A theory that describes how matter produces and responds to the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

8
votes
2answers
791 views

What happens to orbits at small radii in general relativity?

I know that (most) elliptic orbits precess due to the math of general relativity, like this: source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-body_problem_in_general_relativity I also know that something ...
13
votes
4answers
1k views

To which extent is general relativity a gauge theory?

In quantum mechanics, we know that a change of frame -- a gauge transform -- leaves the probability of an outcome measurement invariant (well, the square modulus of the wave-function, i.e. the ...
4
votes
1answer
185 views

What's the deal with the gyroscope?

In this article ("The problem with physics", Tony Rothman, ABC science) the author says in the 5$^\textrm{th}$ paragraph: For example, one needs only first-semester equations to describe ...
1
vote
1answer
164 views

Why is energy-momentum 4-vector so much easier to explore/observe than spacetime 4-vector

I have read that spacetime 4-vector is quite difficult to observe/explore and that energy-momentum 4-vector is much more appropriate for CERN etc. Why is that? Could anyone give me a brief ...
6
votes
1answer
443 views

Can a deformable object “swim” in curved space-time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Swimming in Spacetime - apparent conserved quantity violation It is well known that a deformable object can perform a finite rotation in space by performing deformations ...
7
votes
1answer
216 views

Materials with different gravitomagnetic permeability?

If you start with general relativity, and assume small perturbations around a nearly flat metric, it is possible to obtain linearized equations of gravity that look a lot like Maxwell's equations, ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

GR limit with massless particles and strong fields

What the mechanics arises if to take limit of general relativity with massless particles interacting with strong fields? Suppose there a system of attracting particles that have zero rest mass. What ...
4
votes
2answers
290 views

Does General Relativity encompass Special Relativity?

Can all of the predictions made in Special Relativity (SR) also be made in General Relativity (GR)?
5
votes
2answers
909 views

What is background independence and how important is it?

What is background independence and how important is it? In order to be a theory of everything, will the final string-theory/m-theory have to be background independent? Does the current lack of ...
8
votes
2answers
439 views

Wavefunction collapse and gravity

If gravity can be thought of as both a wave (the gravitational wave, as predicted to exist by Albert Einstein and certain calculations) and a particle (the graviton), would it make sense to apply ...
6
votes
2answers
817 views

Do black holes have infinite areas and volumes?

How to calculate the area / volume of a black hole? Is there a corresponding mathematical function such as rotating $1/x$ around the $x$-axis or likewise to find the volume?
4
votes
3answers
589 views

Action for a point particle in a curved spacetime

Is this action for a point particle in a curved spacetime correct? $$\mathcal S =-Mc \int ds = -Mc \int_{\xi_0}^{\xi_1}\sqrt{g_{\mu\nu}(x)\frac{dx^\mu(\xi)}{d\xi} \frac{dx^\nu(\xi)}{d\xi}} \ \ d\xi$$
0
votes
0answers
165 views

Can Parallel Transport always move a Vector Parallel to Itself?

Consider two tiny plane(flat) surfaces A and B meeting at a straight line L.We have a preassigned vector on A at some point P on it.Is it always possible to have a vector parallel to the first one ...
7
votes
0answers
111 views

Kerr solution for finite collapse time

The Kerr black hole solutions gives an analytic continuation that is asymptotically flat. Some people have argued that this is another universe, but others state that the analytic continuation ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

observable quantities are gauge invariant?

