A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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How do objects even move due to gravity?

I am an newbie general relativistic learner and I learnt that gravity is bending of space-time and since objects move in straight-lines but since its curved they follow curved movement through space ...
3
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102 views

What are Killing spinors?

What are Killing spinors? How can they be motivated? Are they directly related to Killing vectors and Killing tensors and is there an overarching motivation for all three objects? Any answer is ...
2
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1answer
169 views

How does string theory describe classical gravity theory, and QFT? [closed]

I am learning string theory, as I understand, gravitons exist as modes in string excitations, and also other particles. It gave me this picture: a lot of strings fulling in the spacetime, excitations ...
2
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0answers
119 views

Equation regarding the Riemann tensor in the Cartan formalism [closed]

I have a problem verifying the following equation (in three dimensions) $$\epsilon_{abc} e^a\wedge R^{bc}=\sqrt{|g|}Rd^3 x$$ where $R$ is the Ricci scalar and $R^{bc}$ is the Ricci curvature ...
3
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0answers
120 views

Ricci curvature of embedded spacetime

If I am not mistaken, there is a theorem which states that every Riemannian manifold can be embedded in the $n$-dimensional Euclidean space for some large-enough $n$. Does it also hold for preudo-...
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4answers
521 views

Applications of the Linearized Einstein Field Equations (EFE)

Look up linearized Einstein field equations anywhere and the first thing you'll see will be a discussion of gravitational waves. Using the linearized EFE's is pretty handy when studying gravitational ...
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0answers
62 views

Gravity Concept Question [duplicate]

Thought experiment: Imagine the sun suddenly disappeared; lets say it some how transported to the edge of the observable universe.What will be the effects on the space-time? (1) What does General ...
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2answers
1k views

Is special relativity a special case of general relativity, qualitatively?

Since Einstein name his theory Special Relativity and General Relativity, there should be some expected relationship between them, particularly "Special Relativity" being a special case of the more ...
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1answer
174 views

Riemann curvature tensor notation in Wald

This question is entirely on tensorial notation in Wald's General Relativity. When specifying the properties of the Riemann tensor on pg39, he states: $R_{[abc]}^{\quad \ \ \ d} = 0$ and For the ...
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1answer
408 views

Graviton polarization in higher dimensions

It's not difficult to see that the graviton in $D$ spacetime dimensions has $(D-3)D/2$ polarizations. In $D=4$ there are two $\epsilon^{\pm}_{\mu\nu}$. What I find curious is that in $D=4$ I can ...
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84 views

Is the spacetime generated by isolated system always asymptotically flat?

I read a saying in wiki of asymptotically flat spacetime http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asymptotically_flat_spacetime "In general relativity, an asymptotically flat vacuum solution models the exterior ...
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1answer
206 views

Does there exist a mathematically rigorous formulation of curved Hilbert Space?

The Hamiltonian is traditionally defined as \begin{align} H_{\text{flat}} = U^{\dagger}DU \end{align} where $D$ is a diagonal matrix with real eigenvalues and $U^{\dagger}U=I$ are the unitary ...
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211 views

How does the kinetic energy of quarks contribute to the mass of macroscopic objects?

As we know, most of the mass of ordinary matter comes from the kinetic energy of quarks. This means kinetic energy of quarks contributes to the mass of any object. However take a look at this ...
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38 views

Does a moving star have a larger gravitational pull? [duplicate]

A moving star's relativistic mass is larger than its rest mass. Is its gravitational pull larger? What about its inertial mass? Does it have larger inertial mass, keeping in mind that inertial mass ...
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1answer
46 views

Does general relativity have an effect of the frequency of light? [closed]

if a lightbeam is fired from space to earth is it blueshifted? I heard this happens with special relativity but not sure if it happens with genreal relativity
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3answers
360 views

Why does time slow down the closer you are to a mass?

