A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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How Smooth is an Event Horizon?

For a non-rotating Black Hole, the event horizon can be described by the Schwarzschild metric as a sphere. Assuming external observer, away from the Black Hole and also assuming that there is no ...
6
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2answers
364 views

Interpreting the Kretschmann scalar

How do you interpret the Kretschmann scalar (in general relativity)? What can you tell from it? The Kretschmann scalar is defined as $$K = R_{abcd} R^{abcd} $$ where $R_{abcd}$ is the Riemann ...
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0answers
47 views

What is the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic curvature? [migrated]

In general relativity, energy bends spacetime. However, this doesn't mean that a fifth dimension for spacetime to "bend into" exists." That is, spacetime isn't embedded in a higher dimensional space, ...
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3answers
706 views

Noether's theorem in general relativity

Noether's theorem yields a conservation law for every symmetry. Is that independent of the Lagrangian i.e. when $\mathcal{L}\neq T-V$? In general relativity the integral that is minimised will be the ...
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0answers
101 views

Intuition behind deriving the FRW metric

I am studying the FRW metric and am looking at a motivation for it here. The motivation seems to use four spatial dimensions. Why do we need the fourth spatial dimension in this? This doesn't seem ...
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1answer
49 views

Maximum Angular Momentum for an orbit in GR

[The reference for this question is the book Gravitation by Misner,Thorne, & Wheeler.] The trajectories of massive particles around a spherically symmetric body is governed by the effective ...
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3answers
772 views

Why does weak equivalence principle say gravity is equivalent to acceleration?

I am told that the weak equivalent principle, that $m_i=m_g$ (inertial and gravitational masses are equivalent) is equivalent to the statement that in a small system you can't tell whether you are in ...
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5answers
2k views

Does curved spacetime change the volume of the space?

Mass (which can here be considered equivalent to energy) curves spacetime, so a body with mass makes the spacetime around it curved. But we live in 3 spatial dimensions, so this curving could only be ...
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3answers
176 views

Do gravitational waves propagate backwards in time?

Gravitational waves are spacetime waves, which stretch and squeeze both space and time. Since relativity puts space and time (almost) on an equal footing, it seems to me that since gravitational waves ...
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0answers
28 views

How To Arrive At Ground State Metric of Kaluza-Klein Theory

The ground state metric, after an extra dimension of space is compactified (to a circle) in Einsteinian gravity, is the metric which corresponds to the R_4 × S_1 geometry of the separated dimensions. ...
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4answers
7k views

What is the physical meaning of the affine parameter for null geodesic?

For time-like geodesic, the affine parameter is the proper time $\tau$ or its linear transform, and the geodesic equation is $$\frac{\mathrm d^{2}x^{\mu}}{\mathrm d\tau^{2}}+\Gamma_{\rho\sigma}^{\mu}...
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2answers
272 views

The ADM Energy of Gravitational Waves?

I have been looking for books about this question for several days. However, almost all books use Landau–Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the energy of Gravitational Waves.And they said the result ...
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1answer
116 views

Why gravitational waves are not produced by objects moving at constant velocity?

Gravitational wave is produced by change in gravitational field, source. If something is moving away from me at constant speed, its gravitational field will vary. But why only accelerating bodies ...
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1answer
50 views

Confirmation of a concept under General Relativity and Frames of Reference

I would like to preface this by saying that this isn't necessarily meant to be a full question, though it may become that, but it rather a confirmation of my understanding of a concept. Newton would ...
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0answers
31 views

What is the minimum math level required to comprehend general relativity? [duplicate]

I am currently working on a B.S. In chemistry and only need to go up to Calculus II, though I like to dabble in physics. What other math classes could I take to gain greater understanding of higher ...
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0answers
54 views

Kerr Metric and Asymptotically Static Frame

Suppose we are given a Kerr spacetime (e.g. containing a single uncharged rotating black hole). How does one know that the coordinates chosen is rotating or non-rotating as seen from infinity? And how ...
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1answer
55 views

How do gravitational waves transfer momentum?

