A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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what is the difference between a blackhole and a point particle

Theoretically, What is the difference between a black hole and a point particle of certain nonzero mass. Of-course the former exists while its not clear whether the later exists or not, but both have ...
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2answers
861 views

Black Hole Singularity and String Theory

This question arises in a somewhat naive form because I am largely unfamiliar with String Theory. I do know that it incorporates higher space dimensions where I shall take the overall dimensionality ...
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1answer
62 views

Can you recover a spacetime from its null geodesics?

So, I know that you can learn a lot about a spacetime from its causal structure, but can one completely recover the metric of a spacetime, just knowing the equations for the null geodesics in it? If ...
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2answers
133 views

Speed of light and warp drives in general relativity

Velocities can be a tricky thing in general relativity. A cool concept seemly consistent with the Einstein field equations) is an Alcubierre drive, described by the Alcubierre metric. However, I ...
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2answers
393 views

Which of these two textbook equations of geodesic deviation is correct?

My previous question Geodesic deviation on a 2-sphere - is this the right track? got shot down as “off topic”, so I'm having a second stab at it. Misner et al's Gravitation (p34) gives the geodesic ...
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2answers
209 views

Huygen's principle in curved spacetimes

Does Huygen's principle hold in even dimensional (2m+1,1) curved spacetimes, or are there certain necessary conditions for it to hold? In other words, if I have Cauchy data for a field satisfying the ...
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1answer
156 views

Where are the time dilatational effects of orbital motion and gravitational acceleration equal?

Nearly four years ago, upon hearing of the observation of time dilation in two optical atomic clocks at an elevation one metre apart, due to acceleration towards earths centre of gravity by Chou, C. ...
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1answer
170 views

Do alternate theories for Dark Matter (like MOND) explain it's effect on gravitational lensing?

For a long time, I was sceptical about the evidence for dark matter. To me, it seemed like a pretty big leap to make when we have no idea whether or not our current models of gravity should apply ...
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0answers
224 views

Wald problem 4 of chapter 4

I'm trying to derive equation 4.4.51 in Wald's GR book (the second order correction in $\gamma$ term for the Ricci tensor): where $g=\eta+\gamma$. So ...
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1answer
391 views

What are the general relativity equations for relativistic constant acceleration?

At constant acceleration in special relativity, the time differs for a stationary observer and the astronaut. see the following article for an in-depth explanation: Relativistic Rocket However, when ...
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1answer
975 views

Equation for null geodesic around schwarzschild metric?

I'm trying to find the path of a photon around the Schwarzschild black hole, given its initial conditions. After much tribulation, I've basically given up on solving the equations by myself. I just ...
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2answers
462 views

Excluding big bang itself, does spacetime have a boundary?

My understanding of big bang cosmology and General Relativity is that both matter and spacetime emerged together (I'm not considering time zero where there was a singularity). Does this mean that ...
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1answer
991 views

General relativity and the conservation of momentum

I'm trying to understand the conservation of momentum in general relativity. Due to the curvature of space-time by matters and energy, the path of a linear motion appears to be distorted. Therefore ...
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4answers
720 views

Time inside a Black hole

If time stops inside a black hole, due to gravitational time dilation, how can it's life end after a very long time? If time doesn't pass inside a black hole, then an event to occur inside a black ...
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1answer
162 views

How can photons exert gravity if they are wave-like?

As a reference, see this question: Does a photon exert a gravitational pull? It turns out the answer is "Yes" -- but this does not seem consistent with light being wave-like. I am imagining a ...
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2answers
180 views

Gravitational distortion of an object's diameter, at a distance,

Does the curvature of space-time cause objects to look smaller than they really are? What is the relationship between the optical distortion and the mass of the objects?
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3answers
662 views

Are the principles of space-time homogeneity and Isotropy independent of one another?

Einstein in deriving the Lorentz transformations, used the principles of space-time homogeneity and Isotropy. Does space-time isotropy follow from space-time homogeneity or are they completely ...
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2answers
432 views

About space-time and its four dimensions

I explained to someone I know about General Relativity (as much as I know). He said that he didn't see how it could be correct. He argued: How is 4-dimensional space-time space different to ...
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2answers
953 views

Zero divergence of energy-momentum tensor and gravitational energy

Trying to teach myself general relativity and have just hit yet another confusion. I'm reading that in curved spacetime the energy-momentum tensor has zero divergence, ie ...
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2answers
300 views

Gravitational wave energy

Electromagnetic energy can be related to it's frequency via $E=h\nu$. Is there a comparable relationship between gravitational wave energy and frequency?
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1answer
64 views

Unruh effect and relative acceleration

This is how I understand the Unruh effect: if a person (say, Bob) is moving with acceleration $a$ in his spaceship, then he will see an apparent event horizon around him--that is, the vacuum will ...
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2answers
142 views

Why doesn't a global frame of reference exist for GR?

I only have at best a layperson's familiarity with GR, so forgive me if I am asking a basic question, but I have heard that in GR, we cannot have a global frame of reference, that is a frame of ...
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2answers
113 views

If you fall in a black hole, when do you go past the event horizon? [duplicate]

Say I fall into the event horizon of a black hole. As I cross the black hole, I would appear to outside onlookers to freeze in time, and would never move from that point again. In my perspective, time ...
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1answer
68 views

Local translations in curved spacetime

A global Poincare transformation on a scalar field induces $$\delta(a, \lambda)\phi(x) = [a^{\mu}+\lambda^{\mu\nu}x_{\nu}]\partial_{\mu}\phi(x). \tag{11.46}$$ In curved spacetime we replace $a^{\mu} ...
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2answers
113 views

Is Moon really rotating about its axis?

