A theory that describes how matter produces and responds to the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
85 views

Photons emitted at the event horizon?

While looking through the questions, a came across a section about black holes. I immediately though; what would happen if an atom is orbiting a black hole and emitted a photon perpendicular to the ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

What are the relativistic effects of expanding spacetime?

This is a question I've been mulling over for a while and I'm hoping someone here can point me in the right direction. Sorry if it's a bit of a novice question. For the record, I don't fully know GR, ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

2 Event Horizons come into contact [duplicate]

Just a question out of curiosity, what would happen if the event horizons of 2 black holes of the same mass were to come into contact? Would both gravitational accelerations be canceled where the ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

Mass of a black hole

I know that if a star collapses into a volume with radius less or equal to the Schwarzschild radius $r_s=\frac{2GM}{c^2}$ then a black hole is created and it has the same mass of the star that gave it ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

What is the energy of a black hole?

This might be a stupid question but given Einstein's general theory of relativity $E = m c^{2} $ what is the energy of a black hole? Isn't the mass of a black hole infinite? Wouldn't that be infinity ...
5
votes
1answer
281 views

What is the entropy of the universe today?

What's the entropy of the universe today? How does one go about calculating this? I've heard the statement that black holes account for the bulk of the entropy in the universe today, but don't know ...
10
votes
1answer
413 views

Can masses move in 2+1 gravity?

I would like to understand basic concepts of the general relativity in 2+1 spacetime. As far as I know, GR predicts that such a spacetime is flat everywhere except for the point masses which create ...
157
votes
13answers
12k views

How does gravity escape a black hole?

My understanding is that light can not escape from within a black hole (within the event horizon). I've also heard that information cannot propagate faster than the speed of light. It would seem to ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

'hypersurface orthogonal' component of covariant derivative of normal vector

I believe that answer to my question is rather trivial but I can't seem to get my head around it. In context of ADM formulation of gravity (or any other differential geometry context, I guess) the ...
2
votes
2answers
205 views

What is the meaning of space-time curvature?

What is the difference between the Space-time curvature and Space curvature?
7
votes
2answers
307 views

Assuming that the Cosmological Principle is correct, does this imply that the universe possess an empirically privileged reference frame?

OK...before everyone blasts this with references to the relativistic invariance of the physical laws, time dilation, etc let me add some context. Also, I am an amateur with an interest in physics, so ...
15
votes
3answers
1k views

Wouldn't angular momentum of a binary star system decrease?

Consider a binary star system, as these stars go around one another they would emit gravitational waves. Since, the graviton is a spin 2 particle. Wouldn't the angular momentum of the stars decrease? ...
1
vote
2answers
315 views

Does GR really allow superluminal movement?

In this video, Michio Kaku says "...general theory of relativity, where it is possible, we think, that you might be able to go faster than the speed of light..." Does GR really allow ...
10
votes
1answer
387 views

Causal and Global structure of Penrose Diagrams

What kind of global and causal structures does a Penrose diagram reveal? How do I see (using a Penrose diagram) that two different spacetimes have a similar global and causal structure? Also, I ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Can weakness of gravity explore new dimensions

Since gravitational force is weakest force out of the four fundamental fources at the microscopic level. Is it possible that gravitational force is strong in a particular direction at a new ...
1
vote
1answer
412 views

Minimal vs. Non-minimal coupling

What is the difference between Minimal vs. Non-minimal coupling in General Relativity? A brief introduction to Minimal Coupling in General Relativity could be useful too.
5
votes
0answers
113 views

Why is the Ricci tensor diagonal for isotropic spacetime?

I'm reading Zee's Einstein Gravity in a Nutshell and while calculating the Ricci tensor for FRW spacetime he claims that because the spacelike slices of constant $t$ are rotationally invariant, the ...
4
votes
2answers
122 views

What is the notion of a spatial angle in general relativity?

Is there a notion of spatial angles in general relativity? Example: The world line of a photon is given by $x^{\mu}(\lambda)$. Suppose it flies into my lab where I have a mirror. I align the mirror ...
3
votes
1answer
283 views

The Spin Connection

Why do we need to introduce the spin connection coefficients $\omega_{\mu \space \space b}^{\space \space a} $ in General Relativity? To me, they just look (mathematically) like the Christoffel ...
3
votes
0answers
50 views

Rigid rectangle in Schwarzschild

Say I build a perfect rectangle. Side lengths $l_1$ and $l_2$ and perfect right angles. I am on earth and the metric is given by the Schwarzschild metric. Setting $dt=0$ leads to the spatial ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Metric for infinite straight cosmic string

A string theory question on my general relativity problem set: Metric is given as $$\mathrm{d}s^2 = -A(r)\mathrm{d}t^2 + B(r)\mathrm{d}r^2 + r^2 \mathrm{d}\theta^2.$$ a) Solve the vacuum equations ...
3
votes
2answers
287 views

Restriction of a Lagrangian

I'm wondering if anyone could help me with the following questions. Let $M$ be the Minkowski spacetime, given $f\in C^{\infty}(M) ; f(m)=x^{0}(m)$, with $\{x^{\mu}\}$ being a global Cartesian ...
12
votes
6answers
7k views

Why can't light escape from a classical black hole?

Photons do not have (rest) mass (that's why they can move at speed of "light"). So, my question is how the gravity of classical$^1$ black hole can stop light from escaping? -- $^1$ We ignore ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Instabilities in the CDMT

Could anyone explain or refer to references on why the CDMT f(R) gravity model suffers from Instabilities any why the sign of ${\mu}^{4}$ matters.
0
votes
1answer
118 views

How to calculate spatial distance in space-time?

