$L(C)=\int_{\tau_1}^{\tau_2}d\tau\sqrt{g_{\mu \nu}\dot{x}^{\mu} \dot{x}^{\nu}}$$ The integrand is ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Riemann curvature tensor in first order perturbation theory as a Lie derivative of Riemann curvature tensor in zero order

I am having a difficulty solving my homework so I was hoping I could get some help, so here it is. It is about gravitational waves and first order gravitational perturbation theory, I have to prove ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Gregory-Laflamme Instability

Certain solutions to the low energy effective action of string theory, namely black strings and branes, were shown to exhibit an instability via perturbation theory. Specifically, the metric is ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

Wouldn't angular momentum of a binary star system decrease?

Consider a binary star system, as these stars go around one another they would emit gravitational waves. Since, the graviton is a spin 2 particle. Wouldn't the angular momentum of the stars decrease? ...
20
votes
5answers
6k views

Why does GPS depend on relativity?

I am reading A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, and in it he mentions that without compensating for relativity, GPS devices would be out by miles. Why is this? (I am not sure which relativity ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How to find solutions to the gravitational potential metric h

I'm working on a problem in which a star of mass M1, radius R1 is surrounded by a shell of mass M2, , radius R2. I want to find the solutions to the gravitational potential h in the regions in between ...
8
votes
2answers
470 views

Black hole complementarity - absorption of Hawking radiation

I try to understand two principles formulated by Leonard Susskind in his book The Black Hole War: 1, To any observer who remains outside a black hole, the stretched horizon appears to be a hot layer ...
6
votes
4answers
115 views

What is difference between Inertial mass and gravitational mass [duplicate]

I recently read that the mass we deal with in Equation $F=Ma$ is called inertial mass and the mass we deal with in $F=Mg$ is gravitational mass. Suppose I am taking a same ball in a free fall and in ...
3
votes
1answer
264 views

Surface gravity of Kerr black hole

I'm going through Kerr metric, and following the 'Relativist's toolkit' derivation of the surface gravity, I've come to a part that I don't understand. Firstly, the metric is given by ...
0
votes
0answers
80 views

How come that an Infinite universe will collapse under gravity?

In this PSE post the issue is about the stability of an infinite universe under Newtonian gravity. Here I'will drop the Newtonian constraint because we know of the finite speed of interactions and I ...
-4
votes
0answers
37 views

what are wormholes made of and how do they function?

what are wormholes made of and how do they function ? Also, what is the relation between black holes and wormhole ?
3
votes
2answers
123 views

Cosmological constant doubts

I have read about cosmological constant given by einstein in universe in nutshell as well as in general and special relativity. But still I am not able to understand the aim to use it or to introduce ...
5
votes
1answer
484 views

warp drive with gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime

gravitational waves are strictly transversal (in the linear regime at least), also their amplitudes are tiny even for cosmic scale events like supernovas or binary black holes (at least far away, ...
1
vote
2answers
290 views

Does GR really allow superluminal movement?

In this video, Michio Kaku says "...general theory of relativity, where it is possible, we think, that you might be able to go faster than the speed of light..." Does GR really allow ...
6
votes
2answers
406 views

Why gravity is a spin-2 field? How can I read the spin from Einstein-Hilbert action?

I have often heard that the gravitational field has spin $2$. How can I read the spin of the field from the Einstein-Hilbert action $$S=\int \! \mathrm{d}^4x \,\sqrt{|g|} \, \mathcal{R} \, \, \, ?$$
10
votes
1answer
341 views

Causal and Global structure of Penrose Diagrams

What kind of global and causal structures does a Penrose diagram reveal? How do I see (using a Penrose diagram) that two different spacetimes have a similar global and causal structure? Also, I ...
1
vote
2answers
50 views

Would an Object Near a Pre-Blackhole Star Experience the Same Gravity as Post-Blackhole?

My question was inspired by this question, which got me thinking. According to Newton's Law of Gravitation, $$F = G\frac{m_1m_2}{r^2},$$ the gravity of an object is inversely proportional to the ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Can weakness of gravity explore new dimensions

Since gravitational force is weakest force out of the four fundamental fources at the microscopic level. Is it possible that gravitational force is strong in a particular direction at a new ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Minimal vs. Non-minimal coupling

What is the difference between Minimal vs. Non-minimal coupling in General Relativity? A brief introduction to Minimal Coupling in General Relativity could be useful too.
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Questions about MTW's _“thousand” tests of the Einstein principle_ (Box 16.4)

In Misner, Thorne, Wheeler (henceforth written as "MTW"), "Gravitation", Box 16.4, there's an experimental setup construction (or method) presented by which "Each geodesic clock is constructed and ...
4
votes
0answers
61 views

Why is the Ricci tensor diagonal for isotropic spacetime?

I'm reading Zee's Einstein Gravity in a Nutshell and while calculating the Ricci tensor for FRW spacetime he claims that because the spacelike slices of constant $t$ are rotationally invariant, the ...
4
votes
2answers
102 views

What is the notion of a spatial angle in general relativity?

Is there a notion of spatial angles in general relativity? Example: The world line of a photon is given by $x^{\mu}(\lambda)$. Suppose it flies into my lab where I have a mirror. I align the mirror ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

How to derive the schwarzchild metric?

I'm having trouble differentiating the following when making a change of co-ordinates to determine the Schwarzchild metric. $$r'^{2}=r^{2}C(r)$$ Then taking the total derivative of both sides, the ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

The Spin Connection

Why do we need to introduce the spin connection coefficients $\omega_{\mu \space \space b}^{\space \space a} $ in General Relativity? To me, they just look (mathematically) like the Christoffel ...