Wikipedia says yes but on Newtonian arguments. From general relativistic point of view Moon is not rotating but moving along geodesic trajectory. And like parallel transport of a vector (pointing to ...
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1answer
146 views

Where is a closed form also exact?

I'm not very familiar with exterior derivatives. I've some trouble following argument (which is a part of a proof that if the Riemann tensor vanishes, $R^{\,\rho}_{\;\,\sigma \mu \nu}=0$, iff there ...
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0answers
364 views

what are the direct real life applications of general relativity and quantum physics [closed]

What are the direct real life applications of general relativity other than nuclear technology? What I meant was, was there any technology developed based on general relativity that can benefit ...
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2answers
249 views

Does the total mass of an isolated object include the mass stored in its gravitational field?

Since neither the object nor its field could exist without the other, it would seem strange not to include the field energy as part of the object. But how exactly does the accounting go? How is the ...
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2answers
139 views

Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely?

As the title suggests, Can the effects of a person's mass upon the local gravitational field be detected and measured remotely? I am aware any mass produces and effects gravity but couldn't find ...
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0answers
76 views

Naked singularity and extendable geodesics [duplicate]

I'm currently trying to understand the notion of a naked singularity. After consulting books by Wald and Choquet-Bruhat, it seems that for a naked singularity one must have that the causal curves can ...
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3answers
289 views

Vacuum-ether and spacetime

In the past you could not give an explanation for various phenomena in which there was an action at a distance, like magnetism or gravity, that occurred in a vacuum; For this reason, ether was ...
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4answers
305 views

Equivalence principle question

I understand the equivalence principle as "The physics in a freely-falling small laboratory is that of special relativity (SR)." But I'm not quite sure why this is equivalent to "One cannot tell ...
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4answers
178 views

How do black holes accrete mass?

Thanks to time dilation, a distant observer watching a man fall in to a black hole will only see him asymptotically approach the event horizon. So how do black holes ever get bigger?
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1answer
290 views

What's the difference between the equivalence principle and curvature of spacetime?

Calculating using the equivalence principle only accounts for half the deflection of light, whereas the other half is from curvature of space-time. But isn't the equivalence principle the same thing ...
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1answer
483 views

Einstein's Explanation for gravity vs. Newtonian

I was trying to understand the Einstein's explanation for gravity (gravitational force), and while I am able to understand why two moving masses will be attracted, due to the curving of the space, I ...
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2answers
2k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
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2answers
199 views

Can the implications of dark energy be used to bridge the gap between Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity?

Can the findings of the Physics Nobel Laureates of 2011, namely the overpowering existence of dark energy (vacuum energy) have any implications in the quest the combine Quantum Mechanics and General ...
2
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1answer
180 views

Violation of Lorentz symmetry on cosmological distances

This question is about the domain of validity of Lorentz symmetry. As far as I know, general relativity is a generalization of special relativity. Does that mean that Lorentz symmetry is violated on ...
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0answers
774 views

Apparently John Nash found a way to replace Einstein's theory of relativity days before crash [closed]

True story, John Nash told his friend that he revised Einstein's theory of relativity to account for quantum gravity days before dying in the car crash. This guy worked on manifold theory big time (in ...
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1answer
89 views

Equivalence principle for test fields

My question is very simple. We all know that, for a test particle(classical) in a gravitational field, the motion is only determined by the geodesic lines(let's forget about the initial conditions for ...
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1answer
155 views

Why a timelike geodesic maximizes path length?

I'm studying some GR and my book says that in Pseudo-Riemannian manifolds geodesics may even maximize the path locally. That's what happen to the timelike geodesics, for example. My first question: Is ...
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3answers
141 views

Why can't light escape a blackhole? [duplicate]

Gravity attracts objects which have mass right. We know that light is massless so why does a black hole's gravity attract light?
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1answer
68 views

Real-world evidence that non-massive entities (or even: antiparticles), and their behaviors, are sources of gravity?

The theory of general relativity tells us that non-massive entities, and their behaviors, are possible sources of gravity. Mass isn't needed, the theory says. What's the real-world evidence that ...
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2answers
117 views

How can gravitions exist without violating GR? [duplicate]

How can gravitions exist without violating GR, since GR says that gravity is curvature in space-time.
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1answer
79 views

White Hole Formation [duplicate]

How does a white hole form in nature if it were to exist? No knowledge of general relativity or advanced mathematics but doing a researching a physics project and need a basic explanation.
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0answers
150 views

Textbook disagreement on geodesic deviation on a 2-sphere

Apologies if I have this completely wrong (and for the general long-windedness). I've searched online but can't find anything helpful/relevant. I'm trying to use the geodesic equation ...
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4answers
295 views

Space-time curvature creates gravity or is it (could it be) vice-versa too?

Mass (Energy) creates space-time curvature and thus it forms the reason for gravity. Can it be vice-versa too? Like, mass created gravitational field, gravitational field created space-time curvature? ...
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1answer
332 views

GPS Satellite - Special Relativity

I'm going through an old relativity assignment, and I've been asked to calculate the time dilation for a satellite which orbits the earth in 12 hours at 26000km from the surface, and travels at a ...
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1answer
202 views

Conservation of energy and momentum via the continuity equation in asymmetric time and space translation

I am confused about energy and momentum conservation, time and space translation symmetry, and the continuity equation. Suppose we have a mass $m$ in inertial space far from any gravitational ...
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0answers
152 views

Stationary and Static [duplicate]

I have some confusion about the concept of stationary and static. A metric $g$ is called stationary if there is a time like Killing vector $K$. $g$ is called static is further HSO (hyper surface ...