A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

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Does a body curve spacetime at higher velocities? [duplicate]

Suppose we have two objects where the distance over time decreases. Now, as I understand it, general relativity says that we can observe the Universe from the perspective of both objects an get a ...
3
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2answers
184 views

From affine space to a manifold?

One of the several definitions of an affine space goes like this. Let $M$ be an arbitrary set whose elements are called points, let $\mathcal{V}$ be a vector space of dimension $n$, and let ...
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1answer
2k views

Time dilation - Earth & Jupiter [duplicate]

I have this doubt after watching Interstellar movie :) Lets assume I am in Jupiter. (I know it is a gas planet, full of hydrogen and helium, has extreme pressure etc. Lets please ignore those facts ...
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90 views

Relative time dilation in Schwarzschild metric

Let's say we use the Schwarzschild metric to model the curved spacetime around a planet of mass $M$ and radius $R_0$. One clock $A$ is hovering at distance $R_A$ > $R_0$ with the help of rockets, a ...
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4answers
494 views

Interpretation of a singular metric

I'm interested to find out if we can say anything useful about spacetime at the singularity in the FLRW metric that occurs at $t = 0$. If I understand correctly, the FLRW spacetime is a combination ...
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79 views

Manifold for Schwarzschild and Bertotti-Robinson

In short: what is the manifold in discussion for Schwarzschild metric $$ ds^2 = -(1-\frac {2M}r)dt^2 + \frac1{1-\frac{2M}r} dr^2 + r^2 (d\theta^2 + \sin^2 \theta d\phi^2)$$ and Bertotti-Robinson ...
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2answers
125 views

How close can an observer approach the black hole in an unpowered flyby without falling into it?

In classical mechanics by choosing the right trajectory you can approach a planet arbitrarily closely, if there is no atmosphere or anything to slow you down, you can approach the surface then fly ...
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1answer
68 views

Integration and Differentiation of Proper Time

My question concerns the general relativity setting. Integration: Proper time is defined by $$\tau = \int_P\sqrt{g_{\mu\nu}dx^\mu dx^\nu}$$ but happens when $g_{\mu\nu}\neq 0$ for $\mu\neq \nu$ ? For ...
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1answer
636 views

Gravity is curved geometry: A fact of nature or model-dependent interpretation?

We are regularly taught in high-schools and universities that, according to General Relativity (GR), gravity is nothing but a manifestation of space-time curvature (which, in its turn, is caused by ...
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26 views

Using Special Relativity in Uniform Circular Motion [duplicate]

Can one utilize the formulas of Special Relativity in uniform circular motion? The radial component of the object does accelerate, but sometimes we are just interested in its tangential speed. Here ...
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3answers
362 views

Entire Universe's Momentum

I was thinking about the definition of the conservation of momentum, which says that momentum is conserved unless outside forces are acting on the system, and I was wondering that if the system is the ...
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1answer
80 views

Are Asimov's short duration spacetime “jumps” feasible? [closed]

In books of science fiction (Asimov) I saw the fancy idea of a "jump" over a space-time interval, (i.e. at superluminal velocity and for a VERY SHORT time). The result was landing in another region of ...
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4answers
656 views

Coulomb's Law in the presence of a strong gravitational field

I was under the impression that the $1/r^2$ falloff of various forces were because of the way the area of a expanding sphere scales. But that strict $1/r^2$ falloff would only be globally true in a ...
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1answer
87 views

Non-geodesic circular orbit? [closed]

From N. Straumann, General Relativity Exercise 4.9: Calculate the radial acceleration for a non-geodesic circular orbit in the Schwarzschild spacetime. Show that this becomes positive for ...
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0answers
92 views

Is the metric-induced topology relevant at all in a (psuedo) Riemannian manifold? [duplicate]

A (pseudo) Riemannian manifold is a tuple: $$(M,g)$$ where $M$ is a smooth manifold (in particular, a topological space with an atlas) and $g$ is a (pseudo) Riemannian metric tensor. It is apparent ...
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2answers
82 views

Can Einstein's constant explain expansion?

