A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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Why can apparent horizon be computed based on its local geometry?

Why can apparent horizon be computed based on its local geometry? In the paper titled Black Holes, Geometric Flows, and the Penrose Inequality in General Relativity by Hubert L. Bray, has been ...
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1answer
126 views

Physical meaning of the Rindler hyperbola vertex and the Rindler lines

Two questions regarding the Rindler diagram: 1) Does the vertex of a given hyperbola in the diagram have physical meaning? I know it is the inverse of the constant proper acceleration ($\alpha$) ...
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4answers
869 views

General relativity in terms of differential forms

Is there a formulation of general relativity in terms of differential forms instead of tensors with indexs and subindexs? If yes, where can I find it and what are the advantages of each method? If ...
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77 views

gravitational field as a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance [closed]

can someone help me prove that a gravitational field corresponds to a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance. i know about the tensor formulation of GTR and the gauge invariance in electrodynamics ...
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1answer
80 views

Will a space traveller slow down due to space expansion?

Photons of relic radiation loose their energy as they propagate through space. Will a space traveler loose their peculiar velocity as he travels through vast distances? Will he stop somewhere or still ...
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2answers
3k views

maximum rotational speed

I am wondering if there is a limit to rotational speed of an object just like there is one for translation speed ? what are the implications of general relativity for rotating objects ?
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1answer
337 views

Pauli-Fierz “massive” equation and linearized gravity

It it known that the massive spin-2 irreducible representation of the Poincare group is the traceless symmetrical transverse 4-tensor $h_{\mu \nu}$ with rank 2: $$ (\partial^{2} + m^{2})h_{\mu \nu} = ...
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451 views

In the static spacetime, the extrinsic curvature of hypersurface $t=constant$ is zero

How can I prove that in the static spacetime, the extrinsic curvature of hypersurface $t=constant$ is zero? My efforts all are failed. Any hint would be greatly appreciated.
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2answers
105 views

What does this summation mean in relativity?

Equation 1.2 of 't Hooft's Introduction to General Relativity gives the Lorentz transformations: $$ (x^\mu)' = \sum\limits_{\nu = 1}^4 {L^\mu}_\nu x^\nu $$ Is this the sum of four square matrices ...
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64 views

What is the “momentum” referred to in the energy-momentum tensor

What is the "momentum" referred to in the energy momentum tensor from GR? Is it $m\dot{x}$ or is it the canonical momentum $\frac{d}{dt} \left(\frac{\partial L}{\partial \dot{x}}\right)$ Also, I ...
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503 views

Deriving Gauss-Bonnet Gravity (Or just higher order corrections)

I have been working for some time now on deriving the equations of motion (EOM) for the Gauss-Bonnet Gravity, which is given by the action: $$\int d^D x \sqrt{|g|} ...
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1answer
151 views

Are there any good references on the “gravitational” curvature of spacetime of a moving mass being distorted due to special relativity?

In this Wikipedia paragraph suggesting an explanation for the phenomenon of inertia, it claims: Another physicist, Vern Smalley, has derived the Lorentz transformation for mass by assuming that ...
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Are orbits reversible in general relativity?

It seems if I reverse velocities then things begin orbiting backwards, at least in classical mechanics. From here: Every orbit and trajectory outside atmospheres is in principle reversible, i.e., ...
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Newtonian gravity vs. general relativity: exactly how wrong is Newton?

