A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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Can negative energy explain black holes?

I think black holes are peculiar and I want to know if there is a relation to negative energy. Does negative energy have positive mass and therefore can explain the nature of black holes? IS there any ...
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3answers
941 views

Can we apply Schrodinger equation in Newton Gravitational potential and derive the deterministic Newton's gravitation as a special case of it

We know the solutions for wave functions of a an hydrogen atom, and the energy values as given by spectral analysis of radiation emitted by Hydrogen, confirms the possible energy states as predicted ...
2
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1answer
138 views

Spin connection and covariant derivative

How to prove explicitly (i.e., to don't postulate it) that by including Lorentz indices $a$ the covariant derivative $D_{\mu}$ looks like $$ D_{\mu}A^{\nu a} = \partial_{\mu}A^{\nu a} + ...
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48 views

Movement of bodies in space, affected only by gravity

I have been extensively studying General Relativity for some time now. Recently I asked myself a question which I can't answer. If the gravitational metric is determined by the Energy content of the ...
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2answers
185 views

Understanding Mach's principle: What does it answer?

What is the question that Mach tried to address in his principle? I mean, we know how to detect the inertial and non-inertial frames (by Newton’s law). Once this is understood we also see that due to ...
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32 views

What is the scale factor of a hyperbolic universe?

I wanted to derive the solution to this question from the Friedmann equations myself but I ran into some trouble. I was working in natural units where $c=G=1$, then, for brevity, I defined ...
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63 views

Why are gravitational forces always attractive? [duplicate]

In my curiosity, gravitational forces, unlike electric forces, is always attractive, because of the empirical evidence. However, why is it so? In what model or theory can this phenomena be explained ...
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1answer
80 views

Why curvature produced by electric field in spacetime is so small?

The electric field due to charge is $E=\frac{Q}{r^2}$. Why is the curvature in spacetime produced by this electric field so small? Let's say we want to calculate curvature(in spacetime) produced by ...
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1answer
137 views

What causes gravity in M-Theory?

New and updated, because people were misunderstanding what I meant! General relativity describes gravity as the result of....(very roughly) spacetime curvature Newtonian gravity describes gravity as ...
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269 views

Would warp bubbles emit gravitational Cerenkov radiation in general relativity?

Inspired by the gravtiomagnetic analogy, I would expect that just as a charged tachyon would emit normal (electromagetic) Cerenkov radiation, any mass-carrying warp drive would emit gravitational ...
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1answer
99 views

The ADM Energy of Gravitational Waves?

I have been looking for books about this question for several days. However, almost all books use Landau–Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the energy of Gravitational Waves.And they said the result ...
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503 views

Do intergalactic magnetic fields imply an Open Universe?

According to a paper on the arXiv (now published in Phys Rev D), they do. How credible is this result? The abstract says: The detection of magnetic fields at high redshifts, and in empty ...
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2answers
111 views

Why does gravity affect time?

So Special Relativity states that for all non-accelerating objects of matter the laws of physics are the same. I'm confused on why this law of physic applies to objects in acceleration and gravity ...
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3answers
125 views

General relativity without curvature?

Is there a reformulation of general relativity without curved space time, just with fields (like classical E&M)? Edit: removed the part about E&M with curvature (multiple posts).
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2answers
110 views

Could we be on the inside of a concave hollow universe?

Recently I was discussing this theory again (a little drunk, I admit) and then tried to find answers, but couldn't find anything satisfying. There is a theory (or several theories) that we could be ...
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3answers
103 views

Can we say that gravity(indirectly) is responsible for motion of electrons around nucleus? [closed]

From Wikipedia But because general relativity dictates that the presence of electromagnetic fields (or energy/matter in general) induce curvature in spacetime From Wikipedia An ...
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156 views

$U(1)$ 5-dimensional Kaluza-Klein topological defects

Five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory is well-known to predict that the electromagnetic field can be described as a curled additional dimension over four-dimensional spacetime. That is, you only need ...
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1answer
60 views

Is Hawking radiation valid for a microscopic black hole?

