A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
39 views

Does the rate of observable change within space-time change as time passes?

Mass seems to be one thing the effects the "relativeness of time". Assuming the big bang, if the universe had mass in one central location and the mass is moving away from a singular point it would ...
2
votes
1answer
122 views

Are all maximally symmetric spacetimes constant curvature spacetimes?

A $d$ dimensional maximally symmetric spacetime is a spacetime with the maximum allowed number of Killing vectors. This number is $\frac{d(d+1)}{2}$. Constant curvature spacetimes are spacetimes ...
1
vote
3answers
89 views

Covariant Derivative of Kronecker Delta

I am reading Carroll's book on GR right now, and I ran into a little trouble in his chapter 3 on curvature. He is establishing the properties of the covariant derivative, and claims that the fact that ...
-1
votes
0answers
21 views

Global Hyperbolicity IN SpaceTime

why space time which admits a Cauchy surface is called globally hyperbolic. I didn't actually understand what does globally hyperbolic physically means.
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Charge without charge and non-traversable wormholes

My question concerns the theory proposed in this classic paper by Misner and Wheeler. In the paper, the authors propose the idea of "charge without charge"--namely, that positive and negative ...
12
votes
4answers
1k views

Since there are gravitational lenses, are there gravitational mirrors?

Gravitational lensing is an observed phenomenon. Can one have a gravitational mirror? A slightly unrelated question: Can gravitational waves be reflected?
2
votes
2answers
146 views

Is there something similar to Gauss's Law For Gravity in General Relativity?

In Newtonian Physics there is an equation that for the Gravitational Flux of an object known as Gauss's Law For Gravity. Gauss's Law for Gravity describes the number of Gravitational Field Lines ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

How much Gravity is required to stop time?

Clocks free of gravitational influence run faster than those experiencing gravity. Is it possible for gravitational influence to bring time to a stop? Additionally can acceleration affect clocks in ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

Global Hyperbolicity in spacetime Manifold [closed]

If space time is timelike or null geodesically incomplete but cannot be embedded in a larger spacetime then we say that it has singularity. What does incompleteness means here?
10
votes
2answers
897 views

Orbits around the Photon sphere of a black hole (Schwarzschild coordinates)

This is a follow-up question to the answer given at What is the exact gravitational force between two masses including relativistic effects?. Unfortunately the author hasn't been online for a few ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

If we could perfectly control gravitational waves, could we play music with them? [closed]

Sound is just a kinetic wave propagating through a medium, right? In that case, if we had the ability to make gravitational waves exactly as we want them, could we play music to an observer some ...
2
votes
0answers
95 views

Two dimensional spacetime and the Gauss Bonnet theorem

Generally two dimensional spacetimes are deemed to be static, as the Gauss Bonnet theorem implies that the Einstein Hilbert action would be a constant independent of $g$. But as far as I can tell, ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Conserved quantity in a spacetime with Killing vector

I am trying to prove that that the expression $Q=-\frac{1}{\kappa}\int_{S_\infty} \nabla^i \xi^k \mathrm{d}\sigma_{ik}$ is a conserved quantity for a spacetime with Killing vector $\xi^i$ where $S_\...
5
votes
0answers
34 views

Israel-Wilson-Perjés Solutions

I'm searching for a reference that gives explicitly the field strength (or at least the gauge fields) of the Israel-Wilson-Perjés Solution, using complex harmonic functions for the metric. In "...
3
votes
0answers
84 views

Scalar Curvature of a Conformally Flat Metric

Suppose that you have a metric $g_{\mu\nu}=\phi^2\eta_{\mu\nu}$ for some function $\phi$. There is a standard formula for what the scalar curvature $R$ looks like in terms of $\phi$, which is given by ...
8
votes
2answers
149 views

Can the question of a gravitationally accelerated charge radiation be tested experimentally?

I know that the question of radiation from a gravitationally accelerated charge has been discussed extensively at Does a charged particle accelerating in a gravitational field radiate?. Yet the ...
5
votes
1answer
70 views

Coupling a spinor field to a preexisting scalar field?

So I'm not a physicist, but I'm thinking about a mathematical problem where I think physical insight might be useful. We're working on a Riemannian manifold $(M,g)$ (positive definite metric) with a ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Energy required to accelerate from different reference frames

So I've recently been studying relativity a lot trying to understand it and I feel like I grasp most things conceptually but I have one issue I've been trying to understand for the last couple days ...
2
votes
2answers
82 views

What is the difference between time and space in general relativity?

