2
votes
1answer
48 views

What is the energy of a black hole?

This might be a stupid question but given Einstein's general theory of relativity $E = m c^{2} $ what is the energy of a black hole? Isn't the mass of a black hole infinite? Wouldn't that be infinity ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Does non-matter energy curve spacetime? [duplicate]

I know that matter (mass) curves spacetime, but do other forms of energy do the same? I.e. is matter the only form of energy that curves spacetime?
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Positive Mass Theorem [duplicate]

I'm a third year maths undergrad doing a project on minimal surfaces. However I'm really struggling to understand what the PMT is trying to explain? Could anyone help explain this (as simply as ...
0
votes
1answer
89 views

Physical interpretation of $Q^i = \partial _\nu T^{i \nu}$

I'm trouble with exercise 1.8 of Carroll's Space-Time and Geometry: If $\partial_\nu T^{\mu \nu} = Q^\mu$, what physically does the spatial vector $Q^i$ represent? Use the dust energy momentum ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Energy difference in General Relativity

Why exactly are absolute energies important in General Relativity, unlike for example EM where only energy differences matter?
2
votes
2answers
190 views

Matter and anti-matter collision energy problem

From Beyond Einstein, by Michio Kaku and Jennifer Thompson, Chapter 13, Antimatter : Dirac, also focused on the fact that Einstein's equation $E=mc^2$ wasn't totally true. (Einstein was aware that ...
1
vote
2answers
245 views

Negative potential energy of gravity

Does the negative potential energy in the gravitational field have to be considered in calculating the total mass of the system in question (because of $E=mc^2$)? If so it seems to me that the ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Energy Functional

I am a graduate student in pure mathematics, during my study on Ricci Flow I faced some functional known as energy functional. For example Einstein-Hilbert functional is called an energy functional, ...
9
votes
1answer
185 views

Positivity of Total Gravitational Energy in GR

I read the following statement in the introduction to an article: Over the last 30 years, one of the greatest achievements in classical general relativity has certainly been the proof of the ...
2
votes
3answers
344 views

Is the Schwarzschild black hole unphysical?

To obtain the Schwarzschild metric from Einstein equations of general relativity, we suppose that the energy density is a distribution : $$ \rho (\vec{r}) = M \delta(\vec{r})$$ The Schwarzschild ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the total energy of the universe constant?

If total energy is conserved just transformed and never newly created, is there a sum of all energies that is constant? Why is it probably not that easy?
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Is the law of conservation of energy still valid?

Is the law of conservation of energy still valid or have there been experiments showing that energy could be created or lost?
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Any examples of negative ADM energy solutions with WEC but not DEC satisfied?

Any examples of negative ADM energy solutions with weak energy condition (WEC) but not dominant energy condition (DEC) satisfied? Witten's proof of the positive energy theorem requires the dominant ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Are neutrinos affected by gravity?

Layman here, but EE and BS physics. I know that light is affected by gravity. But are neutrinos? During the collapse of a star into a neutron star, as the electrons join protons to form neutrons ...
7
votes
2answers
634 views

Have red shifted photons lost energy and where did it go?

I think the title says it. Did expansion of the universe steal the energy somehow?
3
votes
3answers
393 views

storing energy (as mass)

When chemical energy is released mass is reduced, if only by a negligible amount. Presumably that's true for all energy. And presumably that works in reverse as well: storing energy involves an ...
1
vote
1answer
766 views

Is the curvature of space around mass independent of gravity?

Is the curvature of space caused by the local density of the energy in that area?Could gravity be a separate phenomenon only arising from the curvature of space? For instance if the density of energy ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Proof that Energy Momentum Tensor of Scalar Field Theory satisfies Weak Energy Condition

It's a question on Sean Carroll's Spacetime and Geometry, where we are supposed to prove that the energy momentum tensor of scalar field theory satisfies Weak Energy Condition (WEC). The energy ...
6
votes
2answers
379 views

Does rotational energy have effect on gravity/metric?

Intuitively, if energy can be stored in rotational motion, it has to obey $E=mc^2$. Does rotation of typical stellar-sized objects - BHs, pulsars, binaries - have measurable effect on their overall ...
1
vote
1answer
308 views

Using mass of the observable Universe to estimate an energy equivalent

For quite some time now, physicists have been able to estimate the mass of the observable universe. Reportedly it's around $10^{50} \:\mathrm{kg}$. There is also general relativity, which states ...
0
votes
1answer
408 views

Does the Big Bang need a cause? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: on causality and The Big Bang Theory Asking here in layman's terms.. When theoretical physicsists discuss the origin of our Universe, the wider consensus appears to be ...
6
votes
3answers
298 views

How can you tell if a critical energy density is actually a black hole?

Here's a question inspired by Edward's answer to this question. It's my understanding that the average energy density of a black hole in its rest frame is $\rho_\text{BH}(A)$, a function of surface ...
15
votes
4answers
638 views

Redshifting of Light and the expansion of the universe

So I have learned in class that light can get red-shifted as it travels through space. As I understand it, space itself expands and stretches out the wavelength of the light. This results in the light ...