Pinning two test particles at two different points in space, how can I calculate their spatial distance, when the geometry is given by the Schwarzschild metric? Let's say particle 1 is pinned at ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Does the equivalence between inertial and gravitational mass imply anything about the Higgs mechanism?

For example: the role it might play in a theory of quantum gravity (ie causing space-time curvature)? I realize that inertial mass can result from binding energy alone. Has the equivalence principle ...
1
vote
2answers
123 views

Stress-energy-momentum tensor

In Wald's General Relativity, he writes on pg 61 For an observer with 4-velocity $v^a$, the component $T_{ab}v^a v^b$ is interpreted as the energy density, i.e. the mass-energy per unit volume, as ...
0
votes
0answers
83 views

Does non-matter energy curve spacetime? [duplicate]

I know that matter (mass) curves spacetime, but do other forms of energy do the same? I.e. is matter the only form of energy that curves spacetime?
11
votes
5answers
1k views

What does a frame of reference mean in terms of manifolds?

Because of my mathematical background, I've been finding it hard to relate the physics-talk I've been reading, with mathematical objects. In (say special) relativity, we have a Lorentzian manifold, ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Calculating Hubble Radius using relativistic effects

I am trying to calculate the Hubble Radius, or the distance from which an object will recede from an observer at the speed of light. I initially tried using $v=H_0d$ which gives $d=1.424\times10^{26}$ ...
17
votes
8answers
1k views

Is it foolish to distinguish between covariant and contravariant vectors?

A vector space is a set whose elements satisfy certain axioms. Now there are physical entities that satisfy these properties, which may not be arrows. A co-ordinate transformation is linear map from a ...
0
votes
1answer
148 views

Geodesic devation on a two sphere

So the geodesic deviation equation gives the relative acceleration between two geodesics in motion. But given a pair of geodesic (let's say on the two sphere) that start at the equator, separated by ...
6
votes
1answer
131 views

Could dark energy make a large black hole less black?

Theoretically, if a black hole grew to a huge scale such that the effect of dark energy was large, could the black hole become 'normal' space again (i.e. no horizon or singularity)? What I'm trying ...
13
votes
1answer
458 views

What are the local covariant tensors one can form from the metric?

Normally in differential geometry, we assume that the only way to produce a tensorial quantity by differentiation is to (1) start with a tensor, and then (2) apply a covariant derivative (not a plain ...
4
votes
6answers
2k views

Surely space-time Curvature does not explain gravity, it just describe its effects?

In special relativity co-moving objects see the other's 4-velocity as being only temporal. When they move relative to each other they see the other's 4-velocity has rotated so that it points less in ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

velocity in inertial and nontial frames

I got confused about the difference between the last term of both pictures. In the first one, we have w x r, but in the second we have w x r underlined. Does anyone have a better explanation? They ...
2
votes
4answers
185 views

Can we think of gravity as space itself moving?

So if you move through space with a constant acceleration you experience longer time dilation than when you're at rest, but you also experience the same time dilation when you're under the effect of ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Field equations in extended EH-GHY action. Is Schwarzschild a solution?

When taking the EH action, $$S_{EH} = \frac{1}{16\pi G}\int_M d^4x \sqrt{-g}R$$ and making a small variation in the metric while ignoring boundary terms, we obtain $$\delta S_{EH} = \frac{1}{16\pi ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Does the universal expansion affect the gravitational constant?

If the universe was not expanding, would gravity be stronger? since the expansion happens everywhere and can overcome gravity at long distances? If not, then are there any changes that would happen to ...
1
vote
0answers
88 views

Can a magnet or a magnetic field push gravity? [closed]

I have been asking around at my school and at the high school and at EWU but no one can answer this question: can a magnet or a magnetic field push gravity?
1
vote
0answers
57 views

SPEED of LIGHT as photons reach black holes [duplicate]

As photons reach a black hole and begin fall in - is their speed increased as they go down (like a vacuum cleaner does to dust).
2
votes
0answers
51 views

General covariance and global Poincaré algebras

Reading an article (page 7) I read this: Just as ordinary general covariance may be regarded as the local gauge symmetry corresponding to the global Poincare algebra and local gauge invariance ...
4
votes
2answers
161 views

Hilbert action's invariance under general coordinate changes

In an article, when considering invariance of the Hilbert action under a general coordinate change this formula appears for how the metric changes ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Is the Hilbert-Felber model of repulsive gravity correct?

This theory states that at relative velocities exceeding 3^-0.5 c, gravitational repulsion ensues. The relevant papers are on arXiv by Franklin Felber. Here's one of them ...
0
votes
3answers
129 views

Speed of light originating from a star with gravitational pull close to black-hole strength?

Imagine you have a star which is on the brink of turning into a black hole. Lets say it is infinitely close to become a black hole, but not there yet. Since there is no event horizon, but a great ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Noticing that Newtonian gravity and electrostatics are equivalent, is there also a relationship between the general relativity and electrodynamics?

In classical mechanics, we had Newton's law of gravity $F \propto \frac{Mm}{r^2}$. Because of this, all laws of classical electrostatics applied to classical gravity if we assumed that all charges ...
7
votes
3answers
457 views

Geometric interpretation of Electromagnetism

For gravity, we have General Relativity, which is a geometric theory for gravitation. Is there a similar analog for Electromagnetism?
0
votes
2answers
154 views

Do electromagnetic fields gravitate?

It's well known that electromagnetic fields contains energy but do they gravitate ? When we talk about the composition of the universe it's now accepted that the 74 % is dark energy , the 22 % is ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Poincaré symmetry and linearized gravity

When working with linearized gravity, is Poincaré symetry assumed to be the symmetry of space-time?