I have a simply question, that is whether spatial velocity is gauge invariant. It is seems that under a infinitesimal coordinate transformation the velocity is just transform as other vectors, and it ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

transition between extremal and nonextremal black hole states

Extremal black holes are at zero temperature, hence they do not radiate. my question is twofold: 1) is extremality of micro black holes a stable property? electric charge is quickly emitted from ...
0
votes
1answer
443 views

On Parallel Transport

Let's consider the issue of parallel transport in relation to the figure on the following Wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_transport With reference to the Figure on the link: ...
6
votes
0answers
290 views

Alcubierre warp bubble effect on gravity and space

I read the question Faster-than-light communication using Alcubierre warp drive metric around a single qubit?, and these questions came to mind: What kind of impact would an Alcubierre warp bubble ...
1
vote
2answers
255 views

Cosmology questions from a novice

These ideas/questions probably represent a lack of understanding on my part, but here they are: 1) Cosmologists talk about the increasing speed of expansion of the universe and talk of dark energy as ...
4
votes
2answers
372 views

What is the consequence of “infinite” gravitational force?

Introduction I am a mathematically minded individual. I do not intuitively comprehend physics, and as a sophomore in high school who has only taken Intro to Physics in his freshman year, I may very ...
17
votes
2answers
655 views

is there a way to split a black hole?

Classically, black holes can merge, becoming a single black hole with an horizon area greater than the sum of both merged components. Is it thermodynamically / statistically possible to split a black ...
1
vote
3answers
635 views

Mechanism for the gravitational field generated by photons

This question follows from a schooling I received in this thread. I figured that photons do not interact with gravity, except when they've spontaneously converted into a particle-antiparticle pair. ...
0
votes
2answers
462 views

Newton's third law and General relativity

Is Newton's third law valid at the General Relativity? Newton's second law, the force exerted by body 2 on body 1 is: $$F_{12}$$ The force exerted by body 1 on body 2 is: $$F_{21}$$ According to ...
-2
votes
3answers
683 views

How do the Einstein's differential equation of the curvature of spacetime come out of Einstein's field equation?

The classical theory of spacetime geometry that we call gravity consists of the Einstein equation, which relates the curvature of spacetime to the distribution of matter and energy in spacetime. ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

An issue about the compactness and the existence of CTCs

There is a well known fact that a compact spacetime necessarily contains a closed timelike curve (CTC). Proof can be found in several books on GR (e.g. Hawking, Ellis, Proposition 6.4.2), and in ...
2
votes
1answer
711 views

Potential Energy in General Relativity

I often hear about how general relativity is very complicated because of all forms of energy are considered, including gravitation's own gravitational binding energy. I have two questions: In ...
8
votes
2answers
861 views

Can we have a black hole without a singularity?

Assuming we have a sufficiently small and massive object such that it's escape velocity is greater than the speed of light, isn't this a black hole? It has an event horizon that light cannot escape, ...
6
votes
5answers
807 views

General relativity and the microscopic/macroscopic distinction

Here is Wikipedia's diagram of the stress-energy tensor in general relativity: I notice that all of its elements are what would be termed "macroscopic" quantities in thermodynamics. That is, in ...
4
votes
1answer
835 views

How do Einstein's field equations come out of string theory?

The classical theory of spacetime geometry that we call gravity is described at its core by the Einstein field equations, which relate the curvature of spacetime to the distribution of matter and ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

Is String Theory formulated in flat or curved spacetime?

String Theory is formulated in 10 or 11 (or 26?) dimensions where it is assumed that all of the space dimensions except for 3 (large) space dimensions and 1 time dimension are a compact manifold with ...
2
votes
0answers
52 views

What is (or where can I discover) the Burke Potential?

I have very much enjoyed William L. Burke's Applied Differential Geometry. Reading around on the web it seems that he discovered something which is called the (retarded) Burke Potential, but I have ...
1
vote
2answers
319 views

Are the intersections of past and future light cones spacelike?

