2
votes
1answer
52 views

Time Energy symmetry in General Relativity (not asking about energy conservation)

In General Relativity is there a TE symmetry similar to CPT symmetry in the Standard Model ? It's pretty easy to understand that by flipping charge and parity you merely get a time reversed equivalent ...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Is topology of universe observable?

There is an idea that the geometry of physical space is not observable(i.e. it can't be fixed by mere observation). It was introduced by H. Poincare. In brief it says that we can formulate our ...
3
votes
2answers
104 views

Frame dragging — is there a “non-tiny” example?

Now. As I understand it, in fact, the earth (10^25 kg) creates a very small, very tiny, frame dragging effect. Indeed, we have measured this using satellite experiments. So, the Earth (10^25 kg) ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Avoiding Pseudo-tensors when addressing global conservation of energy in GR

Discussions about global conservation of energy in GR often invoke the use of the stress-energy-momentum pseudo-tensor to offer up a sort of generalization of the concept of energy defined in a way ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

How has the age of the Universe been derived from the observations made by the Planck mission?

The parameters of $\rm\Lambda CDM$ model have been determined to an amazing high precision from the measurements made by the Planck mission. In particular, the Hubble "constant" (the value of Hubble ...
1
vote
0answers
64 views

Maybe photon energy is constant as the Universe expands?

This is a question following on from my previous post Time-like Killing vector in FRW metric? For simplicity I take the spatially flat FRW metric in cartesian co-ordinates given by: $$ds^2 = -dt^2 + ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Lee Yang force and cosmology

The text I am reading (Stars and Relativity by Ya. B. Zel'dovich) discusses the possible existence of a repulsive force proportional to total baryon number. At the time of the book's publication it ...
3
votes
0answers
39 views

Should a radiation-filled Universe be scale invariant?

Imagine a spatially flat Universe, without cosmological constant, filled only with EM radiation. As Maxwell's equations without charges or currents are scale invariant then should this Universe be ...
26
votes
4answers
3k views

Why does a flat universe imply an infinite universe?

This article claims that because the universe appears to be flat, it must be infinite. I've heard this idea mentioned in a few other places, but they never explain the reasoning at all.
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Measuring proper distance using a light beam

I wonder if someone can help me with the following problem. I send a light beam to a distant galaxy which then bounces back to me. I measure the travel time of the lightbeam using say a light clock ...
4
votes
1answer
76 views

Pressure and Density Using a General Lagrangian

Given a lagrangian of a form: \begin{equation}\mathcal{L}=f(\phi,\partial_{\mu}\phi\partial^{\mu}\phi)\end{equation} where $f$ is a function, I need to derive pressure and density in a FLRW universe ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Angular diameter distance in an inhomogeneous universe?

Computing the angular diameter distance $D_{A}$ is a well known academic exercise in an homogeneous Universe. But now suppose that we are in an inhomogeneous Universe and that I am interested in ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

Does a hydrogen atom today have same mass as a hydrogen atom in the future?

Does an atom of hydrogen today have the same rest mass energy as an atom of hydrogen a billion years in the future? Standard cosmology seems to tacitly make this assumption. But surely one can only ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive field, what would be the properties of this field's quanta?

If non-zero cosmological constant interpreted as a repulsive field, what would be the properties of the excitation of such field, i.e. the particle which serves as the field's quantum? What would be ...
6
votes
2answers
146 views

Killing vectors in flat FLRW metric

I have the flat FLRW metric, $$ ds^2=-dt^2+a(t)^2(dx^2+dy^2+dz^2) $$ and a geodesic $\gamma(s)=(t(s),x(s),y(s),z(s))$ with parameter $s$. Two of the Killing vectors of the metric are $ \partial_x$ ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

Time-like Killing vector in FRW metric?

