A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

4
votes
2answers
135 views

Is any spacetime metric physically realizable?

Given a spacetime metric, you could work out a stress-energy tensor for each position that would result in that metric. I know building a wormhole requires negative energy densities, which are ...
2
votes
2answers
47 views

How and when are the relativistic corrections applied to GPS satellites?

It is known that there is a need to correct the onboard clocks to reduce the time difference from 38μs to 50ns. Where is relativity playing its role here? Why cant the clocks be simply synchronised ...
1
vote
2answers
608 views

If time stops for an object, does that object feel gravity?

As far as I understand The GTR, it is said that Mass bends space-time which causes gravity. So every Mass in this universe is flowing through space-time example earth is moving along with space-time ...
16
votes
0answers
514 views

Positivity of Total Gravitational Energy in GR

I read the following statement in the introduction to an article: Over the last 30 years, one of the greatest achievements in classical general relativity has certainly been the proof of the ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Distance and luminosity distance

In my cosmology lecture notes I read that a way to measure distances in cosmology is to use standard candles and the comparison between "absolute luminosity" of the candle and the apparent luminosity. ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Distance of closest approach

When deriving the gravitational bending angle of light, In this paper, the author introduced $R$ (the distance of closest approach), in equation ($7$), to solve the problem. My question: How is $R$ ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Does isotropy imply homogeneity?

This question comes from exercise 27.1 in Gravitation by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler. They required the following: Use elementary thought experiments to show that isotropy of the universe implies ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

Relativity… Twin paradox

Sorry, but I have another stupid question about relativity. In the twin paradox: Let's say the travelling twin went to Proxima Centauri and back at 0,99c. However, he did not slow down to stop on ...
23
votes
4answers
9k views

How does faster than light travel violate causality?

Let's say I have two planets that are one hundred thousand lightyears away from each other. I and my immortal friend on the other planet want to communicate, with a strong laser and a tachyon ...
23
votes
1answer
1k views

Is general relativity holonomic?

Is it meaningful to ask whether general relativity is holonomic or nonholonomic, and if so, which is it? If not, then does the question become meaningful if, rather than the full dynamics of the ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

What is the binding energy in General Relativity?

In general relativity, the potential energy is given by $$V(r)=\frac{h^{2}}{2r^{2}}\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)-\frac{M}{r}.$$ Solving $V^{\prime}(r)=0$, there are two points where circular orbits ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

Carroll's derivation of the geodesic equations [duplicate]

In Carroll's derivation of the geodesic equations (page 69, http://preposterousuniverse.com/grnotes/grnotes-three.pdf), he starts with ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

About spin 2, graviton, in the context of attractive force.

excerpt from Introduction to Black hole physics, Valeri P. Frolov and Andrei Zelnikov In this textbook, there is comment about spin of gravitons as follows For gravitating bodies the gravitational ...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

Explicit Variation of Gibbons-Hawking-York Boundary Term

Are there any references that present the explicit variation of the Hilbert-Einstein action plus the Hawking-Gibbons-York boundary term, and demonstrate the cancellation of the normal derivatives of ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

What is the null geodesic equation? [duplicate]

What is null geodesic equation for the static and spherically symmetric line element in $$ds^{2}=-K^{2}dt^{2}+\frac{dr^{2}}{K^{2}}+r^{2}(d\theta^{2}+\sin^{2}\theta{d\phi^{2}})$$ where ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

The null geodesic for given geodesic [duplicate]

What is null geodesic equation for the static and spherically symmetric line element in $$ds^{2}=-K^{2}dt^{2}+\frac{dr^{2}}{K^{2}}+r^{2}(d\theta^{2}+\sin^{2}\theta{d\phi^{2}})$$ where ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Relationship between gravitational time dilation and energy?

The rate that a stationary clock slows down near a massive object, relative to one far away, can be read off from the Schwartzschild metric: ...
7
votes
3answers
820 views

What is the radius of the event horizon?