A black hole evaporates by Hawking radiation. The computation of the evaporation time uses some approximations. Question: Is the evaporation time valid for a microscopic black hole? In particular, ...
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2answers
230 views

How confident are we that mass is not being lost in the universe?

After reading about the latest super-massive black hole in Nature 518, 512–515 (26 February 2015), I couldn't help but wonder if the accelerating expansion is a result of mass being lost. My ...
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70 views

Are time and space interchangeable? [closed]

Mass and energy are interchangeable. Does that mean time and space are interchangeable too? Reason for question: The only difference I can comprehend between matter and energy is that energy has no ...
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2answers
733 views

What the lifetime of a massless black hole of photons?

Let a bundle of photons very concentrated in a very small area so that the space-time is curved as a black hole, and the photons can't escape: this is what I call a massless black hole of photons. ...
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1answer
118 views

If a black hole is just warped spacetime, then where is the electric charge?

I've heard Kip Thorne repeatedly state that matter is destroyed when a black hole is created, that all you are left with is distorted spacetime. "The idea that black holes are made from very ...
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1answer
110 views

Equivalence principle for test fields

My question is very simple. We all know that, for a test particle(classical) in a gravitational field, the motion is only determined by the geodesic lines(let's forget about the initial conditions for ...
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2answers
56 views

Variation of square root of determinant of metric, $\delta g$ [closed]

I am trying to calculate $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}},$$ where $g = \text{det} g_{\mu \nu}$. We have $$ \frac{\partial \sqrt{- g}}{\partial g^{\mu \nu}} = - \frac{1}{2 ...
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2answers
66 views

time span in a black hole vs earth [closed]

This is a thought experiment: I am an immortal and I live for 1 billion years on earth. My identical twin brother spends the same amount of time in/on a black hole. To him, did he spend exactly 1 ...
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4answers
480 views

If gravitation is due to space-time curvature, how can a body free-fall in a straight line?

According to general relativity, Gravity is due to space-time curvature. Then all paths must be curved. If so, how can there be any straight line motion? The body must follow a curved path. So, there ...
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1answer
109 views

Predicting path of light?(general relativity and electromagnetism)

In the first image we can see bending of light by gravity,in the second image I placed a big glass(it almost has zero weight) of considerable thickness near sun which will refract light coming ...
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2answers
238 views

Is space stretched with no limits by a black hole?

Some depictions of black holes show space being warped into a singularity, with no end, e.g. as pictured below. Moreover, in Cosmos, Neil Tyson speculates with the possibility that Black Holes contain ...
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1answer
57 views

Performing the two slit experiment under a strong gravitational force

For elementary particles, are their associated De Broglie wavelengths affected by the spacetime curvature produced by large mass density values? I ask this as a newcomer to Q.M. so apologies if I ...
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2answers
192 views

why do x Schwarzschild radii equal time dilation effects of speed of light going y times faster than an object^2?

let me walk you through the math. First you start with the gravitational time dilation formula where: $$ T_1=T\sqrt{1-\frac{2GM}{rc^2}} $$ and rather than entering $r$ for the radius we replace $r$ ...
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1answer
65 views

Why is gravity sensitive to absolute energies?

In QFT absolute energies play no role in the physical set-up, only relative energies (i.e. energy differences) are important. However, in general relativity this doesn't appear to be the case, I've ...
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4answers
85 views

How would the twins paradox be affected by wormholes?