I know that similar questions have been asked before, I will try to be specific. In special relativity time is the coordinate with minus sign in metric tensor. In general relativity the components of ...
28
votes
5answers
3k views

Does a charged particle accelerating in a gravitational field radiate?

A charged particle undergoing an acceleration radiates photons. Let's consider a charge in a freely falling frame of reference. In such a frame, the local gravitational field is necessarily zero, ...
3
votes
2answers
259 views

The ADM Energy of Gravitational Waves?

I have been looking for books about this question for several days. However, almost all books use Landau–Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the energy of Gravitational Waves.And they said the result ...
6
votes
2answers
99 views

Will accelerated observer see radiation from the charge that is at rest in observers's frame?

So I had a huge debate about this with my friends. Imagine that you are in a non-inertial frame of reference. For simplicity, assume that frame is accelerated along x-axis. You have held a charge in ...
5
votes
1answer
260 views

Killing tensor and Riemann tensor identity

I know that if we have a Killing vector then it's straightforward to show the identity: $$\nabla_a \nabla_b K_c = R_{cba}^k K_d$$ I'm now trying to show the following identity for a $(0,2)$ Killing ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Are general coordinate transformations and diffeomorphisms the same? [duplicate]

Infinitesimal diffeomorphisms $x{}^\mu \rightarrow x{}^\mu + \xi{}^\mu$ (with $\xi{}^\mu \ll 1$) change geometric objects by means of the Lie derivative, that is, $X \rightarrow X + \mathcal{L}_\xi \, ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Coordinate time difference between emiting and detecting a photon in bent spacetime

Consider an arbitrary non-trivial metric $g_{ij}$ - like the Schwarzschild metric. Now, consider two observers $A$ and $B$, staying at fixed radii $R_A$ and $R_B$, respectively, with $R_A > R_B$. ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

How is gravitational time dilation different from time dilation due to differences in speed? [duplicate]

This is what I understand from what I've been reading online: In the derivation for the gravitational time dilation equation, $$t = t_0\sqrt{1-\frac{2GM}{rc^2}}$$ we use the special relativity ...
4
votes
1answer
235 views

Closed timelike curves in the spin-2 gravity formalism

Let's say we take some topologically trivial CTC spacetime, like the Gödel metric: $$ds^2 = -dt^2 - 2e^{\sqrt{2}\Omega y} dt dx - \frac{1}{2}e^{\sqrt{2}\Omega y} dx^2 + dy^2 + dz^2$$ And then I ...
6
votes
1answer
77 views

Conformal Gravity

Lubos, in his comment to a question, says that (http://physics.stackexchange.com/q/61281) First of all, one can't gauge a symmetry without modifying (enriching) the field contents. Gauging a ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Linearized Einstein equation on a general background metric

All of my texts only give the Linearized Einstein equation on the Minkowski background so I thought I'd try and figure it out by hand today. Using the standard perturbation $h_{\mu\nu}$ and denoting ...
2
votes
1answer
443 views

Linearized Einstein Equations

I've been trying to prove this equation: $$ \delta G_{\alpha\beta}=-\frac{1}{2}\left(\square\bar{h}_{\alpha\beta}+2R{}_{\gamma\alpha\delta\beta}\bar{h}^{\gamma\delta}\right)+\frac{1}{2}\left(\bar{h}_{\...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

Are the Schwarzschild metric and the Geodesic Equation relevant in the context of the Earth? [closed]

The geodesic equation used in general relativity is the following: $$ {\mathrm d^2 x^\mu \over \mathrm ds^2} =- \Gamma^\mu {}_{\alpha \beta}{\mathrm d x^\alpha \over\mathrm ds}{\mathrm d x^\beta \...
5
votes
1answer
70 views

Signature of $f: \Lambda^2(\mathbb{R}^4) \times \Lambda^2(\mathbb{R}^4) \to \mathbb{R}$, $f(\omega, \omega') = \omega \wedge \omega'$ [closed]

Define$$f: \Lambda^2(\mathbb{R}^4) \times \Lambda^2(\mathbb{R}^4) \to \Lambda^4(\mathbb{R}^4) \cong \mathbb{R}, \quad f(\omega, \omega') = \omega \wedge \omega'.$$ What is the signature of $f$? ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

Covariant derivative of a covariant derivative

I'm trying to find the covariant derivative of a covariant derivative, i.e. $\nabla_a (\nabla_b V_c)$. This is something I've taken for granted a lot in calculations, namely I though that by the ...
4
votes
0answers
39 views

