A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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Variation of square root of determinant of metric, $\delta g$ [closed]

I am trying to calculate $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}},$$ where $g = \text{det} g_{\mu \nu}$. We have $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}} = - \frac{1}{2 ...
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2answers
66 views

time span in a black hole vs earth [closed]

This is a thought experiment: I am an immortal and I live for 1 billion years on earth. My identical twin brother spends the same amount of time in/on a black hole. To him, did he spend exactly 1 ...
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1answer
109 views

Predicting path of light?(general relativity and electromagnetism)

In the first image we can see bending of light by gravity,in the second image I placed a big glass(it almost has zero weight) of considerable thickness near sun which will refract light coming ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Performing the two slit experiment under a strong gravitational force

For elementary particles, are their associated De Broglie wavelengths affected by the spacetime curvature produced by large mass density values? I ask this as a newcomer to Q.M. so apologies if I ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Why is gravity sensitive to absolute energies?

In QFT absolute energies play no role in the physical set-up, only relative energies (i.e. energy differences) are important. However, in general relativity this doesn't appear to be the case, I've ...
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1answer
136 views

What causes gravity in M-Theory?

New and updated, because people were misunderstanding what I meant! General relativity describes gravity as the result of....(very roughly) spacetime curvature Newtonian gravity describes gravity as ...
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4answers
85 views

How would the twins paradox be affected by wormholes?

The famous twins paradox where one twin travels to a distant star and returns to find an aged brother can be resolved with general relativity pretty easily, but I was wondering about this: If the ...
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0answers
36 views

Chronology protection for non-geodesic CTCs and imprisoned curves

As far as I can make out, the quantum part of the Chronology Protection Conjecture hinges on the fact that in curved space, in the semiclassical approximation, the stress energy tensor contains a term ...
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2answers
83 views

Infinite Accelatation

Before I ask my question, let me just say, I know very little about particle physics and general relativity, so I may ask a obvious question or a question that makes little or no sense. Now, what ...
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1answer
376 views

2D space-time curvature

Actually, why is the space-time curvature considered 2D plane. As 2-D dimensional space-time curve is used to explain why moon revolves around the earth stating because the massive objects wraps the ...
2
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0answers
60 views

Black Hole - Between event horizon and singularity

Dear Physics Board Users What is between the singularity and the event horizon? If the gravitation gets bigger and bigger coming nearer to a black hole, is then the gravition inside even bigger that ...
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4answers
162 views

How far apart do two objects have to be for there to be negligible force between them?

Inspired from the commentary on this question. How far apart do two objects have to be for the gravitational force between them to be negligible? By negligible I mean, that it could never be ...
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Highest symmetric non-maximally symmetric spacetime

What is the highest number of symmetries (Killing vectors) that a (4-dimensional) spacetime can have without being maximally symmetric? From what I can see, it seems to be 7 (which includes the ...
2
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1answer
50 views

What is the utility of ADM decomposition of the space-time metric?

I know it's one of the possibility of quantization of gravitational field's degree of freedom but it is introduced also in other situation. My question is which is the powerful of this kind of ...
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1answer
40 views

What is the difference between the expansion of space and the Alcubierre drive?

The Alcubierre drive violates causality. As far as I know the expansion of space does not. The usual explanation for why space is allowed to go FTL is that the matter doesn't move. The Alcubierre ...
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2answers
67 views

Stand on a black hole

Is there an theoretical possibility that an black hole rotates so fast that the acceleration pushing you out of the black hole is nearly equal to the gravity?
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2answers
58 views

Do quantum wave functions curve spacetime before they are measured

Do wave functions cause spacetime curvature before they are measured, or would curvature only happen upon measurement? I guess the question becomes, do quantum wavefunctions carry energy while they ...
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1answer
86 views

Does acceleration of time explain gravity (rather than the other way round)? [closed]

I have a question about interpreting (explaining, even) the general theory of relativity. A common interpretation of GR, as I understand it, is to imagine two-dimensional space represented by ...
3
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0answers
82 views

Why do physicists believe the “no-hair conjecture” to be true? [duplicate]

The no-hair conjecture states that a black hole is completely characterized by its mass, electric charge, and angular momentum. Most physicists take it as given. My question is, why? It implies the ...
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3answers
94 views

Do gravitational waves exist at the quantum level?