In Electromagnetism I understand it in terms of the Lorentz force: the E-component of the field causes the charge to respond infinitesimally with a $\vec{v}$ in the E-direction such that the $\vec{v}\...
4
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1answer
247 views

Closed timelike curves in the spin-2 gravity formalism

Let's say we take some topologically trivial CTC spacetime, like the Gödel metric: $$ds^2 = -dt^2 - 2e^{\sqrt{2}\Omega y} dt dx - \frac{1}{2}e^{\sqrt{2}\Omega y} dx^2 + dy^2 + dz^2$$ And then I ...
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1answer
69 views

Is the age of the Universe relative to where you are within it? [duplicate]

The accepted age of the Universe is 13 billion years give or take. If you were a super space being and hypothetically had spent a large portion of this time sitting next to a black hole then your ...
2
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2answers
82 views

Projection of a tensor

Consider the following tensor (abstract index notation, e.g. Wald's) $B_{ab}$ and timelike vector field $X^{a}$ such that $X^aX_a=-1$ and \begin{equation} B_{ab}=\nabla_bX_a \end{equation} Then one ...
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2answers
88 views

General relativity applications other than gravity

Do the Einstein field equations successfully predict/describe physical processes other than gravitational ones?
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2answers
932 views

Is Earth's orbit around the Sun affected by the ~8 minutes light delay?

Gravitational change occurs at the speed of light. As a consequence, we experience on Earth the gravitational attraction of the Sun based on its position relative to us ~8 minutes ago. How does this ...
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3answers
602 views

General relativity vs graviton discovery

Will the discovery of the graviton lead to the redundancy of general relativity even though it has been so well established. If not, will it mean that gravity will have two separate theories that ...
26
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3answers
959 views

Do intergalactic magnetic fields imply an Open Universe?

According to a paper on the arXiv (now published in Phys Rev D), they do. How credible is this result? The abstract says: The detection of magnetic fields at high redshifts, and in empty ...
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0answers
93 views

(1+1)-General Relativity

Goodevening everyone, my question is: What is the interest of studying the (1+1)dimension General Relativity? Can you explain please? Thank's in advance!
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0answers
30 views

Can orbiting a black hole 99.99% speed of light make other object with relatively fast clock travel faster than light, relative to me?

If i orbit a black hole, 99.9% speed of light, time for me is moving slowly, relative to me, planet earth is aging fast, and i have traveled 10 years into the future(relatively) in 1 second, suppose ...
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26 views

How small can a sample size be of space to detect space-time curvature?

What is the minimal sample size of space necessary to detect space-time curvature?
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1answer
95 views

Metric with Harmonic Coefficient and Stress-Energy Tensor in General Relativity

I have two question: Is there any possible implies or interest to use in general relativity a metric whose coefficients are harmonic functions? What is the meaning (physical) if the stress-energy ...
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1answer
62 views

Black hole gravity at bottom (deepest end) [closed]

If black holes are hole in space and time then at bottom or below bottom there is no more gravity of black hole. As any hole has an end (Deepest end). Is this true ? ******** EDIT *********** http:/...
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0answers
53 views

Does gravitational radiation have a formalism similar to Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics?

Binary systems radiate energy away in gravitational waves as the orbits of the two masses spiral in towards each other. My understanding of gravity is that we think of it as a mediator of particle-...
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5answers
578 views

Where does the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime really come from?

I have been searching for quite a while but mostly found the answer: Einstein's genius. Quite unsatisfactory. I know and understand that the idea gravity=curvature of spacetime works. Furthermore I ...
5
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2answers
144 views

What does string theory predict for the singularity inside a black hole?