Schwarzschild metric, speed of ball as measured by observer who catches the ball, just before ball is caught? [closed]

Inspired by this question here. The Schwarzschild metric, describing the exterior gravitational field of a planet of mass $M$ and radius $R$, is given by$$ds^2 = -(1 - 2M/r)\,dt^2 + (1 - 2M/r)^{-1}\,...
3
votes
0answers
35 views

Induced metric is a scalar for transformation from $x\to x'$? (Poisson E.A p.62)

I have a (simple) question about the induced metric $h_{ab}$. In Poisson E.A. (a relativist toolkit) it says in p. 62 that the induced metric $$h_{ab}=g_{{\alpha}{\beta}} \frac{\partial x^{\alpha}}{\...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

How conclusive is “Gravitational red-shift Gedanken”?

The gedanken goes as you take a particle of mass $m$ at a height $H$. Then let it fall to gain the velocity (approximately)$\sqrt{2gH}$ when it reaches the ground. Convert the particle into a photon ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

How do you actually use the geodesic equation?

The geodesic equation used in general relativity is the following: $$ {d^2 x^\mu \over ds^2} =- \Gamma^\mu {}_{\alpha \beta}{d x^\alpha \over ds}{d x^\beta \over ds}. $$ It states that the ...
8
votes
2answers
173 views

Do gravitational waves have entropy?

We know, according the current understanding of black holes and General Relativity, as well as quantum fields in General Relativity, that black holes have an entropy proportional to the area of the ...
2
votes
2answers
37 views

Is it possible to express “free”-ness of a time-like world line without referring to “tangent space” (but only directly to causal relations )?

I don't know much about tangent spaces, or tangent vectors, "as such"; nor about affine parametrization (which seems to be closely related to the notion of tangent vectors, as far as I understand for ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Are the quasinormal modes scalar quantities?

I am studying the so-called quasinormal modes (QNMs) in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence and I got stuck. For instance, if I choose a weird patch of coordinates for the, say, AdS5-...
7
votes
3answers
641 views

How to show that every Killing vector field is a matter collineation?

Various texts make this claim, but no proof is given. Explicitly, let $L$ denote the Lie derivative. Suppose $L_X g_{ab} = 0$ for some vector field $X$, called a Killing vector field. Suppose that ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Why is the Einstein Static Universe represented as an infinite cylinder when it seems like only half a cylinder?

The Einstein static universe metric is $$ds^2=-dt^2 + d\chi^2 + \sin(\chi)^2d\Omega^2$$ where $-\infty<t<\infty$ , $0<\chi<\pi$ and $d\Omega^2$ is the metric on a $S^2$. It describes the ...
6
votes
3answers
122 views

Two Robertson-Walker observers, at what time will a light signal be received?

Here is a question I have that is inspired by this question here. The spacetime metric of a radiation-filled, spatially flat ($k = 0$) Robertson-Walker universe is given by$$ds^2 = - dT^2 + T[dx^2 + ...
6
votes
1answer
302 views

Null geodesics in uniform gravitational field metric

I'm trying to understand the null geodesics in the metric: $$\mathrm{d}s^2 = -(1+gz)^2 \mathrm{d}t^2 + \mathrm{d}z^2 + \mathrm{d}x^2$$ In particular I'm wondering if the following intuition is valid:...
1
vote
2answers
102 views

Flat space Solution of Einstein Field Equation

Does a trace-free energy-momentum tensor $T_{\mu}^{\mu} = 0$ ensure that the Einstein's field equations have a flat space solution?
16
votes
2answers
931 views

How does one measure space-like geodesics? Or: What is the physical interpretation of space-like geodesics?

In general relativity, time-like geodesics are the trajectories of free-falling test particles, parametrized by proper time. Thus, they are easy to interpret in physical terms and are easy to measure (...
4
votes
2answers
138 views

$C^\infty$, nonvanishing parallel vector field along geodesic, orthogonal to tangent

The following question(s) showed up in my admittedly basic undergraduate research in general relativity/cosmology, and I was wondering if anybody could me with it. Let $(X, g)$ be a $n$-dimensional ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Two Black Holes held stationary by EM forces

If two black holes with large enough mass (so that the tidal forces are minimal and the intersection is large) that are held apart by like charges (saddle point stability). Imagine the black holes in ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Torsion in kerr black holes

In General Relativity, we generally assume that the derivative operator is torsion-free, i.e., second covariant derivatives commute on functions. However, in Kerr black holes, spacetime is dragged (...