Is there a simple function I can use to describe the difference between simple Newtonian dynamics and the actual observed motion? Or maybe some ratios for common examples of, say, the motion of stars ...
3
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1answer
115 views

Warped AdS geometry

I am having difficulty of finding more basic information on warped geometries. All the standard textbooks are not covering it. In the wiki article it's only said that warped geometry is the one which ...
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56 views

General relativity and global aspects [duplicate]

The theory of general relativity tells me something about the global structure of space-time, eg simply connected ?
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1answer
162 views

Extent of coordinate freedom to set metric components along a spacetime path

If we describe spacetime with a Lorentzian manifold, it is always possible to choose a coordinate system such that at any particular point $x^\alpha$, the components of the metric are: $$ ...
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92 views

how affine connection follows from Two derivative operator

IN wald's GR book in chapter 3 This is stated behind the definition of affine connection : First He showed that if we have two derivative operator $\nabla_a , \tilde\nabla_a$ (both of which ...
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1answer
136 views

Field action of linearized gravity associated with spin-2 particle in Thorne book

In MTW book there is one exercise in which there was proposed to discuss linearized tensor gravity, which is represented as $$ g_{\mu \nu} = \eta_{\mu \nu} + h_{\mu \nu}, \quad \eta_{\mu \nu} = ...
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2answers
468 views

The geodesic line on Poincare half plane

I was calculating the geodesic lines on Poincare half plane but I found I somehow missed a parameter. It would be really helpful if someone could help me find out where my mistake is. My calculation ...
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1answer
355 views

What does “all future lies within the event horizon” mean?

I was trying to find an answer as to why light does not escape black holes and I stumbled upon this Phys.SE question. In the answer it said that: "Since all future lies within the event horizon, ...
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1answer
78 views

Energy difference in General Relativity

Why exactly are absolute energies important in General Relativity, unlike for example EM where only energy differences matter?
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3answers
178 views

Can General Relativity Metric Tensor be independent of a particular co-ordinate index in a local area?

For example in a particular local area, can the metric tensor be totally independent of $z$ co-ordinate in $(t,x,y,z)$ co-ordinate system? This way the distance function will not contain $z$ ...
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2answers
773 views

About the standard derivation of the gravitational redshift

The objective is to derive the gravitational redshift ONLY from the Einstein's equivalence principle (E.E.P.), without using the whole theory of Relativity. This is the standard "informal" derivation ...
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1answer
156 views

How to prove that zero Weyl tensor predicts no deflection of light?

There is Nordstrom theory, which can be given as $$ C_{\mu \nu \alpha \beta} = 0. $$ The solution of Einstein equations for this case is conformally flat metric: $$ g^{\mu \nu} = e^{\epsilon \varphi ...
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2answers
183 views

I need help understanding a step in the derivation of the Schwarzschild solution

I am looking at Wikipedia's article on deriving the Schwarzschild solution. In the section "Simplifying the components", it says, On the hypersurfaces of constant $t$ and constant $r$, it is ...
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143 views

Calculating Forces via Feynman diagrams?

How would one go about calculating forces that test objects feel using Feynman diagram methods? For example, say we have a massive object in GR so that the metric takes on the standard ...
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2answers
385 views

Metric Expansion Of Space

I just do not understand this concept of metric expansion of space. Shouldn't the galaxies move away from each other. How can the space between them expand if the galaxies are not moving away from ...
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55 views

Will accelerating a massive particle generates a blackhole? [duplicate]

I have a naive question about blackhole. If I accelerate a massive particle very close to the speed of light, the particle will have large energy-momentum tensor. Will it become a blackhole?
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84 views

4 of Einstein equations without 2nd order time derivative

This question is related to my previous one and it was a homework problem and was due two weeks ago. Problem:prove that four of Einsteins' equations $$ G_{0\nu} = 8\pi T_{0\nu} $$ have to 2nd order ...
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1answer
164 views

Specify the Stress Energy Tensor and Calculate the Curvature

I have a simple question about general relativity and the Einstein field equations, I wonder if you can specify the stress energy tensor, i.e. specify some mass distribution in space and then ...
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1answer
96 views

causal sketches [closed]

I don't have much of an idea of how to draw causal sketches. I know that you need to work out the gradient of the light cones, which can be done using a given metric and using null vectors. But how do ...
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1answer
94 views

What is *uplift* in respect to extra dimensions and their stability?