The spatially flat FRW metric in cartesian co-ordinates is given by: $$ds^2 = -dt^2 + a^2(t)(dx^2 + dy^2 + dz^2)$$ As I understand it there are Killing vectors in the $x$, $y$, $z$ directions implying ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Infinite Redshift [closed]

My text says that the signals emitted at a physical size of horizon $l_{H}(t)$ come to an observer at time $t$ with an infinite redshift. How do I show this mathematically? My approach is as follows: ...
5
votes
2answers
186 views

Proving one field equation leads to the other [closed]

Assume that the universe is homogenous and isotropic, and the following equation holds: \begin{equation}R_{00}-\frac{1}{2}g_{00}R=8\pi GT_{00}; \space \space \nabla_{\mu}T^{\mu 0}=0.\end{equation} ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Reconciling “The Big Crunch” with the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics

Assume "The Big Crunch" scenario (the universe will collapse to a singularity). In this case, I think of the entire universe as an isolated system; in the "Big Crunch" scenario, it seems to me gravity ...
4
votes
1answer
124 views

Non-stationary spacetime

What is an example for a spacetime that is non-stationary that is considered as a description of something in nature? So far all the spacetimes I encounted have always been stationary ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy?

What is intrinsic gravitational entropy? Does it have to do with dark matter or coarse graining in the universe? Is it unique to general relativity, or there are predictions from quantum mechanics as ...
3
votes
1answer
122 views

Time slowing down vs. universe expanding

Einstein said that it is impossible to distinguish between the effect of gravity and acceleration (so if you stand in an accelerating elevator in space it would not feel any different than if you were ...
5
votes
1answer
97 views

Differentiating the gravitational redshift and the cosmological redshift?

If general relativity accounts for a redshift, independent of inflation, how can we still know that inflation is viable? Moreover, how do we differentiate the the gravitational redshift and the ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Luminosity distance from angular diameter distance

Consider that I know the cosmological angular diameter distance at a given redshift : $$D_{A}\left(z\right)=\frac{x_{object}}{\theta_{observer}}$$ Is there a general formula to compute the ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Angular and luminosity distance in general?

Consider a non-Friedmannian Universe in which we know the trajectories of photons, ie in which we know null geodesics $\left(\eta, x^{1}, x^{2}, x^{3}, a, z\right)$ where : $\eta$ is the conformal ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

Dark Matter and Modified Gravity

Could someone please explain briefly or refer me to an article or manuscript that shows how f(R) modified gravity theories can be used to explain the problem of Dark Matter, particularly Galaxy ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Isotropy of Space

Weinberg writes in his Cosmology text "Likewise,isotropy requires the mean value of any three-tensor $t_{ij}$ at $x=0$ to be proportional to $\delta_{ij}$ and hence to $g_{ij}$, which equals ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Friedmann Equations with varying G?

If Newton's constant $G$ actually varies with cosmological time $t$ would a suitably modified form of the Einstein field equations: $$G_{\mu \nu} + \Lambda g_{\mu \nu} = \frac{8 \pi G(t)}{c^4} T_{\mu ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

Is the cosmological redshift caused by the Planck mass increasing?

The standard explanation for the cosmological redshift is that photons emitted from far away galaxies have their wavelengths lengthened as they travel through the expanding Universe. But perhaps the ...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

Is energy conserved in general relativity? Does $\nabla_aT^{ab}=0$ represent the conservation of energy and momentum?

For example, the radiation dominated cosmology, the energy density of radiation is propotional to $a^{-4}$ and the volume is propotional to $a^3$, where $a$ is the scale factor. So the total energy ...
0
votes
0answers
124 views

How come that an Infinite universe will collapse under gravity?

In this PSE post the issue is about the stability of an infinite universe under Newtonian gravity. Here I'will drop the Newtonian constraint because we know of the finite speed of interactions and I ...
10
votes
2answers
255 views

The difference between The Dilaton and The Radion?

I have read this question on the Dilaton, but I am a little confused with the distinction between the Dilaton and the Radion. I definitely have the feeling that these two scalar fields are different ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Instabilities in the CDMT

Could anyone explain or refer to references on why the CDMT f(R) gravity model suffers from Instabilities any why the sign of ${\mu}^{4}$ matters.
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Calculating Hubble Radius using relativistic effects

I am trying to calculate the Hubble Radius, or the distance from which an object will recede from an observer at the speed of light. I initially tried using $v=H_0d$ which gives $d=1.424\times10^{26}$ ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Does the universal expansion affect the gravitational constant?

