A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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G4v Gravity Theory: Why does this get rid of Dark Energy?

Earlier this year, Carver Mead of CalTech published a paper which seems to be garnering a lot of attention: http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.04866 http://www.npl.washington.edu/AV/altvw180.html ...
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1answer
81 views

Quantum teleportation + time dilation = time travel? [closed]

Thought of this a while back and thought it was pretty funny, not sure if there's been similar ideas discussed elsewhere. I can think of at least 2 reasons this won't work: 1) As far as I know, ...
5
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1answer
92 views

Non-Euclidean mechanics; is it useful?

Special relativity has the following single-particle Lagrangian: $$S = \int_{t_0}^{t_f}\sqrt {\langle \mathrm d\vec{s},\mathrm d\vec{s}\rangle}.$$ Clearly it is based on Euclidean norms; it is in ...
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56 views

Shapes in a black hole

A question around an answer of Timaeus What happens to a particle in the exact center of a Kerr black hole?-answer Outside both is a normal type region of spacetime. In between the two the $r$ ...
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3answers
223 views
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143 views

Why acceleration cannot vanish everywhere?

In attempt to introduce gr concepts When there are gravitational accelerations present, as for example in the gravitational field of the earth, the space cannot be the flat Minkowski space. Indeed, ...
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1answer
53 views

What happens if locally manifold is seen as an Euclidean space? [closed]

I have been trying to understand the definition of a manifold and I have found out that the most common definition can be paraphrased as: A manifold is a space that has a complex "topology" globally ...
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1answer
628 views

Why do people put exponentials there

In his book, Sean Carroll, says p. 194 chapter 5: To impose spherical symmetry, we begin b writing the metric of Minkowski space in polar coordinates $x^{\mu}=(t,r, \theta, \phi)$: $$ ...
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42 views

Two black holes prepared from different initial states

I have asked a similar question, I would like to reformulate it in more details. Here is a thought experiment: Assuming we can create black holes by squeezing photons, we can then prepare two ...
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25 views

A problem with ADM mass in the derivation of 1st law of black hole thermodynamics

The definition of ADM mass is $M=\frac{1}{16\pi}\lim_{r\rightarrow\infty}\int(\frac{\partial h_{\mu\nu}}{\partial x^\mu}-\frac{\partial h_{\mu\mu}}{\partial x^\nu})N^\nu dA$ according to Wald. ...
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1answer
77 views

Components of dual vectors

(This is a close retelling of Wald, problem 2.4b. Not for homework; just curiosity and an increasingly alarming suspicion that I've never actually understood anything.) Let $Y_1 ... Y_n$ be a ...
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82 views

Gravitational waves: novel or confirmatory? [duplicate]

If the rumors are true and gravitational waves have been detected, would we learn any new fundamental physics from them? Or is this simply an important confirmation of a prediction of general ...
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592 views

Movie Interstellar - Followup Question to Escape Velocity

Continuing the discussion on this thread: Movie Interstellar - Question about Escape Velocity The movie Interstellar shows people on a water planet where time is dilated so much that 1 hour is equal ...
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104 views

If gravity is due to curvature, how does gravity work in situations with no curvature?

The strength of the gravitational field falls off as the inverse square of the distance from a spherical source. It only falls off as the inverse of the distance from an extended cylindrical or line ...
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2answers
94 views

How much additional light does Earth receive from the Sun due to Earth's gravitational field?

I was reading about how gravity affects light, and that got me wondering how much additional light is collected by the Sun due to the Earth's gravitational field. Is it a significant amount of light ...
3
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2answers
119 views

Redshift due to a static gravitational field and the conservation of energy [duplicate]

I am standing on the surface of some planet. Gravity is described via General Relativity with some static metric (e.g. the Schwarzschild metric, so static means no time dependence, but the metric may ...
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1answer
1k views

Obtaining a copy of Hawking's Ph.D thesis - Properties of Expanding Universes

Due to its popularity, I am interested to know the 4 chapter titles and topics covered in S.W. Hawking Ph.D, Properties of Expanding Universes. I also ask this because that thesis is hardly available. ...
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0answers
57 views

A possible proof that time traveling to the past with the aid of a wormhole is impossible?

