15
votes
3answers
258 views

Comparing predictions and reality for the gravitational attraction due to light beams

While doing some on-the-side reading, I stumbled across this question: Do two beams of light attract each other in general theory of relativity?. Great question and a great, easily understandable ...
7
votes
2answers
194 views

Do photons and cosmic rays radiate energy through gravitational waves? If not, why not?

Due to the mass-energy equivalence, both matter and EM radiation bend spacetime, and both are capable of forming singularities (black hole, white hole/kugelblitz). In light of this, why do photons ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Problem with relativity of acceleration

In this answer http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/92833/36977 John said that acceleration is not relative in the general theory of relativity. But this is a problem: as we all know, accelerating ...
0
votes
2answers
132 views

Do electromagnetic fields gravitate?

It's well known that electromagnetic fields contains energy but do they gravitate ? When we talk about the composition of the universe it's now accepted that the 74 % is dark energy , the 22 % is ...
4
votes
1answer
105 views

What is the effect of gravity on gamma rays?

I read an article about a Gamma Ray burst linked to a black hole. How does high gravity fields affect gamma rays?
19
votes
2answers
617 views

Gravitational slingshot of light using a black hole/massive object

Wikipedia has this page on gravity assists using planets. In some cases this effect was used to accelerate the spacecraft to a higher velocity. This diagram shows this in a very oversimplified manner. ...
1
vote
1answer
152 views

Retarded potential in gravitational field?

Is there a retarded potential concept in gravitational field similar to electromagnetic radiation?
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is light described by a null geodesic?

I'm trying to wrap my head around how geodesics describe trajectories at the moment. I get that for events to be causally connected, they must be connected by a timelike curve, so free objects must ...
15
votes
4answers
1k views

Does a charged particle accelerating in a gravitational field radiate?

A charged particle undergoing an acceleration radiates photons. Let's consider a charge in a freely falling frame of reference. In such a frame, the local gravitational field is necessarily zero, ...
2
votes
1answer
244 views

Experimental proof of gravitational redshift of light

Has the gravitational red shift been proven for electromagnetic waves only or also for a single photon?
9
votes
2answers
286 views

Effect of gravitation on light

Einstein predicted that the gravitational force can act on light. This was verified in one solar eclipse that light from a star near to the sun's disc bent due to Sun's gravity as predicted. Since ...
15
votes
4answers
637 views

Redshifting of Light and the expansion of the universe

So I have learned in class that light can get red-shifted as it travels through space. As I understand it, space itself expands and stretches out the wavelength of the light. This results in the light ...
27
votes
4answers
2k views

Do two beams of light attract each other in general theory of relativity?

In general relativity, light is subject to gravitational pull. Does light generate gravitational pull, and do two beams of light attract each other?
2
votes
3answers
549 views

Light bending by black holes

In the center of our milky way, it is assumed that a black hole exists with a mass of $\approx 4\times 10^6$ times our sun's mass. How much light bending (in degrees) would arise for stars that are in ...
6
votes
1answer
442 views

Low frequency electromagnetic waves in General Relativity

I am becoming familiar with the Geometric Optics approximation in General Relativity which (to summarise) says that EM waves follow null geodesics under the geometric optics approximation. In the ...