The famous twins paradox where one twin travels to a distant star and returns to find an aged brother can be resolved with general relativity pretty easily, but I was wondering about this: If the ...
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1answer
393 views

Alcubierre warp bubble effect on gravity and space

I read the question Faster-than-light communication using Alcubierre warp drive metric around a single qubit?, and these questions came to mind: What kind of impact would an Alcubierre warp bubble ...
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376 views

2D space-time curvature

Actually, why is the space-time curvature considered 2D plane. As 2-D dimensional space-time curve is used to explain why moon revolves around the earth stating because the massive objects wraps the ...
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1answer
143 views

What is the covariant basis around a Schwarzschild black hole? [closed]

First of all, I'm not interested in time for this question. So lets consider a 3-manifold whose metric is the spatial part of the Schwarzschild metric, so it has the event horizon and the singularity ...
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305 views

Doesn't the Schwarzschild metric combined with Hawking radiation imply that nothing ever gets past the event horizon of a black hole?

According to the General Theory of Relativity, the coordinate time distance per spacetime distance traveled by a particle freely falling into a black hole gets closer and closer to $0$ as the particle ...
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2answers
83 views

Infinite Accelatation

Before I ask my question, let me just say, I know very little about particle physics and general relativity, so I may ask a obvious question or a question that makes little or no sense. Now, what ...
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0answers
36 views

Chronology protection for non-geodesic CTCs and imprisoned curves

As far as I can make out, the quantum part of the Chronology Protection Conjecture hinges on the fact that in curved space, in the semiclassical approximation, the stress energy tensor contains a term ...
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44 views

Highest symmetric non-maximally symmetric spacetime

What is the highest number of symmetries (Killing vectors) that a (4-dimensional) spacetime can have without being maximally symmetric? From what I can see, it seems to be 7 (which includes the ...
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0answers
60 views

Black Hole - Between event horizon and singularity

Dear Physics Board Users What is between the singularity and the event horizon? If the gravitation gets bigger and bigger coming nearer to a black hole, is then the gravition inside even bigger that ...
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4answers
162 views

How far apart do two objects have to be for there to be negligible force between them?

Inspired from the commentary on this question. How far apart do two objects have to be for the gravitational force between them to be negligible? By negligible I mean, that it could never be ...
2
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2answers
74 views

Can a GPS system detect the decline in the rotational velocity of the Earth?

From Wikipedia: Rotation in Angular Velocity of Earth Earth's rotation is slowing slightly with time; thus, a day was shorter in the past. This is due to the tidal effects the Moon has on Earth's ...
4
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2answers
542 views

What is the consequence of “infinite” gravitational force?

Introduction I am a mathematically minded individual. I do not intuitively comprehend physics, and as a sophomore in high school who has only taken Intro to Physics in his freshman year, I may very ...
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3answers
65 views

How and when are the relativistic corrections applied to GPS satellites?

It is known that there is a need to correct the onboard clocks to reduce the time difference from 38μs to 50ns. Where is relativity playing its role here? Why cant the clocks be simply synchronised ...
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1answer
50 views

What is the utility of ADM decomposition of the space-time metric?

I know it's one of the possibility of quantization of gravitational field's degree of freedom but it is introduced also in other situation. My question is which is the powerful of this kind of ...
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1answer
40 views

What is the difference between the expansion of space and the Alcubierre drive?

The Alcubierre drive violates causality. As far as I know the expansion of space does not. The usual explanation for why space is allowed to go FTL is that the matter doesn't move. The Alcubierre ...
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2answers
67 views

Stand on a black hole

Is there an theoretical possibility that an black hole rotates so fast that the acceleration pushing you out of the black hole is nearly equal to the gravity?
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58 views

Do quantum wave functions curve spacetime before they are measured

Do wave functions cause spacetime curvature before they are measured, or would curvature only happen upon measurement? I guess the question becomes, do quantum wavefunctions carry energy while they ...
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Why do physicists believe the “no-hair conjecture” to be true? [duplicate]

The no-hair conjecture states that a black hole is completely characterized by its mass, electric charge, and angular momentum. Most physicists take it as given. My question is, why? It implies the ...
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1answer
86 views

Does acceleration of time explain gravity (rather than the other way round)? [closed]

I have a question about interpreting (explaining, even) the general theory of relativity. A common interpretation of GR, as I understand it, is to imagine two-dimensional space represented by ...