Suppose a wormhole connects two part of the place where I live. I find myself in a spaceship attached to one side of the hole, and my wife on the other side, so we can see and talk to each other. Now ...
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1answer
37 views

Gravity, Acceleration, Time Dilation and the Equivalence Principle

Three clocks are started at exactly the same time on Earth. The first and second clocks are taken into the vacuum of space. The first clock accelerates until it reaches 100,000m/s, then stays at this ...
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2answers
456 views

Time dilation in a gravitational field and the equivalence principle

A clock near the surface of the earth will run slower than one on the top of the mountain. If the equivalence principal tells us that being at rest in a gravitational field is equivalent to being in ...
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4answers
443 views

What truly is mass, and is there a direct way to measure it?

We know a mass of an object of one kilogram as an object that weighs W = mg = 9.8 N and we reference it to that, (when it should as a fundamental parameter describe weight not the opposite). But if we ...
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1answer
46 views

Divergence of inverse of metric tensor

I know that the Levi-civita connection preserves the metric tensor. Is the divergence of the inverse of metric tensor zero, too?! I'm not so familiar with the divergence of the second ranked tensor. ...
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2answers
44 views

Is there a doppler effect on the images of stars around rotating black holes?

I'm an illustrator working on a project involving rotating black holes like those discussed in "Gravitational Lensing by Spinning Black Holes in Astrophysics, and in the Movie Interstellar" by James, ...
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1answer
55 views

Evaporating black hole Penrose diagram

The context for this is the diagram from From where (in space-time) does Hawking radiation originate? - the more I think of it, the less it makes any sense ) This particular question is about ...
3
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2answers
99 views

Does time have a minimum 'speed'?

Sorry if this is an ignorant question, but I've been having some trouble grasping some concepts related to time dilation. So far, my understanding of the concept says that if I am in a certain frame ...
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1answer
62 views

When is a spacetime a black hole?

While reading $\textrm{Present status of the Penrose Inequality}$ by Marc Mars, 2009, I was confused with the following statement: ... in order to determine whether a space-time is a black hole, ...
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1answer
118 views

Local translations in curved spacetime

A global Poincare transformation on a scalar field induces $$\delta(a, \lambda)\phi(x) = [a^{\mu}+\lambda^{\mu\nu}x_{\nu}]\partial_{\mu}\phi(x). \tag{11.46}$$ In curved spacetime we replace $a^{\mu} ...
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How much does the curvature of space change the volume of Earth by?

If we assume space is flat the volume of Earth is: $$ V = \frac{4 \pi R^3}{3} = \frac{4 \pi (6378.1 km)^3}{3} = 1.086 \times 10^{21} m^3 $$ The Einstein field equations, however, predict that the ...
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0answers
42 views

Worldlines in Schwarzschild geometry

I have an observer and a photon on a hypersurface $ \theta=\pi/2$ . My observer has $e, l$ constants of motion (energy and angular momentum divided by mass) and photon has $e',l'$. What conditions ...
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1answer
46 views

Graviton detector thought experiment

I was recently thinking of a thought experiment: Assumptions Graviton detectors can exist The equivalence principle will hold in the final theory of quantum gravity We can accelerate the graviton ...
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100 views

Literature request for books / review papers on gravitation, gauge theories and related mathematics [duplicate]

Similar to this reference, are there more such references / works [including textbooks] available in the literature? (A list would be greatly welcomed and appreciated.)
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2answers
328 views

Locally flat coordinate and Locally inertial frame

I am having some doubts on myself regarding the above concepts in General Relativity. First, I want to point out how I understand them so far. A male observer follows a timelike worldline ($\gamma$) ...
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2answers
561 views

Introduction to relativity books for an engineer [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Getting started general relativity I am an engineer who loves to read science fiction books especially when there's more science than fiction but usually I see that I ...
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1answer
42 views

Conditions at black hole's event horizon

This question had, at least partially, been discussed here before, but I feel that the record has not been set straight. There seem to be lack of agreement regarding conditions (like gravitational ...
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5answers
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Is the total energy of the universe constant?