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r~=~\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.\tag{1}$$ However, If we had the metric $$ds^2~=~−A(r,t)dt^2+\frac{dr^2}{B(r,t)}+r^2(dθ^2+\sin^2{θ}dϕ^2),\tag{2}$$ where ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

What is the metric of a constant electromagnetic (pure electric or pure magnetic) field?

For example, imagine a magnetic field $B_x$ directing in $\hat{x}$ direction filling all the space. What is its associated metric field? I can construct the electromagnetic stress-energy tensor for ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

If a point r lies in the boundary of the chronological future of another point p, why does the chronological future of r belong to that of p?

I am studying the global causality of the spacetime. Here, I come across a problem. Suppose a point $r\in \partial I^+(p)$. $I^+(p)$ is the chronological future of a different point $p$ in ...
9
votes
5answers
4k views

What experimental proof has been found of Einstein's theory?

As a casual science reader, I've always found the implications of relativity (inconsistent clocks after near-light-speed travel and various space-time paradoxes) to be confusing and magical-sounding. ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Tensor components multiplication vs. matrix multiplication [duplicate]

I'm teaching myself general relativity at the moment and I'm not sure I understand the difference between the product of tensor components and matrix multiplication. First of all, if $A$ is a $(2,0)$ ...
0
votes
2answers
57 views

How any trajectory can be linear?

From this article: An inertial coordinate system ought to be one in which free particles move in straight lines. But any trajectory may be stipulated to be rectilinear, and a coordinate system ...
1
vote
3answers
143 views

How to derive the Schwarzschild radius? [duplicate]

I know that the Schwarzschild radius is given by $$r=\frac{2GM}{c^{2}}.$$ but I never seen a derivation for this equation. 1- Does anyone know how to derive this equation from general relativity? ...
3
votes
1answer
115 views

All of Physics! [duplicate]

In several of Neil Turok's talks, he talks about this equation that encompasses all of physics. Here it is: How much of it is true? If it isn't, then is it possible to put all of our knowledge of ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Physical motivation for mathematically extending solutions to Einstein's equations

Sorry if this question gets a little long; I want to explain why I'm asking it. The usual Schwarzchild metric $$ds^2 = -\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right) dt^2 + \left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)^{-1} dr^2 + ...
29
votes
6answers
6k views

Total energy of the Universe

In popular science books and articles, I keep running into the claim that the total energy of the Universe is zero, "because the positive energy of matter is cancelled out by the negative energy of ...
1
vote
0answers
84 views

Geodetic effect and Frame dragging

Two gyroscopes pointing perpendicular to each other were housed inside Gravity Probe B which performed polar orbit around Earth to test Einstein's theory of relativity. As the probe is orbiting ...
3
votes
3answers
201 views

How does warped space actually look (visually)?

Recently, I was reading about space warping due to extreme gravity and at speeds approaching c, but in books, they always show space in 2D and depth to show space distortion. I was wondering how ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Invariance in general relativity, university in problems question

From Problem #5 here, Free falling particles' worldlines in General Relativity are geodesics of the spacetime, i.e the curves $x^\mu(\lambda)$ with tangent vector $u^\mu=dx^\mu/d\lambda$, such ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

The age of black holes

I have a very small understanding of space-time however I have been watching some interviews and reading articles featuring theoretical physicist Kip Thorne and I have a few questions that I hope can ...
1
vote
0answers
74 views

Will a black hole cause scattering of a gravity wave?