Do gravitational waves exist at quantum level produced by electrons or by atoms or by molecules? If yes, which particle produces them and how are they produced? Spacetime exists at a quantum level ...
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1answer
90 views

What would be gravity in one spatial dimension? [duplicate]

First of all, I should say that I understand if this is put on hold for being unclear... but I'll try my best to make it as clear as it can get. For all the time I spent learning Newtonian Gravity ...
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1answer
59 views

Does spacetime exists inside matter? [closed]

Does spacetime exits inside matter like in the atom or molecule? If yes,my other question would be as electron moves inside atom, can it create gravitational waves(I know they will be very small in ...
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2answers
82 views

If energy isn't globally conserved, can we extract useful “free” work?

Previously, we discussed why energy is not globally conserved under general relativity. It seems counterintuitive to me, however. Does this mean we can extract useful work from this "free" energy? ...
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1answer
17 views

Black hole physics beyond the perturbation theory

Motivated by this question: Perturbation of a Schwarzschild Black Hole How would one deal with the situation where black hole experiences not only small perturbations but major changes to the metric? ...
4
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2answers
110 views

Gravity in 2d space and inverse linear law

In our three-dimensional universe, gravity obeys the inverse square law. In a four-dimensional universe, gravity would be expected to obey the inverse cube law et cetera. In a two-dimensional ...
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0answers
23 views

How does space-time behaves between opposite gravitational pulls? [duplicate]

this is my first question in physics.stackexchange. I'll try to be more specific. I have a very basic understanding that time flows (is there a better word?) differently depending on the gravity ...
2
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3answers
114 views

Why photons reflect off glass?

Why photon reflects and refracts through glass? Some photons pass through glass and some reflects.I know this is due to energy levels of electrons of glass, an incoming photon is unable to excite the ...
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2answers
100 views

Could you view yourself in high gravity situations?

I'm trying to understand what effects gravity can have on light. First of all, I don't understand how gravity can even affect it, since it doesn't have mass, right? That is probably a separate ...
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1answer
59 views

A closed 1-form as a potential of electromagnetic field? [closed]

With first variation of an action (my action is formed naturally by scalar curvature of a semi-Riemannian transitive lie algebroid which I used as a framework for forces unification). I derived an ...
2
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2answers
74 views

Can a GPS system detect the decline in the rotational velocity of the Earth?

From Wikipedia: Rotation in Angular Velocity of Earth Earth's rotation is slowing slightly with time; thus, a day was shorter in the past. This is due to the tidal effects the Moon has on Earth's ...
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1answer
78 views

Geometric meaning of spin connection

A very short question: Does the spin connection that we encounter in General Relativity $$\omega_{\mu,ab}$$ have a geometric meaning? I am supposing it does because it comes from mathematical terms ...
3
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2answers
173 views

General Relativity and acceleration

Suppose I am riding an amusement park ride. This ride is a circular Plexiglass structure that spins at high speed. If I measure the circumference of the structure(while the ride was spinning) with a ...
1
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2answers
104 views

Is it plausible for spacetime to be shaped something like a torus? [duplicate]

I have heard three theories for how space-time is shaped, flat, sphere-like, or saddle-like. Flat is the most likely, as all our measurements implies that space time has curvature close to 0. Is it ...
3
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0answers
48 views

If it takes infinitely long for someone to fall in a black hole, wouldn't it evaporate first? [duplicate]

Let's say I decide to jump into a large black hole. A distant observer never sees me enter the black hole, but he does see the black hole evaporate. According to this reasoning, I would then keep ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Why $C_{abcd}C^{abcd}$ in de Sitter–Schwarzschild metric doesn't depend on $\Lambda$

With the de Sitter–Schwarzschild metric: $$ds^2=-\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}-\frac{\Lambda r^2}{3}\right)dt^2+\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}-\frac{\Lambda r^2}{3}\right)^{-1}dr^2+r^2d\theta+r^2\sin^2\theta d\phi$$ I ...
2
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0answers
40 views

Relativistic rotational squeezing?

