A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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No hair theorem and black hole entropy

The no hair theorem says that black holes rapidly converge to a state that is completely described just by their mass, spin and charge. Black hole thermodynamics says that the black hole entropy is ...
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75 views

Hawking radiation (black hole evaporation) [duplicate]

I understand that one of the simplified ways of looking at Hawking radiation is a pair of virtual particles close to the event horizon (but outside of it). The particle with negative energy falls into ...
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108 views

Question on Einstein's derivation of the equation of the geodesic line?

While reading one of the original paper on general relativity written by Albert Einstein, titled the foundations of general relativity, I came across the following passage in pages 167-168, or pages ...
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76 views

What does this Hodge dual symbol $\star_3$ mean?

We know that in this $$\star {f(...)}$$ the $\star$ represents the Hodge dual. But in this: $\star_3 f(...)$ what does specifically the $\star_3$ symbol mean?
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125 views

Should all theories of gravity have Schwarzschild solution?

A consistent theory of gravity must include the Newton's classical theory of gravity as a weak field approximation. Moreover, to satisfy the experiments in the solar system, the Schwarzschild ...
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690 views

Can a metric in General Relativity, Supergravity, String Theory, etc., be asymmetric?

Why is it that all problems I encountered until now have metrics that when represented in a matrix form turn out to be symmetric? Aren't there asymmetric matrices representing some metrics?
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111 views

Tensors as multilinear maps

Sean Carrol's in his book on GR introduces tensors as a multilinear map of a set of dual vectors and vectors onto R. I usually think of tensors as a multidimensional array of numbers with fixed ...
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60 views

Can a free falling observer localize the event horizon by calculations?

I'm think that in general relativity we can always pass the one curve in one coordinate system for another coordinate system. My intuition say that the free falling observer locate the event horizon ...
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81 views

How much of General relativity follows from the invariance of $c$ and an escape velocity?

Just supposing Einstein hadn't come up with his idea of the equivalence principle, leaving him blind for a while. Would he still have been able to come up with General Relativity just using the ...
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47 views

Schwarzschild Solution Convention

In looking at the components of the Schwarzschild Metric, one finds $ g_{00} = (1 - \frac{r_s}{r})c^2 $. Wikipedia states that $r$ is measured as the circumference, divided by $2π$, of a sphere ...
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Is topology of universe observable?

There is an idea that the geometry of physical space is not observable(i.e. it can't be fixed by mere observation). It was introduced by H. Poincare. In brief it says that we can formulate our ...
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56 views

Duality and 1 forms

If a Killing vector is equal to: $$X= -\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\partial _t + \frac{\alpha}{\sqrt{2}}\partial_1.$$ But as far as I know is that the dual of a vector is a 1-form, so can I represent that ...
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116 views

If a Killing vector field is timelike, can it be set to $\partial/\partial t$?

If one has a Killing vector that turned out to be a timelike Killing vector field because of negative norm. Can we set this Killing vector field equal to $\partial/\partial t$?
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160 views

Is $ds^2$ just a number or is it actually a quantity squared?

I originally thought $ds^2$ was the square of some number we call the spacetime interval. I thought this because Taylor and Wheeler treat it like the square of a quantity in their book Spacetime ...
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1answer
45 views

Are the gravitational redshift and blueshift factors inverses of each other? [closed]

at a point in gravitational field assuming swcharzschild metric and the exact analysis. The other point in context is infinity. It would be helpful if you can provide citation/source of the ...
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0answers
59 views

Local Acceleration of an observer near a black hole

In the first page of this link https://www.math.ku.edu/~lerner/GR/Schwarzschild.pdf they calculate the magnitude of acceleration felt by an observer at $r$ from the black hole: ...
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1answer
46 views

Can someone clarify how many metrics exist that satisfy the EFEs?

As I currently understand it, there are two ways to work with the Einstein Field Equations: (1) exact solutions and (2) approximations that work under certain conditions. I also understand that ...
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2answers
368 views

What's the relationship between quantum entanglement and the relativity of time?

