A law in Classical Electromagnetism and Newtonian Gravity.

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Is there an analogous Gauss' law which is applicable for a gravitational field?

Consider the Earth to be a flat infinite plane having linear mass density equal to the mass density of the actual earth. Can there be an analogous Gauss' law that can give the gravitational field ...
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2k views

How to choose Gaussian surfaces while solving problems?

I have a doubt regarding this problem: Two large identical flat metal plates are placed parallel to one another, seperated by a small distance compared to their linear size. One plate is given a ...
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758 views

Newtonian gravity equation in a 2 dimensional world [duplicate]

I am wondering if my line of thought is correct - and thus the resulting answer to the problem above would be correct. As we know the gravitational force (of two point masses) is given by $$F = ...
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1answer
137 views

Behavior of the electric field on boundary surfaces

Consider this picture. Integrating over this infinitesimal box gives the following equivalencies: $$\int_{\Delta V} d^3r~{\rm div} \vec{E}(\vec{r}) = \int_{S(\Delta V)} d\vec{f} \cdot ...
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Electric field inside and outside a metallic hollow sphere

1) It is known that inside a metallic hollow sphere it will not experience outside electric field because of the charge separation of electrons and holes at the surface of sphere and creating an equal ...
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Electric potential of sphere

(a) I am a little confused about this part. The point at A to B isn't radial. The electric field is radially outward, but if I look at the integral $$\int_{a}^{b}\mathbf{E}\cdot d\mathbf{s} = ...
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Confusion regarding gauss law

Gauss law states that flux due to net electric field on a Gaussian surface is charge enclosed/permittivity. Lets take a spherical Gaussian surface with +q charge at centre. We can simply calculate the ...
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Gauss' Law and Electric Field Close to a Ball

So I've learned about Gauss' law and I have something in my head. Why does electric field that is very close to a ball is not close to infinity. Take a look at this image: As we can see, if we make ...
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Symmetry arguments and plane sheet of charge [duplicate]

The electric field due to a infinite plane sheet of charge is given by $\sigma/\epsilon_o$. Now could we have deduced by symmetry that the electric field's magnitude won't depend on distance?
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What are the reasons for accepting Coulomb's law? [duplicate]

I read the Coulomb's first memoir on Electricity and Magnetism (Louis L. Bucciarelli english translated version), and found it to contain only three trials (as complained by many) to reach the ...
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In Newton's gravity, is the inverse square law related to the fact that our Universe has (apparently) 3 dimensions? [duplicate]

I read, long ago, a book, whose title I can't remember but I think the author was Carl Sagan. In the book was saying that gravity follows the inverse square law because of our Universe was 3 ...
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68 views

Is Gauss electric flux law valid in all coordinate systems?

The derivation of Gauss electric flux is as follows : $$\iint{\vec{E}}\cdot{\vec{dS}}=\iint E \, dS \cos\theta \, .$$ The projection of infinitesimal area on the surface $\vec{dS}$ on the radial ...
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How do you know when you need to use distributions to represent charge densities? [closed]

I tried to solve a problem using Gauss' law in the following way. Let's assume we have a spherical shell of radius $R$ with a charge $Q$ being homogenously distributed on its surface. I am trying to ...
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Electric field from time varying charge density

Inside a cylinder of infinite length in $z$ axis, there is charge density $ ρ = cos(βz -ωt)$. I want to find the electric field and as far as i can understand we will get a radial component of $E$. ...
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1answer
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How can I apply to the differential form of Gauss' Law? [closed]

I'm trying to learn Maxwell's equations but I got stuck. I couldn't understand the usage of the differential form of the Gauss' law. How can it be applied to questions? For example, let's say there is ...
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Electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length with Gauss' Law

I'm confused with the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length. I know that we can use the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two ...
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1answer
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Finding electric field between overlapping surfaces [closed]

The problem is: A sphere with radius R is centered at the origin, an infinite cylinder with radius R has its axis along the z axis, and an infinite slab with thickness 2R lies between the planes ...
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insulator based gauss law questions

My book is incredibly scarce on insulator based Gauss law questions. Conductors seem to handle themselves pretty simply. Here's a question I'm working on that isn't part of my book. where the radii ...
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Electric field due to a solid sphere of charge

I have been trying to understand the last step of this derivation. Consider a sphere made up of charge $+q$. Let $R$ be the radius of the sphere and $O$, its center. A point $P$ lies inside the ...
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468 views

What does it mean that a magnetic field's flux vanishes through any closed surface?