In my GR textbook, it states that gravity waves can undergo interference but not scattering. I am just starting the chapter on linearised gravity concepts (weak field approximation) and my apologies ...
3
votes
2answers
111 views

Calculation of Einstein tensor for weak gravitational field

I am studying A First Course in General Relativity (2nd Ed.) by Bernard Schutz. I have some difficulty in deriving Eq.(8.32) on P.193, the form of Einstein tensor for weak gravitational field, which ...
2
votes
0answers
49 views

Non-local gravitational energy tensor

The well-known derivation of the Landau-Lifshitz gravitational energy pseudotensor, relies on several requirements: 1) that it be constructed entirely from the metric tensor 2) that it be index ...
4
votes
4answers
366 views

“Center of a black hole is a time”

$\newcommand{\d}[1]{\mathrm{d} #1}$In one lecture (around 1:33:15) of the series of lectures "Theoretical Minimum" of Prof. Susskind he talks about black holes and the Schwarzschild metric: $$\d ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Human max speed in open space

Suppose you are an astronaut forgotten in the middle of nowhere, between our solar system and proxima centauri's. Now, you are out of fuel. I heard that with some kind of movements, someone in free ...
5
votes
3answers
334 views

Is there a natural (suitable) definition for functional derivative in Curved space time

If $$\delta S = \int \sqrt g F[\phi] \delta \phi\tag{1}$$ Then is it natural to define the functional derivative as follows, $$\frac{\delta S}{\delta \phi} = F[\phi].\tag{2}$$ In particular does ...
2
votes
1answer
149 views

Question about universe expansion

In general relativity, we cannot determine the global structure of the universe (since it is not flat), therefore all measurements and observations are only meaningful locally. In particular, we can ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

A classically charged point particle interacting with electromagnetism and gravity

Consider a classically charged point particle interacting with electromagnetism and gravity. The relevant dynamical variables are $\chi^\mu (\tau)$ of the particle, the electromangetic potential ...
4
votes
3answers
439 views

How much fuel is required for star travel considering relativistic time dilation?

John Rennie's Q&A How long would it take me to travel to a distant star? discusses about interstellar travel taking into consideration. There was a case that discussed about constant ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

What is a “local” lorentz transformation of vielbein? How does it transform?

I'm struggling with Anthony Zee's chapter on differential forms in Einstein Gravity in a Nutshell, page 600. He asks us to prove that $$\omega= \Lambda \omega' \Lambda^{-1} - (d\Lambda) \Lambda^{-1}$$ ...
8
votes
3answers
729 views

Surface gravity of Kerr black hole

I'm going through Kerr metric, and following the 'Relativist's toolkit' derivation of the surface gravity, I've come to a part that I don't understand. Firstly, the metric is given by ...
4
votes
4answers
258 views

Taking selfies while falling, would you be able to notice a horizon before hitting a singularity?

I am generally interested in the role of "pings"(0a) between participants (a.k.a. "signal roundtrips"(0b), as familiar for instance from Synge's "five point curvature detector") in the determination ...
32
votes
5answers
2k views

Why do we need coordinate-free descriptions?

I was reading a book on differential geometry in which it said that a problem early physicists such as Einstein faced was coordinates and they realized that physics does not obey man's coordinate ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Which is the corrispondent of the Lorentz's transformation in general relativity?

The Lorentz's transformations tell us how space and time change in a flat case? There are a more general and powerfull transformation for general relativity?
8
votes
3answers
737 views

Special Relativistic approximation to GR

Some time ago I was talking to a professor in college about some of the fundamental aspects and origin of General Relativity. I was surprised to learn, in fact, that a pretty good approximation to GR ...
8
votes
1answer
320 views

Cancelling special & general relativistic effects

We know that for a GPS we need to make a correction for both general and special relativity: general relativity predicts that clocks go slower in a higher gravitational field (the clock aboard a GPS ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Time flow difference for satellites [duplicate]

Clocks in satellites have to be adjusted due to the effects of relativity; but does time for satellites (GPS) flow slower, due to the relative motion, or faster, due to the weaker amount of ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

Gravitational potential in GR

In proving that the metric will play the role of gravitational potential, there is this chain of ideas: ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

The invariance vs constancy of the speed of light in vacuum

This is perhaps as much a question of semantics as of physics but it is something I have been thinking about recently and was wondering if anyone else had a perspective on this. Now, it could be that ...