If total energy is conserved just transformed and never newly created, is there a sum of all energies that is constant? Why is it probably not that easy?
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4answers
308 views

A ball in the gravity potential field of a black hole — seems a paradox

As illustrated in the following diagram (A, B, C, D are 4 specified space points, and C is close to a black hole), a small ball at distance of a black hole is stationary (suppose now it's mass is m0) ...
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5answers
125 views

Local inertial frame

In general relativity we introduce local inertial frames to be such frames where the laws of special relativity holds. Let $\xi^{\alpha}$ the coordinates in the local inertial frame, so we get ...
3
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2answers
116 views

How is the Ricci scalar $R=0$ here?

Given the metric in the form: $$ds^2 =-A(r)dt^2 +B(r) dr^2 dr^2 +r^2(d\theta ^2 +\sin^2\theta d\phi^2)$$ Papapetrou in his book said that $R=0$ But when I performed it I didn't get zero. For ...
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1answer
78 views

Duality and 1 forms

How is a dual map defined if we are talking about partial derivatives and 1 forms?
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2answers
123 views

Falling with same acceleration and meaning of gravity

My question is what does falling with same acceleration has to do with what Einstein concluded concerning the gravity in terms of the curvature?
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2answers
242 views

How to eliminate this cross term?

Given $$ds^2=-A(r)dt^2+B(r)dr^2+2C(r)drdt+D(r)r^2(d\theta^2+\sin^2d\phi^2),\tag{23.1}$$ How can we eliminate the cross term?
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5answers
666 views

Does coordinate time have physical meaning?

I have always been a little confused by the meaning of the "$t$" which appears in spacetime intervals or metrics in general relativity. I concluded that $t$ was just a mathematical thing which allow ...
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2answers
96 views

A manifold question: Why smooth functions and what is a Jacobian?

My question is what does a Jacobian have to do with the change of coordinates (coordinate transformation). Why do we care about this notion to start with? Also, why should it be non-singular?
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2answers
115 views

What does diagonalization mean here?

In a gravity theory in spacetime, the metric has signature $− + +· · ·+$. Concretely this means that the metric tensor $g_{μν}$ may be diagonalized by an orthogonal transformation, i.e. ...
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1answer
94 views

What does it look like for a ball falling to the event horizon observed by distant static observer?

Here is the picture used in susskind&Lindesay's book ''An Introduction to Black Holes, Information and String Theory Revolution'' I understand very well that the ball will be contracted at the ...
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3answers
645 views

Getting back out of an Alcubierre warp bubble

Does the theory on paper provide a way for hypothetical travelers to get back out of the bubble that has gotten them close to their distant destination by compressing all the space in front of them ...
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2answers
99 views

Shouldn't General Relativity Predict a Maximum Temperature?

I've seen a lot of questions about maximum temperature and “absolute hot” — several ask if special relativity places any limits on temperature (clearly not). (Also this discussion of absolute hot on a ...
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1answer
312 views

Higher-Dimensional Metrics in (Hyper)-Spherical Coordinates

I want to compute the components of the Riemann curvature tensor (for a case similar to the Schwarzschild solution) in 4 + 1 dimensions, but I want to use a higher-dimensional analogue of spherical ...
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3answers
484 views

Age of the universe versus absolute time [duplicate]

In Wikipedia, the age of the universe is defined as the "time elapsed since the Big Bang" while "time" links to "the cosmological time parameter of comoving coordinates" which itself links to "the ...
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0answers
19 views

Mass dilation in general relativity [duplicate]

Does mass dilate in general relativity. For example if I was accelerating will my mass dilate? Thanks