Given a timelike reference worldline (not necessarily geodesic), we can define light-cone coordinates $\tau^+$ and $\tau^-$ so that the 3-D hypersurfaces of constant $\tau^+$ are past light cones of ...
3
votes
1answer
538 views

Problem with convergent geodesics at 2D sphere

There is a chapter on general relativity in the book Spacetime Physics Introduction To Special Relativity by Taylor and Wheeler, which qualitatively explains how attractive gravitational force can be ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

Information faster-than-light and GR vs. QM

What is meant by the statement that information cannot travel faster than light? If I write down something on a paper, isn't there according to QM a non-zero probability that an identical paper can ...
-2
votes
1answer
187 views

Way to escape from a black hole

I’ve had a question on WHY a traveler couldn’t “escape” from a black hole under specific conditions (I have an image I'd like to send to clarify, but the website won't let me)> The key is for the ...
14
votes
1answer
359 views

Positivity of Total Gravitational Energy in GR

I read the following statement in the introduction to an article: Over the last 30 years, one of the greatest achievements in classical general relativity has certainly been the proof of the ...
1
vote
1answer
252 views

Where did Karl Schwarzschild derived his solution?

Does anyone know more about circumstances of Karl Schwarzschild at the Russian front in 1915 where he allegedly derived his famous solution of the Einstein equations (describing a black hole)? Sources ...
4
votes
3answers
560 views

Vacuum energy and perpetual motion

The part of the Einstein equations of general relativity referred to vacuum energy, introduce a repulsive term in gravity. This means that as the space become bigger and bigger, vacuum part become ...
1
vote
4answers
158 views

How do black holes accrete mass?

Thanks to time dilation, a distant observer watching a man fall in to a black hole will only see him asymptotically approach the event horizon. So how do black holes ever get bigger?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Tiling hexagons on a sphere surface

In attemopt to understand basic principles of non-Euclidean geometry and its relation to physical space, I am reading General Relativity by Ben Crowell. On page 149 there is a discussion of hexagons ...
4
votes
2answers
349 views

Another faster-than-light question

Imagine we have something very heavy (i.e supermassive black hole) and some object that we can throw with 0.999999 speed of light (i.e proton). We are throwing our particle in the direction of hole. ...
5
votes
1answer
362 views

Kerr geodesics differential equations in equatorial plane

With friend, we are writing an interactive educational simulation of particle falling into a black hole. Currently we use Schwarzschild geodesics. However, we want to generalize it to the case of ...
10
votes
1answer
625 views

Is spacetime flat inside a spherical shell?

In a perfectly symmetrical spherical hollow shell, there is a null net gravitational force according to Newton, since in his theory the force is exactly inversely proportional to the square of the ...
-1
votes
1answer
104 views

What else does the fabric of space-time do?

I know that, the fabric of space is bended so there is a path for another planet to follow to cause gravity I.E. the sun and the earth ( i think) Is htere any othe rthing's the fabric of space-time ...
2
votes
1answer
228 views

What's the difference between the equivalence principle and curvature of spacetime?

Calculating using the equivalence principle only accounts for half the deflection of light, whereas the other half is from curvature of space-time. But isn't the equivalence principle the same thing ...
5
votes
3answers
290 views

Extending General Relativity with Kahler Manifolds?

Standard general relativity is based on Riemannian manifolds. However, the simplest extension of Riemannian manifolds seems to be Kahler manifolds, which have a complex (hermitian) structure, a ...
3
votes
1answer
731 views

What bends fabric of space-time?

I know that mass can bend fabric of space-time, which causes gravity by making an object curve around a planet or star but is there anything else that can bend it? Other energy sources, forces ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Gravity stronger than electromagnetic force in a black hole?

Well, the question has somewhat been answered before, but there's one part missing, which - I'd think - is in conflict with the physical laws. The earlier reply says that the gravitational pull even ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Ultracold atoms and General theory of Relativty

I am looking for good reviews for the subject of Ultracold atoms and it's application in test of General theory of relativity. I am planning to pick up this topic as a semester project, can somebody ...
0
votes
1answer
884 views

Metric tensor under coordinate transformation x to y(x)

Say I have a metric representation $g_{\mu\nu}$ in a coordinate system $x$ and I want to find the representation of the metric in a new set of coordinates $y = y(x)$. I know how to do this if you are ...