1
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0answers
38 views

General covariance and global Poincaré algebras

Reading an article (page 7) I read this: Just as ordinary general covariance may be regarded as the local gauge symmetry corresponding to the global Poincare algebra and local gauge invariance ...
3
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0answers
73 views

Why is general relativity considered to be a gauge theory? [duplicate]

I have studied the first five chapters of Carroll's book (up to the Schwarzschild solution). I see similarities to the Yang-Mill theories such as the covariant derivative to account for curvature in ...
0
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0answers
53 views

Doubt on Kaluza-Klein theories by Bailin/Love

I've started reading a review written by D. Bailin and A. Love about Kaluza/Klein theories: Bailin, D., & Love, A. (1987). Kaluza-Klein theories. Rep. Progr. Phys., 50(9), 1087. ...
2
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0answers
64 views

gravitational field as a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance [closed]

can someone help me prove that a gravitational field corresponds to a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance. i know about the tensor formulation of GTR and the gauge invariance in electrodynamics ...
4
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1answer
156 views

How would one expect a massive graviton to behave?

Typically, adding a mass $m$ to a gauge boson causes the boson to only be able to travel over a finite distance, $L\sim m^{-1}$, limiting the range of the associated force. For example, photons ...
4
votes
3answers
245 views

Why gauge theories have such a success?

[This question was inspired by a identical question asked on a other forum] Note that we may morally include general relativity in the gauge theories. We may have several (some are deliberately ...
3
votes
1answer
282 views

Degrees of freedom of the graviton versus classical degrees of freedom

I have a puzzle I can not even understand. A graviton is generally understood in $D$ dimensions as a field with some independent components or degrees of freedom (DOF), from a traceless symmetric ...
4
votes
2answers
612 views

Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
5
votes
1answer
342 views

Counting degrees of freedom for gravitational waves as a gauge field

Sean Carroll has a new popularization about the Higgs, The Particle at the End of the Universe. Carroll is a relativist, and I enjoyed seeing how he presented the four forces of nature synoptically, ...
7
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1answer
556 views

Diffeomorphisms, Isometries And General Relativity

Apologies if this question is too naive, but it strikes at the heart of something that's been bothering me for a while. Under a diffeomorphism $\phi$ we can push forward an arbitrary tensor field $F$ ...
13
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4answers
741 views

To which extent is general relativity a gauge theory?

In quantum mechanics, we know that a change of frame -- a gauge transform -- leaves the probability of an outcome measurement invariant (well, the square modulus of the wave-function, i.e. the ...
1
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1answer
204 views

observable quantities are gauge invariant?

I have a simply question, that is whether spatial velocity is gauge invariant. It is seems that under a infinitesimal coordinate transformation the velocity is just transform as other vectors, and it ...
5
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3answers
286 views

Could general relativity and gauge theories in principle be covered in one course?

It's always nice to point out the structural similarieties between (semi-)Riemannian geometry and gauge field theories alla Classical yang Mills theories. Nevertheless, I feel the relation between the ...
6
votes
2answers
122 views

Torsion and gauge invariant EM kinetic term

Everytime I hear about adding torsion to GR, something struggles me: how do you create a kinetic term for the electromagnetic field that is still gauge-invariant? One of the consequences of torsion is ...
10
votes
1answer
498 views

argument about fallacy of diff(M) being a gauge group for general relativity

I want to outline a solid argument (or bulletpoints) to show how weak is the idea of diff(M) being the gauge group of general relativity. basically i have these points that in my view are very solid ...
3
votes
2answers
367 views

Diff(M) and requirements on GR observables

This question is kind of inspired in this one: Diff(M) as a gauge group and local observables in theories with gravity The conundrum i'm trying to understand is how is derived the (quite) ...