I would like to consider a sphere rotating at very high angular speeds, such that the speed in its equator would be relativistic. This is very similar to Ehrenfest paradox situation, except that ...
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0answers
30 views

Clarification of Type D space-time

I've asked this question on MathOverflow but received no feedback, so I thought I'd try better luck here. I've read the following formulation of the Goldberg-Sachs theorem in Chandrasekhar's ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Infinite dimensional manifolds in general relativity [closed]

In GR the concept of a manifold is very useful. However, all of these manifolds are of finite dimension. Is it possible to define a manifold with infinite dimension (ie much like Hilbert space in QM) ...
1
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3answers
163 views

General relativity without energy?

I am kind of new to GR but I have been familiar with the concepts for a long time, I am getting used to the mathematics just now. My question is, what would GR predict if we would have an empty ...
0
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0answers
43 views

Problems of General Relativity on small and large scales [duplicate]

As far as I know, the most important problem of GR on large scales is the cosmological constant problem which in some manner can be thought of as a dark energy problem (please correct me if I am ...
1
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1answer
39 views

If there is a point in a past set, does its chronological future interset a future set?

This post concerns the causality of spacetime $\mathcal M$. A future set $F$ is defined to be the chronological future of some set $S\in \mathcal M$, ie., $F=I^+[S]$. Similiarly, a past set ...
5
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3answers
332 views

Confusion about 1-forms as introduced in “Gravitation” (Kip S. Thorne,…)

In the book Gravitation in chapter 2, paragraph 5, they introduce the concept of 1-forms by thinking about the momentum 4-vector differently. They first introduce the de Broglie 1-form as follows (I ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Hermiticity of Dirac operator in curved spacetime

The Dirac Lagrangian in curved spacetime is usually given by \begin{equation} \mathcal{L} = i\bar{\Psi}\gamma^a e^{\mu}_a(\partial_\mu + \frac{1}{4}\omega_{\mu bc}\gamma^b\gamma^c)\Psi \end{equation} ...
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3answers
110 views

GR time dilation cares only about local curvature, right?

Regarding this remark on Worldbuilding SE and the discussion leading up to it: Can someone properly knowledgeable on the subject please explain whether the time dilation due to being in a gravitation ...
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1answer
52 views

Event horizon from the metric

Let us suppose we have a metric of this form $$ds^2=-A(r)dt^2+\frac{dr^2}{B(r)}+r^2d\Omega^2$$ In all documents I can read, I've seen that the event horizon is defined by considering $A(r)=0$ But I ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Does General Relativity say that the Laws of Physics are the same in all Reference Frames?

Most texts on General Relativity seem to imply that Einstein generalized the Relativity Principle (that all reference frames are equivalent) to include changes in velocity (accelerations); but then go ...
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1answer
27 views

The equivalence principle and experiments concerning it?

Imagine that we are in a rocket accelerating with some magnitude $a_1 = dx^2/d^2t$, also imagine that we have a stationary rocket ship in close proximity to ours, stationary relative to our reference ...
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1answer
66 views

Does $R_{\mu \nu \sigma \rho} R^{\mu \nu \sigma \rho} \propto R$ hold?

For $R_{\mu \nu \sigma \rho}$ the Riemann-tensor and $R$ the Ricci-scalar: Does $R_{\mu \nu \sigma \rho} R^{\mu \nu \sigma \rho} \propto R$ hold? Or is there any way to relate $R$ approximately ...
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0answers
15 views

Cosmological constant in General Relativity [duplicate]

According to my GR notes the cosmological constant can be thought of as a vacuum energy much in the same way as the ground state of the harmonic oscillator. The notes claim that the regularised energy ...
0
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1answer
80 views

What is the conformal mode of a metric?

I have a problem in terminology. This article talks about the conformal mode of a physical metric. I know what a conformal transformation is. But what is the conformal mode of a metric?