If the universe was not expanding, would gravity be stronger? since the expansion happens everywhere and can overcome gravity at long distances? If not, then are there any changes that would happen to ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Null Geodesics in Einstein Universe

I am currently taking a course in General Relativity, and I've hit a bit of a roadblock with a homework assignment. We are given the metric for Einstein's universe to be (forgive me, this is meant to ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Metric to describe an expanding spacetime from coordinates reflecting the perspective of a local observer

The FLRW metric describes the metric expansion of spacetime from the perspective of comoving coordinates. Given the way this metric is usually formulated, comoving distances stay constant, and the ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

What's the meaning of the age of the universe?

I'm not asking about how we worked backward from an expanding universe to the age of the big bang, but rather what is the meaning of time in a near infinitely dense point in the context of general ...
0
votes
1answer
139 views

What is the solution of general relativity for our universe? [duplicate]

So I just finished off learning quantum mechanics and special relativity. I just realized that in general relativity, there is Einstein field equation which must be solved in order to talk about ...
3
votes
1answer
161 views

What is the minisuperspace Lagrangian for gravity plus a scalar field?

In this paper by Sean Carroll and Grant Remmen, in equation (11) they write a Lagrangian of the form $$\boxed{\mathcal{L}=3a\left(k-\dot{a}^2\right)+a^3\left[\frac{1}{2}\dot\phi^2-V(\phi)\right]}$$ ...
2
votes
0answers
91 views

General formula to compute the redshift (first order perturbations)

Consider an expanding universe with the following metric in conformal time/co-moving coordinates: ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Stress-Energy Tensor

As of recent, I've been doing a bit of self education in GR, equipped with a working knowledge of the key elements of the differential geometry in GR, and in looking at the Einstein-Rosen bridge, I ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

How is the scale factor from the FLRW equation used with Volume?

I'm trying to put a spreadsheet together that shows the co-moving volume of the universe from the time soon after the Big Bang through the present and then as predicted into the future. I am pretty ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Is conformal time observable?

The standard FRW metric with cosmic time is $$ ds^2 = -dt^2 + a^2(t)(\gamma_{ij}dx^i dx^j),$$ and we can measure $t$ as the proper time for comoving observers. Thus it makes sense to talk about the ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Meaning of $k$ in Sachs-Wolfe formula for angular power spectrum

I've seen the formula for the angular power spectrum of the CMB written as $$C_\ell = \frac2\pi \int\left|\Theta_\ell(k) \right|^2 k^2dk, $$ where $\Theta_\ell(k)$ is the temperature contrast at a ...
0
votes
3answers
167 views

Space and the size of infinity [duplicate]

If you could build a spaceship and keep travelling in one direction, what would finally happen? One answer is that you would never ever reach the end. But this sounds purely platonic space and comes ...
2
votes
2answers
728 views

Can Flow of time become still?

According to theory of time dilation, flow of time slows down significantly at the speed of light.Is there any conditions practically or theoretically when flow of time is reduced to zero means it ...
7
votes
2answers
233 views

Do photons and cosmic rays radiate energy through gravitational waves? If not, why not?

Due to the mass-energy equivalence, both matter and EM radiation bend spacetime, and both are capable of forming singularities (black hole, white hole/kugelblitz). In light of this, why do photons ...
0
votes
1answer
135 views

Would a collapsing Universe have the density of water?

I understand that the typical density of the super massive black hole is close that of the water. It is also my understanding that this density is not true matter density because the volume used to ...
1
vote
0answers
75 views

Modelling a matter dominated universe collapsing into a black hole

With the FLRW equations we can get solutions for a matter dominated closed universe in which the finale is an ultimate collapse, but this is only in terms of $a$ (the scale factor) and $t$ (time) and ...