I read somewhere that Einstein or Newton believed that the universe was completely static, where it neither expanded nor contracted, but simply remained fixed. It was concluded that due to attraction ...
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0answers
97 views

Free fall coordinates/Fermi (normal) coordinates

It makes sense intuitively given the equivalent principle, and I've seen many times it stated, that for a free fall (geodesic) path in an arbitrary spacetime, we can choose our coordinate system to ...
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36 views

How does an observer in arbitrary state of motion assign numbers to events in a flat spacetime?

In a flat spacetime, there is an inertial observer, who assigns events coordinates in a usual fashion: Placing a clock everywhere and synchronize them. From his POV, the other observer is moving in ...
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1answer
132 views

Time derivative of time-translation Killing vector

I'm working with the spherically symmetric, static black hole metric. In the problem I'm working on, I'm told that $K$ is the time-translation Killing vector, $\frac{\partial}{\partial t}$ or $K = (1, ...
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2answers
281 views

Spacetime diagram of a collapse of a rotating star

There is a well-known "standard" spacetime diagram (Kruskal and Penrose) for the collapse of a spherically symmetric star to a Schwarzschild black hole (for example here, or here in EF), which stands ...
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4answers
227 views

Derivation of Kerr metric, is there any reference?

In studying general relativity, many text deals with the derivation of Schwarzschild metric starting from generic metric form. After that impose static, spherical symmetry and obtain the desired ...
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1answer
34 views

Why is $p\cdot u_{\mathrm{obs}} = -E$ valid in curved spacetime for a stationary observer?

An observer stationed at a fixed Schwarzschild radial coordinate R near a spherical star of mass M observes a photon moving radially away from the star and measures its energy to be E. What are the ...
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1answer
47 views

A particular coordinate transformation of a metric tensor

So, this was a problem set question for my GR class due yesterday, and I can't for the life of me solve it, it seems I am missing something very trivial. Either the given answer is wrong, or I am. ...
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4answers
195 views

Is there a peak gravitational force between bodies?

Suppose Object A is exerting gravitational force on Object B. Object A increases in mass, and so increases in volume, increasing the gravitational force on Object B. But, since mass occupies space the ...
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1answer
34 views

Different between $\mu$ and $T_{00}$ in perfect fluid solutions?

In the perfect fluid solution for general relativity, you get $$T_{ab} = u_a u_b (\mu + p) - g_{ab} \, p$$ I've seen varying descriptions of what $\mu$ is, and some places describe it as the local ...
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30 views

entropy-infomartion correlation at preliminary universe?

according to the theory of cosmic inflation after Alan Guth, the information should have travelled 100 times the speed of light at the very beginning after the big bang. -when we talk about ...
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3answers
163 views

Time slowed by gravity

If time moves more slowly on Earth (due to our proximity to a gravitational body) than for someone orbiting Earth in a spaceship, yet the opposite occurs in the frequently cited "twin paradox" of the ...
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93 views

Can some components of metric be Finslerian while the others be Riemannian?

A Finsler metric reduces to a Riemann metric in case it loses its dependence on velocities. Now, my question is this: Can we have a Finsler metric in which some components of the metric have velocity ...
5
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2answers
87 views

Interpreting the Kretschmann scalar

How do you interpret the Kretschmann scalar (in general relatvity)? What can you tell from it? The Kretschmann scalar is defined as $$K = R_{abcd} R^{abcd} $$ where $R_{abcd}$ is the Riemann ...
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1answer
125 views

A test for virtual particles by measuring gravity fluctuations possible?

Ok to begin I will begin by talking briefly about my discussions with my Quantum Mechanics (specializes in Particle physics) professor and my Cosmology Professor (who studies particle physics with ...
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2answers
178 views

Is four-current a vector or a vector density?

According to MTW, $$F^{\alpha\beta}{}_{;\beta} = 4\pi J^\alpha$$ and we can infer that the four-current must be an ordinary vector field because the left side is tensorial. But Wikipedia says that ...
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1answer
43 views

In general relativity, do light/time behave as in free space if the net force of gravity is zero?

I mean, if photons/particles in question are on lines equidistant from two bodies of mass (while passing them), does time look the same to them as it would without the bodies of mass? Or is time ...
2
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1answer
159 views

Can I practically demonstrate Gravitational Time Dilation by spinning a wheel very fast? [duplicate]

In an attempt to demonstrate gravitational time dilation, I was curious if it were practical to mount a clock to a fast spinning wheel, with the centripetal acceleration of the wheel being equivalent ...
2
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1answer
94 views

The relationship between the structure of spacetime and the existence of spinor field?