I'm reading the Britannica guide to Electricity and Magnetism, and I came across the following quote: A fundamental property of a magnetic field is that its flux through any closed surface ...
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1answer
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Help me understand Gauss law

Suppose I have the following, the gaussian surface is the drawing in the middle. So charge enclosed is zero, and then eletric field must be zero since the area of the gaussian surface is not zero. ...
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631 views

Electric Flux - What is the point?

Electric flux is a defined quantity that is proportional to the no. of field lines passing through a given area element for a given electric field. It is not proportional to the relative density of ...
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144 views

Divergence of conservative electric field

I have a little doubt about the following: according Gauss law in the form of Maxwell's equation, we know that: $$ {\rm div} (D)~=~ \rho(v) $$ This just tells us that the electric field has nonzero ...
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Electric field between 2 parallel plates

The question state that 2 large parallel plates are a distance $d$ apart and the field at $d/2$ is $E$ if the distance between the plates are reduced to $\frac{d}{2}$ what is the field strength ...
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63 views

Gauss law in gravitation

Is it possible to use Gauss's law of electromagnetism, (The net electric flux through any closed surface is equal to $1⁄\epsilon$ times the net electric charge enclosed within that surface.) to ...
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102 views

Using Gauss's law (differential form) on an infinite line of charge

I just read about Gauss's law in differential form and how to compute divergence. I worked out the $1/r^2$ field and got zero as expected! I was very happy. Then I thought the infinite line of charge, ...
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173 views

Inverse Square Law and extra space dimensions

Newton's famous Inverse Square Law says that in $n=3$ dimension of space, force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between a source and a target. I understand that for higher ...
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998 views

Why does Gauss's law work for a charge off center in a spherical surface?

CASE 1: Consider an enclosed spherical surface with a charge $q$ at its centre. From Gauss' law we can say that the flux through this sphere is $q/\epsilon_0$. CASE 2: The charge is inside but off ...
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Electric Flux is zero

When is the Electric Flux zero through a closed surface? I know that if number of field lines entering is equal to leaving then it is true. Which I think is always true for a closed surface. So can ...
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342 views

Gauss's law… if the integral defining $\boldsymbol{E}$ diverges?

I have been told (here) that, under particular conditions, the electric field produced by a charge present in space $D$, defined by ...
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231 views

Gauss' law in differential form and electric fields

I know Gauss' divergence theorem, according to which $$\iiint_D\nabla\cdot\boldsymbol{F}\text{d}x\text{d}y\text{d}z=\iint_{\partial D}\boldsymbol{F}\cdot\boldsymbol{N}_e\text{d}\sigma$$ where $D$ is a ...
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86 views

Paradox in electrostatics in relation to Gaussian surfaces?

I have encountered something that is very confusing. My problem is this. I am assuming two infinite cubical Gaussian surfaces sharing a common side. One of the cubes contains a charge $q_1$ at a ...
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3k views

Zero divergence of Electric field

I'm trying to rigorously derive the integral form of Gauss's law from Coulomb's law and the divergence theorem. Arrive at $$ \oint\limits_{\partial V} E\cdot da = \begin{cases} \frac ...
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Charge inside a sphere

Suppose I have a sphere of radius $r$ with all the charge residing on the surface, distributed uniformly i.e. charge density $\sigma$ is constant. I want to find the electric field created by this ...
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Electrostatic field in a Dielectric equations misbehaving

