A theory that describes how matter produces and responds to the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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Where 2 comes from in formula for Schwarzschild radius?

In general theory of relativity I've seen several times this factor: $$(1-\frac{2GM}{rc^2}),$$ e.g. in the Schwarzschild metric for a black hole, but I still don't know in this factor where 2 comes ...
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2answers
186 views

Relativity - time dilation

I'm learning about relativity and I'm having some issues with it and the twin paradox. I found many questions and answers on this subject but they did not answer my specific problem. In my thought ...
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1answer
386 views

How to calculate temperature and entropy on Schwarzschild-de Sitter space

The cosmological event horizon found in a de Sitter universe has some interesting similarities to that of a black hole. For example, since we can find a temperature at the horizon, we are able to use ...
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1answer
1k views

Covariant derivative and Leibniz rule

I read the Wikipedia page about the covariant derivative, my main problem is in this part: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covariant_derivative#Coordinate_description Some of the formulas seem to lead ...
3
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1answer
849 views

Time dilation - why the observers see each other the slow one but then one of them is older or younger?

I'm in trouble with time dilation: Suppose that there's two people on the Earth (A,B), they are twins and each other has a clock. (So they are at the same reference frame). B travels in a spaceship ...
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1answer
128 views

What is the physical intepretation of harmonic coordinates?

When I see harmonic coordinates used somewhere, what should my association be? Is there some general use or need to consider the harmonic cooridnate condition? I don't really see what's ...
3
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0answers
93 views

are pinch-off bubbles valid solutions to general relativity?

are bubbles of spacetime pinching-off allowed solutions to general relativity? With "pinch-off bubble" i really mean a finite 3D volume of space whose 2D boundary decreases until it reaches zero and ...
5
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1answer
253 views

Confused about indices of the Ricci tensor

In an intro to GR book the Ricci tensor is given as: $$R_{\mu\nu}=\partial_{\lambda}\Gamma_{\mu \nu}^{\lambda}-\Gamma_{\lambda \sigma}^{\lambda}\Gamma_{\mu \nu}^{\sigma}-[\partial_{\nu}\Gamma_{\mu ...
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2answers
472 views

Falling into a black hole

I've heard it mentioned many times that "nothing special" happens for an infalling observer who crosses the event horizon of a black hole, but I've never been completely satisfied with that statement. ...
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1answer
241 views

What is the generalization, if any, of the weak and dominant energy conditions to SUGRA?

In standard general relativity, we have the null energy condition, the weak energy condition related to stability, and the dominant energy condition related to forbidding superluminal causal ...
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3answers
221 views

Having trouble seeing the similarity between these two energy-momentum tensors

Leonard Suskind gives the following formulation of the energy-momentum tensor in his Stanford lectures on GR (#10, I believe): $$T_{\mu \nu}=\partial_{\mu}\phi \partial_{\nu}\phi-\frac{1}{2}g_{\mu ...
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4answers
1k views

Can general relativity be completely described as a field in a flat space?

Can general relativity be completely described as a field in a flat space? Can it be done already now or requires advances in quantum gravity?
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0answers
54 views

Emitting gravitational radiation

Is the following true: Two massive bodies with variable distance between them do not emit GR in any direction Two bodies that revolve around common center will not emit in the plane of their orbits ...
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2answers
507 views

Laws of gravity for a universe that only consists of two objects?

So, we know that when two objects of normal matter get away from each other, the gravitational pull they feel from each other, decreases. I wanted to see how that would work. And in my ...
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1answer
200 views

quantum curvature

If a state can be a superposition of energy states, and mass equals energy (special relativity), and mass curves space-time (general relativity), then could we say that space-time around a quantum ...
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2answers
359 views

fourth rank tensor for stress energy

The Weyl tensor equates the Riemann tensor in vacuum $$ C_{\mu \nu \eta \lambda} = R_{\mu \nu \eta \lambda} $$ So it makes me wonder about the tensor $$T_{\mu \nu \eta \lambda} = C_{\mu \nu \eta ...
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1answer
248 views

Are “typical” black holes rotating, or stationary?