When ever i look this up all I get is sites saying how its because general relativity says "-" why does it do it though? it is because there is more motion near gravity than further away? Or is it ...
3
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2answers
213 views

Textbook on classical E&M in curved spacetime

Can anyone recommend a good reference for classical electrodynamics that goes over electrodynamics in curved spacetime that doesn't assume much knowledge of GR -- that is it builds up the tensor ...
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3answers
371 views

A Conceptual Problem With the Field Equations of General Relativity

I have two questions: Suppose that we have an amount of energy in the form of a perfect fluid in the right hand side of Einstein field equations (energy momentum tensor), this will lead to a ...
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0answers
49 views

Problem books like I.E. Irodov for advanced physics [duplicate]

I really enjoyed doing problems from Irodov while learning introductory physics. But I am not able to find a book like that for Graduate level physics. Can you suggest me a book which has good (and ...
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1answer
77 views

Gravity in spacetime

Can the effect of gravity in spacetime be thought of as if nearby particles have a tendency to "align" their four velocity direction? I.e. "to point in the same direction".
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2answers
203 views

Invariant interval and gravity

Gravity is inversely proportional to the distance between objects. Do we use Euclidean distance or the invariant interval for that distance? Using the invariant interval makes everything a bit more ...
2
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1answer
240 views

Einstein and the existence of Black Holes

I have seen some papers claiming that Einstein said there is no Black Hole in the real world, here is a phrase from Einstein himself, see this arXiv preprint: The basic result of study is the ...
6
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2answers
1k views

Speed of light in general relativity

My question has a few parts concerning the speed of light in general relativity. Firstly, time changes in response to gravity and speed. Therefore, as gravity effects time in an area of space, should ...
2
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1answer
175 views

Geodesic curvature and Weyl transformations

The geodesic curvature is given by $$k=\pm t^a n_b\nabla_a t^b,$$ where $t^a$ is a unit vector tangent to the boundary of the string worldsheet and $n_a$ is an outward vector orthogonal to $t^a$. I ...
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3answers
88 views

Quantum Scales and the Flatness of Space-time

I know that on the smallest scales, general relativity predicts that space-time is flat. But I've also read that space-time can be described as a sort of "quantum foam" for distances smaller than the ...
3
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1answer
177 views

Was the firewall paradox resolved?

For quite sometime there has been a claim that the firewall paradox has been resolved (via lasers). For instance, http://global.ofweek.com/news/Lasers-to-solve-the-black-hole-information-paradox-9867 ....
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2answers
728 views

Why doesn't gravity bend everything equally?

If gravity is the curvature of spacetime it should bend everything equally. To clarify my point I would like you to imagine two scenarios. Think of a bird flying in the storm while the wind is blowing ...
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1answer
283 views

General relativity: gauge fixing

In his lectures professor Hamber said that the metric tensor is not unique, just like the 4 vector potential is not unique for a unique field in electrodynamics. Since the metric tensor is symmetric, ...
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500 views

If a photon has no mass, how can it be attracted by the Sun?

I read that the photon doesn't have mass, but my teacher says that the photon has mass because the sun can attract it (like in the experiments to prove the theory of relativity). I think that there ...
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1answer
104 views

Do gravitational waves travel on geodesics in GR? If yes, why?

I think, the answer is probably yes, but it can be answered by somebody who knows GR much better than I do. In case of a positive answer, can we say that gravitational radiation will be bent around ...
3
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2answers
415 views

Which of these two textbook equations of geodesic deviation is correct?

My previous question Geodesic deviation on a 2-sphere - is this the right track? got shot down as “off topic”, so I'm having a second stab at it. Misner et al's Gravitation (p34) gives the geodesic ...
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0answers
176 views

Textbook disagreement on geodesic deviation on a 2-sphere

Apologies if I have this completely wrong (and for the general long-windedness). I've searched online but can't find anything helpful/relevant. I'm trying to use the geodesic equation $$\frac{D^{2}\...
1
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1answer
264 views

Junction conditions in GR including electromagnetism

I have recently learned about the Israel junction conditions in GR (as explained in for example Gravitation by MTW). I then tried to generalize it when including Electromagnetism, i.e. matching two ...
2
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0answers
258 views

What is the metric of Vaidya black-hole horizon?

The metric of a Vaidya black hole in outgoing/retarted null coordinates are $$ds^2=-\left(1-\frac{2m(u)}{r^2}\right)du^2-2dudr+r^2\Big(d\theta^2+\sin^2\theta d\phi^2 \Big)$$ The eveolving horizon ...
3
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2answers
199 views

Why do the space time get curved around a massive object?What problems do we face if we do not consider the space time to be curved? [closed]

As far as I have the knowledge of GTR that a mass bends the space time around it.But why does this bend occur?The example from real life that when a mass is placed on a net then the net bends but it ...
2
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1answer
534 views

Angular momentum, what is it, is it conserved, and how do we know?