Apologies in advance for what may be a stupid question from a layman. In reading recently about quantum entanglement, I understood there to be a direct link between entangled particles, even at ...
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2answers
209 views

Changing vector basis in AdS$_3$

I have AdS${}_3$ given as a surface embedded in a 4 dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space $$x^2+y^2-u^2-y^2=-l^2$$ With metric: $$ds^2=dx^2+dy^2-du^2-dv^2$$ I have Killing vectors of that space ...
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227 views

Can curvature waves in f(R) theories explain gravitational lensing in cluster collisions?

The Einstein-Hilbert action leading to Einstein's equations is $$S\sim\int R \sqrt{-g}\, {\rm d}^4 x$$ There is a class of modifications of Einstein's relativity called $f(R)$ theories of gravity ...
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164 views

Geodesic Deviation between Test Particles from Gravitational Wave

I'm having trouble understanding how Carroll (Spacetime and Geometry, p.296) explains the effect of a passing gravitational wave on test particles. If we have two geodesics with tangents $\vec{U}$, ...
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70 views

Geodesic deviation

In S. Carroll Lecture Notes on General Relativity, chapter 6, pages 152-153 we have equation (6.62) $$\tag{6.62} \frac{\partial^2}{\partial t^2} S^\mu=\frac{1}{2} S^\sigma \frac{\partial^2}{\partial ...
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How does Space-Time Cloak work?

Well, scientists have achieved Spacetime cloaking to make events fully disappear. Currently, it works only for a trillionth of a second, but here's real-world scenario from linked page: In theory, ...
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Why isn't the center of the galaxy “younger” than the outer parts?

I understand that time is relative for all but as I understand it, time flows at a slower rate for objects that are either moving faster or objects that are near larger masses than for those that are ...
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50 views

Relativity and Galaxy Rotation Speed

If time travels slower nearer gravity wells, why can't the galaxy rotation speeds being faster on the outer edges than the inner areas be explained by relativity? What necessitates dark matter?
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Can a non-Euclidean space be descripted through an Euclidean space of higher dimension? So why use non-Euclidean?

If you draw a big triangle in Earth 2D surface you will have an approximated spherical triangle, this will be a non euclidean geometry. but from a 3D perspective, for example the same triangle from ...
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59 views

Can we embed 2+1 space-time of GR in a 3 Dimensional Euclidean space?

Wikipedia says that inflation is the exponential expansion of space in the early universe.I'm trying to have a physical picture of this.Given that I can't visualize 3+1 pseudoriemannian manifolds,I'm ...
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203 views

Coordinates for FLRW metric

In GR, coordinate are just a tool for us to describe the physics, they should be equivalent. However, in standard form of FLRW metric, it can be inferred that the universe is expanding, but we can do ...
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1answer
49 views

Post-Newtonian approximation for binary gravitating system

I have been studying gravitation waves radiated by a binary source. I have linearised Einstein's field equation and approximated the source to a Quadrupole moment to get the power radiated by the ...
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1answer
647 views

Suggested reading for quantum field theory in curved spacetime

I want to learn some QFT in curved spacetime. What papers/books/reviews can you suggest to learn this area? Are there any good books or other reference material which can help in learning about QFT ...
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86 views

What's the best GR book for recreational study? [closed]

I currently have four books. Hartle Schutz Cheng Carroll (lecture notes) Which one is best for me to read easily? (especially, for foreigners) Or Do you guys can give good recommendations that ...
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55 views

Norm of Killing vector field

Let us suppose we have a Killing vector field with $X^a = 1/2$ and $X^b = 1/3$ and $g_{ab}=1$ where the other $c$ and $d$ components are zero. Now we want to find its norm: The formula for finding ...
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2answers
82 views

Does the escape velocity of a black hole exceed $c$ *before* a singularity is created?

