0
votes
1answer
79 views

General relativity: gauge fixing

In his lectures professor Hamber said that the metric tensor is not unique, just like the 4 vector potential is not unique for a unique field in electrodynamics. Since the metric tensor is symmetric, ...
5
votes
2answers
143 views

Questions about the degree of freedom in General Relatity

I'm confused about the number of degrees of freedom in General Relatity. There are two ways to count it. However, they are contradictory. For simplicity, we consider vacuum solution. First, ...
5
votes
3answers
304 views

Is there any relationship between gauge field and spin connection?

For a spinor on curved spacetime, $D_\mu$ is the covariant derivative for fermionic fields is $$D_\mu = \partial_\mu - \frac{i}{4} \omega_{\mu}^{ab} \sigma_{ab}$$ where $\omega_\mu^{ab}$ are the spin ...
5
votes
1answer
116 views

Equivalency of Gauge Conditions

How is the Lorenz gauge condition $\partial_\mu \overline{h}^{\mu \nu}=0$ equivalent to the harmonic gauge condition $\Box x^\mu=0 $?
2
votes
0answers
47 views

General covariance and global Poincaré algebras

Reading an article (page 7) I read this: Just as ordinary general covariance may be regarded as the local gauge symmetry corresponding to the global Poincare algebra and local gauge invariance ...
3
votes
0answers
75 views

Why is general relativity considered to be a gauge theory? [duplicate]

I have studied the first five chapters of Carroll's book (up to the Schwarzschild solution). I see similarities to the Yang-Mill theories such as the covariant derivative to account for curvature in ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

gravitational field as a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance [closed]

can someone help me prove that a gravitational field corresponds to a spin 2 particle using gauge invariance. i know about the tensor formulation of GTR and the gauge invariance in electrodynamics ...
4
votes
1answer
183 views

How would one expect a massive graviton to behave?

Typically, adding a mass $m$ to a gauge boson causes the boson to only be able to travel over a finite distance, $L\sim m^{-1}$, limiting the range of the associated force. For example, photons ...
4
votes
3answers
348 views

Why gauge theories have such a success?

[This question was inspired by a identical question asked on a other forum] Note that we may morally include general relativity in the gauge theories. We may have several (some are deliberately ...
4
votes
3answers
527 views

Degrees of freedom of the graviton versus classical degrees of freedom

I have a puzzle I can not even understand. A graviton is generally understood in $D$ dimensions as a field with some independent components or degrees of freedom (DOF), from a traceless symmetric ...
7
votes
3answers
946 views

Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
5
votes
1answer
541 views

Counting degrees of freedom for gravitational waves as a gauge field

Sean Carroll has a new popularization about the Higgs, The Particle at the End of the Universe. Carroll is a relativist, and I enjoyed seeing how he presented the four forces of nature synoptically, ...
8
votes
1answer
635 views

Diffeomorphisms, Isometries And General Relativity

Apologies if this question is too naive, but it strikes at the heart of something that's been bothering me for a while. Under a diffeomorphism $\phi$ we can push forward an arbitrary tensor field $F$ ...
13
votes
4answers
929 views

To which extent is general relativity a gauge theory?

In quantum mechanics, we know that a change of frame -- a gauge transform -- leaves the probability of an outcome measurement invariant (well, the square modulus of the wave-function, i.e. the ...
1
vote
1answer
216 views

observable quantities are gauge invariant?

I have a simply question, that is whether spatial velocity is gauge invariant. It is seems that under a infinitesimal coordinate transformation the velocity is just transform as other vectors, and it ...
5
votes
3answers
300 views

Could general relativity and gauge theories in principle be covered in one course?

It's always nice to point out the structural similarieties between (semi-)Riemannian geometry and gauge field theories alla Classical yang Mills theories. Nevertheless, I feel the relation between the ...
6
votes
2answers
135 views

Torsion and gauge invariant EM kinetic term

Everytime I hear about adding torsion to GR, something struggles me: how do you create a kinetic term for the electromagnetic field that is still gauge-invariant? One of the consequences of torsion is ...
11
votes
2answers
592 views

argument about fallacy of diff(M) being a gauge group for general relativity

I want to outline a solid argument (or bulletpoints) to show how weak is the idea of diff(M) being the gauge group of general relativity. basically i have these points that in my view are very solid ...
4
votes
2answers
396 views

Diff(M) and requirements on GR observables

This question is kind of inspired in this one: Diff(M) as a gauge group and local observables in theories with gravity The conundrum i'm trying to understand is how is derived the (quite) ...