Firstly, most definitions of angular momentum assume a point about which you define angular momentum. I realize that you can consider the angular momentum about any point, and have many angular ...
2
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0answers
98 views

If $S$ is a closed achronal set in a spacetime, any timelike curve starting at a point in $I^+[S]$ and ending at a point in $I^-[S]$ interset $S$?

Suppose $S$ is an achronal set in a spacetime $M$. And $S$ is closed. At the same time, any null geodesic of $M$ intersects $S$. Then, why does any timelike curve from $I^+[S]$ to $I^-[S]$ intersect $...
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0answers
171 views

Is there a general stress-energy tensor for vector fields?

I've been reading about scalar fields in the context of general relativity, and I found this page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress-energy_tensor#Scalar_field. It says that the stress-energy ...
1
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1answer
135 views

Christoffel symbol

For two nearby points in General Theory of Relativity. The change in the vector components when parallel transported is given by Now, since the parallel transport change must depend on the path ...
5
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1answer
363 views

Parallel Transport and covariant derivative

I have been trying to understand the notion of parallel transport and covariant derivative. I am unable to see why the change in a vector when it is parallel transported from one point to another ...
3
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2answers
247 views

Why does the second Weyl scalar describe electromagnetic radiation?

I've been reading about the null tetrad, the Weyl tensor, and the Newman-Penrose identities, and so I found out about the Weyl scalars. While the zeroth, first, third, and fourth scalars describe ...
1
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1answer
90 views

geodesic conjugate points

I was reading "Nature of space and time" by Penrose and Hawking, pg.13, If $\rho=\rho_0$ at $\nu=\nu_0$, then the RNP equation $\frac{d\rho}{d\nu} = \rho^2 + \sigma^{ij}\sigma_{ij} + \frac{1}...
3
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0answers
113 views

Calculation of Einstein Equation

I have a 3d system with Lagrangian $$e_3^{-1} L_3 = -\frac{1}{2} R_3 + \delta_{ab} \partial_\rho q^a \partial^\rho q^b + \frac{1}{2H} V(q)$$ From this I want to calculate the Einstein equation by ...
4
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0answers
348 views

Tricks for Computing Riemann Curvature Tensor with Levi-Civita connection

I am new to differential geometry, so far it seems to me that computing the Riemann tensor tends to be a rather tedious task, I wanted to know whether there are some tricks that I am missing. In ...
3
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3answers
527 views

Is it time or duration? [closed]

Taking this post: "Is there a proof of existence of time?", as a starting point. Therein was mentioned that there is confusion between: "time" and "flow of time". There was a comment (of mine) that ...
3
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2answers
161 views

How does the gravity well change as space expands? [duplicate]

How does the gravity well change as space expands? If we assume that the Earth's gravitational field curves flat space to create a gravity well then how does the gravity well change as space expands ...
3
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0answers
142 views

How can one explain gravitational time dilation in non-rotating bodies? [closed]

A clock on the surface of the Earth (assuming it does not rotate) will accumulate around 0.0219 seconds less than a distant observer over a period of one year (assuming the observer is using ...
2
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1answer
982 views

How exactly and WHY does matter affect space-time? [closed]

According to general relativity, inertial mass and gravitational mass are the same, and all accelerated reference frames (such as a uniformly rotating reference frame with its proper time dilation) ...
13
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3answers
992 views

Is “now” or “the present moment” properly defined in GR?

My question is about the extent to which "now" is defined in GR. In Minkowski spacetime, it's possible to define a "now" for an inertial observer by finding a spacelike 3-plane such that, in the ...
3
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1answer
193 views

The FRW universe is NOT asymptotically flat? Its mass?

The Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric in the comoving coordinates $(t,r,\theta,\varphi)$ which describes a homogeneous and isotropic universe is $$ ds^2\,= -dt^2+\frac{a(t)^2}{1-kr^2}\,dr^2 + a(...