The usual explanation for what's going on inside a black hole goes something like "General Relativity predicts a singularity with infinite curvature, but when matters gets so tightly compressed we ...
8
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1answer
231 views

Homotopy proof of the lack of foliation of the Gödel metric

A common proof of the lack of foliation of the Gödel universe, apparently mostly copy pasted from Hawking and Ellis, goes thusly : A closed timelike curve must cross a spacelike hypersurface ...
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41 views

Lagrangian density

I really wonder : Why do we take Lagrangian density as zero for the Stokes theorem in Minkowski-space at infinity? Is there a proof of this situation?
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103 views

Deriving the field equations for a dark energy / modified gravity effective field theory

Question I'm trying to derive the modified gravity EFT field equations and, from their 00 component, this Friedmann equation: \begin{equation} H^{2}+H\frac{\dot{\Omega}}{\Omega}=\frac{\kappa \rho_{m}+...
3
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1answer
84 views

Exotic differentiable structures in physics

When reading a bit on exotic spheres and exotic $\mathbb{R}^4$'s, I came across some papers of Carl H. Brans and Torsten Asselmeyer-Maluga: "Exotic differentiable structures and general relativity" (...
4
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1answer
225 views

Is the new Hawking black hole all about photon launch angles?

The new Jan 2014 Hawking paper (arXiv:1401.5761v1) asserts on page 3: The absence of event horizons means that there are no black holes - in the sense of regimes from which light can't escape to ...
4
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1answer
97 views

Is it possible to push together two charged particles of the same charge hard enough so it becomes a black hole?

My chain of thought is the following: To push together two charges of the same sign you need to do work. The energy spent will be turned into electrostatic potential energy. Can we pump so much ...
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3answers
374 views

How close can two extremal black holes with the same charge can get?

Here's a puzzle I have been pondering over. If we have two extremal black holes with the same charge, the electrostatic repulsion between them ought to cancel the gravitational attraction between ...
8
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2answers
88 views

Two charged black holes in equilibrium

Consider a pair of (possibly rotating) charged black holes with masses m1, m2 and like charges q1, q2. It seems that under certain conditions gravitational attraction should exactly cancel ...
26
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1answer
712 views

Overcharging a black hole

Hubeny's 1998 paper got a lot of people interested in determining whether cosmic censorship can be violated by dropping too much charge onto a black hole. It suggested that you might be able to get a ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Does the size of a black hole change depending on its charge or spin?

I was talking to this friend of mine who said that the size of a black hole could vary depending on its "charge" and spin. He said the size of a black hole would reduce if it had a spin or charge. The ...
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2answers
116 views

Pumping charged particles (of same charge) into a blackhole

Would would happen if you started pumping charged particles of same charge into a black hole? Let's assume that you have an infinite number of those charged particles. What will happen to the event ...
27
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4answers
1k views

If I fall into an evaporating black hole, where do I end up?

This question has been bothering me for a while. I have a crude hypothesis... As I understand it, an observer falling into a black hole will cross the event horizon at some specific future (proper) ...
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2answers
2k views

What is black hole spin?

First of, congrats to the people at LIGO. In this article, the BBC notes that the latest LIGO results show that a new black hole was formed with a spin of $0.2$ (dimensionless number). What exactly ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Age of universe from Hubble's constant

Assume the Robertson-Walker metric: $$g = -d\tau^2 + a^2(\tau)\gamma$$ where $\gamma$ is the flat, spherical or hyperbolic spatial metric and $a$ is the scale factor. Wald seems to calculate the age ...
5
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2answers
690 views

What is the equation for the scale factor of the universe, a(t), for the best fit of data to the $\Lambda CDM$ Model of Cosmology?

Ideally I like a single formula or multiple formulas for different time ranges that would cover the time from the end of inflation through 100+ billion years after the big bang using the $\Lambda CDM$...
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0answers
33 views

How to find tetrads corresponding to a given metric?

In General Relativity, sometimes doing calculations with a set of orthonormal tetrads $h^{a}_{\mu}$ where $h^{a}_{\mu}$$h^{b}_{\nu}$$\eta_{ab}=g_{\mu\nu}$ for some metric $g_{\mu\nu}$ is easier ...
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1answer
128 views

What is the relation between the metric tensor and the graviton?

In Zee's quantum theory in a nutshell, at the end of chapter I.10, he states that the graviton is of course the particle associated with the field $g_{\mu\nu}$. My understanding of quantum ...
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2answers
412 views

Wave packet in curved spacetime

It is known that the classical equation of motion for a scalar field wave packet on a curved spacetime background gives the geodesic trajectory (the e.o.m. is $(\nabla_\mu \nabla^\mu + m^2) \Phi=0$). ...