From my (somewhat limited) understanding of GR I know that there are two different kinds of solutions that produce a black hole, some that rotate and some that do not. What I can't figure out from my ...
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0answers
248 views

How can things at the event horizon slow down and appear to stop to a remote observer?

So they say the remote observer will never see anything fallen to the black hole, because any object will slow down as it gets closer to the event horizon and eventually stop to stay there forever. Am ...
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1answer
114 views

Are there any well-known theories successfully unifying the inertial and gravitational mass?

From what little I know of general relativity, the equality of inertial and gravitational mass is an axiom of the theory. I suspect that this precludes GR from unifying them in the same sense as ...
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7answers
3k views

According to General Relativity, Does The Past “Exist”?

I'm curious about just what is meant by time being another dimension, like the three (observable) spatial dimensions. Does this imply, according to General Relativity, that the past and the future ...
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1answer
754 views

Is 4-volume element a scalar or a pseudoscalar in special relativity?

In general relativity 4-volume element $\mathrm{d}^4 x = \mathrm{d} x^0\mathrm{d} x^1 \mathrm{d} x^2\mathrm{d} x^3$ is clearly a pseudoscalar (or scalar density) of weight 1 since it transforms as ...
5
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1answer
346 views

Variable speed of light in cosmology

In this paper, D. H. Coule argues that warp drive metrics, like the one proposed by Alcubierre, require the exotic matter to be laid beforehand on the travel path by conventional travel. At section 5 ...
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0answers
77 views

Reference request: FLRW with k>0, dust, and positive cosmological constant

The exact solution representing a FLRW universe with $k>0$ and dust (p=0), and $\Lambda=0$, is described by a cycloid. What is the exact solution for dust, in the presence of a positive ...
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1answer
147 views

How can a deSitter space have finite size?

a deSitter space is a maximally symmetric solution of Einstein equations, I have some problem picturing one thing: this space is past and future (time) infinite but spatial slices have finite size, ...
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1answer
511 views

geometry inside the event horizon

I'm trying to understand intuitively the geometry as it would look to an observer entering the event horizon of a schwarszchild black hole. I would appreciate any insights or corrections to the above. ...
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1answer
1k views

What's next after Higgs Boson discovery? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Practical matter of the Higgs-Mechanism As everybody knows that the Higgs Boson was discovered on July 4th,2012, I am so curious about it. What are the possible ...
3
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1answer
132 views

Why does the cosmic censorship conjecture hold so well?

Why does the cosmic censorship conjecture hold so well? Penrose proposed spacelike singularities and closed timelike curves are always hidden behind event horizons in general relativity. His ...
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0answers
83 views

quadripolar moment in curved space

So, i'm going over the Thorne's derivation of the quadrupolar radiation term, and they write the core term as: $$ \frac{3 r_i r_j - 2 r^2 \delta_{ij}}{4 r^5} $$ But if i try to obtain this term by ...
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3answers
311 views

Could general relativity and gauge theories in principle be covered in one course?

It's always nice to point out the structural similarieties between (semi-)Riemannian geometry and gauge field theories alla Classical yang Mills theories. Nevertheless, I feel the relation between the ...
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1answer
397 views

Mathematical description in GR

I have heard a phrase somewhere, which can be reduced to the following two points: 1) There exists a handy and underused mathematical apparatus applicable to GR, comparing to which tensor calculus is ...
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4answers
244 views

Can a huge gravitational force cause visible distortions on an object

In space, would it be possible to have an object generating such a huge gravitational force so it would be possible for an observer (not affected directly by gravitational force and the space time ...
3
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4answers
366 views

Formulation of general relativity

EDIT: I think I can pinpoint my confusion a bit better. Here comes my updated question (I'm not sure what the standard way of doing things is - please let me know if I should delete the old version). ...
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1answer
205 views

models for astrophysical relativistic jets from compact objects

what is the simplest way to understand the physics of relativistic jets? we know that they have axial symmetry with very tight angular spread, presumably aligned with the axis of rotation of the ...
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1answer
72 views

Tower redshift paradox

If photons are emitted at intervals a, from the top of a tower of height $h$, down to earth, is this formula correct for the intervals b in which they are received at earth? $b=a(1-gh/c^2)$ If so, how ...
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2answers
129 views

What is gravitational speed for a black hole? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the escape velocity of a Black Hole? This is gravitational speed for earth: $$v=\sqrt {g_{e}r}.$$ What is gravitational speed for a black hole? I want an ...
4
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1answer
162 views

How should one interpret the de Sitter slicings?