Equation 1: $\int{\vec{E}.\vec{ds}} = \int\frac{\rho_{free} + \rho_{bound}}{\epsilon_0} dv$ (Gauss's Law) Equation 2: $\int{\vec{D}.\vec{ds}} = \int\rho_{free} dv$ (Gauss's Law) , but $\vec{D} = ...
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Gauss Law for Magnetism,Non Instantaneous Field Propagation

Is the magnetic force instantaneous? And, are all field lines established simultaneously? Otherwise, for example, the field line marked 'L' will take longer time to propagate than the ones above it, ...
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141 views

Why is the flux 0? I don't understand this concept

! Why does it say that the flux due to q_2 and q_3 through S is 0? Doesn't it contain a nonzero charge q_1? Does anyone also know the difference between "no charge" vs "net charge is 0"? My book ...
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41 views

Is Gauss law still true in dielectric material?

In vacuum we have $$\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E} = \frac {\rho}{\varepsilon_0}.$$ Can we still use this formula when there's dielectric material in space? Where $\rho$ is total charge density.
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Is there an underlying reason why some forces are inversely proportional to the square of the distance? [duplicate]

This is the first time I'm studying those subjects (I'm still in high school) and my teacher couldn't give me an answer. I'm referring specially to Newton's law of gravitation and Coulomb's law of ...
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67 views

Proving charge on outer surface of parallel plate capacitor must be zero

If we have two conducting plates, with charge $Q$ and $-Q$, why is the charge on the outer surfaces of each conductor zero? I've been trying to wrap my head around the problem. Firstly, don't excess ...
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88 views

How does a point charge interact with a Gaussian surface?

A spherical Gaussian surface encloses a point charge $q$. The point charge is moved to to a point away from the center of the sphere. Does the electric field at a point on the surface change? ...
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1answer
48 views

Why is it true that Laplace's equation does not hold within the sphere in this case?

Find the average potential over a spherical surface of radius $R$ due to a point charge $q$ located inside. (In this case Laplace's equation does not hold within the sphere) This is a question ...
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75 views

Regarding the proof of Gauss's law

I know that this question has already been asked multiple times but I´m still not getting on the mathematical details behind the answers... So I hope that this question doesn´t get closed. First I ...
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116 views

Is there something similar to Gauss's Law For Gravity in General Relativity?

In Newtonian Physics there is an equation that for the Gravitational Flux of an object known as Gauss's Law For Gravity. Gauss's Law for Gravity describes the number of Gravitational Field Lines ...
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69 views

Why can center of mass be used in calculating gravity?

Why can gravitational forces be based on the center of mass. Due to the fact that gravity is related to the square of the distance should not the gravitational sum of every particle exceed the force ...
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1answer
95 views

Electric field between capacitors [closed]

A parallel-plate capacitor consists of two parallel, conducting plates of area $A$, separated by a distance $d$. Each carries a charge of magnitude $Q$; positive on one, negative on the other. ...
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118 views

Is the electric field at a single point inside a charged sphere zero?

Many physics textbooks say, Gauss' law shows that the electric field inside a sphere with uniform charge distribution on the surface equals zero. What I want to know is, do they mean total, ...
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101 views

Electric field of a plate with homogenous charge density

As an example for Gauß Law's application, one can find the calculation of an electric field of a plate with homogenous charge density in nearly every textbook: $$E = \frac{\sigma}{2\epsilon_0}$$ I do ...
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question about Gauss law

If I have an infinite plate with the surface charge of sigma. I know that my electric field is constant $2\pi\sigma$ (using Gauss's law). If I build the Gaussian surface above the plate the charge ...
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where does the term half in the formula of electrostatic potential energy comes from?(system of point charges)

Electrostatic potential energy stored in a system of point charges (from wikipedia) The electrostatic potential energy $U_E$ stored in a system of N charges q1, q2, ..., qN at positions r1, r2, ...