We all know that the existence of spinor fields implies that spacetime must be time-orientable. Thus that spacetime is time-orientable is a necessary condition for existence of spinor fields. Geroch, ...
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1answer
58 views

If you are not given a metric, which one is more fundamental: a vector or a covector? [closed]

If we do not have the metric $g_{\mu\nu}$ for a given spacetime, are vectors $x^\mu$ more fundamental than covectors $x_\mu$ or vice versa? Why? (if the metric were given we could just raise/lower ...
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2answers
65 views

Gravitational force of several massive bodies, from the viewpoint of general relativity

According to Wald's GR, "absolute gravitation force has no meaning". The text goes on to describe two cases: one where a gravitational force can be defined, and one in which it cannot. I'd like to ...
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95 views

Computing the Ricci Tensor for a Spherically Symmetric Spacetime

For a homework question, we are given the metric $$ds^2=dt^2-\frac{2m}{F}dr^2-F^2d\Omega^2\ ,$$ where F is some nasty function of $r$ and $t$. We're asked to then show that this satisfies the Field ...
2
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1answer
131 views

Variation of the metric with respect to the metric

For a variation of the metric $g^{\mu\nu}$ with respect to $g^{\alpha\beta}$ you might expect the result (at least I did): \begin{equation} \frac{\delta g^{\mu\nu}}{\delta g^{\alpha\beta}}= ...
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7answers
4k views

Why does rotation simulate gravity if motion is relative?

In Einstein's theory of relativity, if motion is truly relative, then why would somebody in a rotating space station experience (artificial) gravity? I mean, I get why they experience gravity IF the ...
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0answers
53 views

Can a gravitational wave produce oscillating time dilation?

I was reading about gravitational waves and about laser based detectors. I also read this. As mentioned in the answer, when ever there is a deformation in spacetime, doesn't it also create a minute ...
3
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1answer
82 views

A true singularity at $t=0$, coordinate independent Big Bang

Consider a flat Robertson-Walker metric. When we say that there is a singularity at $t=0$, clearly it is a coordinate dependent statement. So it is a "candidate" singularity. In principle there is ...
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2answers
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Is there a binary black hole system in the middle of the galaxy?

We have observed gravity effects from black holes in the center of galaxies, but galactic centers are dusty so we can’t tell if it’s one black hole or two black holes in a binary system in there. A ...
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1answer
216 views

Lever “paradox”?

Let's say we have a lever with two weights A and B with the same mass overlapping at the midpoint. Suppose they start to separate with each other at the speed of light simultaneously. From our point ...
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3answers
85 views

All geodesics are inextendable?

I think the title is true, because geodesics has a tangent vector with a constant length parametrized by an affine parameter. Probably, it is easier to think about timelike or spacelike geodesics. ...
20
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4answers
3k views

What does this depiction of a black hole in the movie Interstellar mean?

I was expecting a whirlpool in 3D and the matter glowing from friction as it nears the center, as I expected a event horizon to be negligible visually. How does this depiction work? How big is the ...
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39 views

Is time dilation a mechanical slowdown only? [duplicate]

I've recently read about the time dilation occurs at very high speeds. But I'm really wondering if it is just a mechanical slowdown of the clock only? What if we use clocks that does not use moving ...
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7answers
430 views

Can a ultracentrifuge be used to test general relativity?

With today's ultracentrifuge technology, they can spin so fast that the sample can be subjected to accelerations of up to 2 millions Gs. That is equivalent to two solar masses. Has someone tried to ...
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1answer
55 views

How does Gravity behave at high energy?

At super high energy, Strong Force becomes weak to act like Electroweak Force (Grand Unification Theory; hand-waving version 2.2). Well, I am NOT trying to find Theory of Everything with this ...
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2answers
131 views

Can a body ever experience acceleration this strong?

Using the Schwarzschild radius formula, I approximated the Sun's Schwarzschild radius to be $3\text{ km}$. Now assuming I have a body (not a human body) which is at a distance of $10\text{ km}$ from ...
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110 views

Covariant Derivative Chain rule? [duplicate]

I want to prove that a covariant derivative of a vector $A^{\mu}(x(z))$ at the point $x(z)$ in general would be defined as $$D_z ...