As an offshoot of the question Can we have a black hole without a singularity? I'm curious if the point of no return at which the massive object is condemned to become a singularity happens before its ...
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881 views

geometry inside the event horizon

I'm trying to understand intuitively the geometry as it would look to an observer entering the event horizon of a schwarszchild black hole. I would appreciate any insights or corrections to the above. ...
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1answer
49 views

Is this cosmological scenario possible?

Is it possible that the universe is infinitely large and contains an infinite amount of mass that is distributed in such a way that gravitational force is never infinite? If so, is it possible that ...
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58 views

How would an observer feel the Einstein Thirring Lense Effect?

The Einstein Thirring Lense Effect, also known as Frame Dragging, is what happens when cellestial bodies have rotation. It states that when a body of mass is rotating around an axis it drags space and ...
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1answer
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Naturalness of tensor fields in general relativity?

In the third chapter of the book The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time, the authors say regarding the matter fields in general relativity: These fields will obey equations which can be expressed ...
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Does the payload of an Alcubierre drive have to be on board during the preparation phase?

I was thinking about the practical aspect of using an Alcubierre drive, assuming one existed. I'm no expert, but my understanding is that, since the destination has to be in the forward light-cone of ...
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1answer
35 views

isotropy of 3-space and spacetime metric

The most general spacetime metric is given by $$ds^2=g_{\mu\nu}dx^\mu dx^\nu=c^2dt^2+g_{0i}dtdx^i-g_{ij}dx^i dx^j$$ Why does the second term said to violate isotropy of 3-space? It is true that, ...
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1answer
216 views

At what rate does light 'bend' around the surface of the earth?

Since the g force of earth is 9.8 m/s*2 does that mean light 'drops' at that rate as it travels past earth? Or is general relativity a lot more complex than that?
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760 views

Effect of space time relativity on the age of the universe?

So we all heard about the twins paradox to explain einstein's time space relativity. Wikipedia Quote :" In physics, the twin paradox is a thought experiment in special relativity involving identical ...
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1answer
324 views

Our Universe Can't be Looped? [duplicate]

With reference to the Twin-Paradox (I am new with this), now information of who has actually aged comes from the fact that one of the twins felt some acceleration. So if universe was like a loop, and ...
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1answer
595 views

How will the Twin Paradox become, for Time Dilation, if no acceleration was ever involved?

I think one catch in Twin Paradox was about the big acceleration that can turn back the traveling twin from light speed outward bound, to become light speed inward bound. What if there is strictly no ...
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4answers
129 views

Twin paradox where the twins start at different locations

Suppose we have this scenario with twins A and B: 1) Instead of the twins starting at the same location, let's say the twins start out some distance apart, in the same reference frame. 2) The ...
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3answers
332 views

Twin paradox - observers counter orbiting Earth

Imagine three observers - one (A) stationary on the surface of Earth (latitude 0 deg) and two others orbiting the planet in the same circular equatorial orbit just in the opposite direction. When the ...
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2answers
196 views

Twin paradox with two intertial frames in general relativity

I assume the twin paradox from special relativity is well known. I wish to focus on the apparent symmetry of the problem: both observer seems to move away from each other, and then come back. Yet, the ...
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Symmetrical twin paradox

Take the following gedankenexperiment in which two astronauts meet each other again and again in a perfectly symmetrical setting - a hyperspherical (3-manifold) universe in which the 3 dimensions are ...
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Twin paradox on a cosmic scale

I am referring to yet another version as the classical twin paradox. In my version the moving apart of the twins is entirely induced by space expansion between them and they move apart each other at ...
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How is the classical twin paradox resolved?

I read a lot about the classical twin paradox recently. What confuses me is that some authors claim that it can be resolved within SRT, others say that you need GRT. Now, what is true (and why)?
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109 views

Why does $\frac{d\tau}{d\sigma} = L$?

I am given a (3+1)-dimensional spacetime that has the line element \begin{equation} ds^2 = -\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)dt^2 + \left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)^{-1} dr^2 + r^2 d\phi^2 \end{equation} ...