When 'constructing' the usual de Sitter space in $\mathcal{M^5}$ by invoking the contraint $-X^{2}_{0} +X^{2}_{1} +X^{2}_{2} +X^{2}_{3} + X^{2}_{4} = \alpha^2$ we quickly see that we end up with a ...
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3answers
315 views

How to connect Einstein's Special Relativity(SR) with General Relativity(GR)?

How Einstein's SR becomes GR? $$ds^2=dr^2-c^2dt^2,$$ $$ds^2=g_{\mu\nu}dx^{\mu}dx^{\nu}.$$ When the $s$ is constant $ds^2=0$, isn't it true? How to connect Einstein's SR with GR? What is the ...
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2answers
561 views

Why is GR renormalizable to one loop?

I have read in a few places that GR is renormalizable at one loop. (hep-th/9809169 for example, second sentence, although they don't seem to develop this point at all). Is this do to some hidden ...
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2answers
200 views

what is relation between time and space in general relativity?

there is a relation between time and space in special theory of relativity: $$t^2c^2-L^2=\tau^2.c^2$$ what is relation between time and space in general relativity?
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1answer
422 views

failing to see the conundrum in the Einstein hole argument

I've been reading about the Einstein hole argument, and i fail to understand what makes active diffeomorphisms "special" compared to passive diffeomorphismsm also known as good old coordinate ...
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1answer
615 views

warp drive with gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime

gravitational waves are strictly transversal (in the linear regime at least), also their amplitudes are tiny even for cosmic scale events like supernovas or binary black holes (at least far away, ...
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3answers
216 views

What does Brian Greene mean when he claims we wont be able to observe light from distant stars due to the universe's expansion?

Brian Greene in this TED talk about possible multiverse, claims tomwards the end (At around 18:00 mark) this statement. 'Because the expansion is speeding up, in the very far future, those galaxies ...
5
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4answers
6k views

If gravity is a bend in Space-time then what is magnetism?

Einstein postulated that gravity bends the geometry of space-time then what does magnetism do in to the geometry of space-time, or is there even a correlation between space-time geometry and ...
5
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8answers
3k views

Black hole - white hole (collision)

A non-spinning, equally massive black hole and white hole experience a direct collision. What shall happen? What shall be the result of such a collision?
2
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0answers
231 views

How is the poincare conjecture(and perelman proof) helpful in studying the properties of the universe?

Can someone tell me how the poincare's famous conjecture or its proof by perelmen can be helpful in deciding some properties like the shape of the universe?
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2answers
338 views

length contraction question

we know from eintein's theory of relativity that lets say, a ruler is travelling to a speed if light, then we can say that the ruler (from our view as observers) has shorten. but why, lets say we have ...
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3answers
392 views

How much choice did Einstein have in choosing his GR equations?

General relativity was summarised by Wheeler as "Spacetime tells matter how to move; Matter tells spacetime how to curve". I have a fairly good mental picture of how the first part works. However, I ...
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1answer
138 views

extracting energy from cosmological expansion

This question is a more concrete reincarnation of an old question about energy conservation in GR. Are there mechanisms to extract energy from the cosmic rate of expansion? putting some extremely ...
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3answers
355 views

Do objects with mass “suck in” spacetime?

I don't really understand the general theory of relativity (GTR) really deeply, but according to my understanding, the GTR say that gravitation is caused by the curvature of spacetime by objects with ...
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1answer
82 views

Space station gains enough mass to lose orbit?

I.S.S is constantly being improved (add-ons). Will the space station need to be moved to a higher orbit at some point?