What is uplift in respect to extra dimensions and their stability? It's notoriously hard to find something on this, as all possible keyword combinations pull up plethora of unrelated Google hits.
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2answers
879 views

How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...
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1answer
120 views

Best way to check for anisotropy given a metric tensor

Carroll gives the definition of isotropy at a point as given vector $V$ and $W$ in $T_{p}M$, there is some isometry that can push $V$ forward such that it ends up parallel to $W$. I understand what ...
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44 views

Allowed transformations in General Relativity [duplicate]

So in Special Relativity we have: $$ \Lambda \eta \Lambda^T=\eta $$ Is there an analagous formula for the metric in General Relativity?
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1answer
337 views

Riemann curvature tensor symmetries confusion

In the context of spacetime, reading Schutz, I'm confused about the symmetries of the Riemann curvature tensor, which I understand are: ...
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5answers
8k views

A list of inconveniences between quantum mechanics and (general) relativity?

It is well known that quantum mechanics and (general) relativity do not fit well. I am wondering whether it is possible to make a list of contradictions or problems between them? E.g. relativity ...
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63 views

Hubble's law for the Kasner solution

I'm puzzled with the following question: find an analog of the Hubble's law for the Kasner solution. Kasner metric is a solution to the vacuum Einstein equations ...
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0answers
90 views

Relativistic Black Hole? [duplicate]

So recently, looking at high energy particles through the lens of General and Special Relativity has peaked my interest. One thing I was considering, using the electron as the first example, is as ...
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1answer
85 views

Is there a minimum mass is required for light to be noticeably bent?

The sun bends the trajectory of light slightly. And a black hole will bend the trajectory entirely. This is all dependent on the proximity to the source of gravity. For a given angle, is there some ...
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1answer
272 views

Einstein action and the second derivatives

I have naive question about Einstein action for field-free case: $$ S = -\frac{1}{16 \pi G}\int \sqrt{-g} d^{4}x g^{\mu \nu}R_{\mu \nu}. $$ It contains the second derivatives of metric. When we want ...
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3answers
890 views

Can we apply Schrodinger equation in Newton Gravitational potential and derive the deterministic Newton's gravitation as a special case of it

We know the solutions for wave functions of a an hydrogen atom, and the energy values as given by spectral analysis of radiation emitted by Hydrogen, confirms the possible energy states as predicted ...
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0answers
155 views

How do we derive force/acceleration vectors from Einstein's field equations?

I'm new here and I don't have any formal experience in physics beyond A-level. I've been exploring an idea for a space sim game someone else is developing in which propulsion of a spacecraft is ...
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1answer
181 views

Does gravitational lensing violate Fermat's Principle that light must travel in straight lines?

Does bending of light due to warping of space violate Fermat's Principle or is it that in the principle light goes in a straight line with respect to space (taking space as the reference) and in ...
5
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1answer
418 views

6 independent Einstein field equations?

I can't understand the comment on page 409, Gravitation, by Misner, Thorne, Wheeler It follows that the ten components $G_{\alpha\beta} =8\pi T_{\alpha\beta}$ of the field equation must not ...
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3answers
162 views

Is light slower when traveling inside a gravity field?

This question is not about phase velocity changed which causes refraction, but about the real time itself being slower by the gravity of any object (from general relativity). If so, would this mean ...
8
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1answer
696 views

Quantization of Gravitational Field: Quantization conditions

I'm begining to study Quantization of field with the second quantization formalism. I've studied phononic field, electromagnetic field in the vacuum and a generic relativistical scalar field. I ...
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2answers
190 views

Proof that higher genus surface admits a metric of negative Ricci scalar everywhere

In the Green, Schwarz and Witten Superstring Theory textbook, the paragraph below equation 3.3.15 says, For genus greater than one, it can be shown that the surface admits a metric of everywhere ...
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How does one measure space-like geodesics? Or: What is the physical interpretation of space-like geodesics?

In general relativity, time-like geodesics are the trajectories of free-falling test particles, parametrized by proper time. Thus, they are easy to interpret in physical terms and are easy to measure ...