A law in Classical Electromagnetism and Newtonian Gravity.

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What is the difference between electric charge and electric flux?

What is the difference between electric charge and electric flux? According to my knowledge electric flux is nothing but electric charge enclosed by the closed surface.
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Does gravity weaken by the square of the distance because the energy is dispersed over the square of the distance [duplicate]

The area of a circle is $\pi r^2$ if you increase $r$ the area will increase by the square so if this area was of energy and you increase the area it is dispersed you would expect its energy to weaken ...
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1answer
50 views

Is the charge of an ion evenly distributed?

This question relates to: Gauss' law and ions? Is the charge distribution in an ion spherically symmetric due to quantum mechanical effects or do we assume it when using Gauss's law, as in the ...
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1answer
36 views

Gauss' law and ions?

My text book says that with we have a singly ionized sodium atom net charge +e and if we choose a spherical surface centered on the ion and large enough to contain it all we do not need to know the ...
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4answers
2k views

Potential difference between point on surface and point on axis of uniformly charged cylinder

Question: Charge is uniformly distributed with charge density $ρ$ inside a very long cylinder of radius $R$. Find the potential difference between the surface and the axis of the cylinder. Express ...
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2answers
44 views

Electric Field in Conductor Zero?

My textbook claims that the electric field in a conductor is zero in a static condition, as otherwise, a current would flow. But what if I go infinitely close to a proton; there will be an electric ...
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0answers
24 views

How to calculate the electrostatic force applied on an object that is along the axis of a charged tube's surface?

Let's say there is a charged tube(a cylinder with no top and bottom) with radius r and length l, charge q1 which also made out of insulating material. And also if there is an object with charge q2 ...
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0answers
48 views

How to calculate the electrostatic force applied on an object that is along the axis of a charged tube?

Let's say there is a charged tube(a cylinder with no top and bottom) with radius r and length l, charge q1 which also made out of insulating material. And also if there is an object with charge q2 ...
2
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1answer
64 views

What would happen if charged plates are placed horizontally?

My idea is placing charged conducting plates in such a way that they won't see each others' surfaces unlikely to the typical design of parallel plates. If they are placed like this, would be the force ...
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1answer
87 views

How can I apply to the differential form of Gauss' Law? [closed]

I'm trying to learn Maxwell's equations but I got stuck. I couldn't understand the usage of the differential form of the Gauss' law. How can it be applied to questions? For example, let's say there is ...
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1answer
90 views

Is there an analogous Gauss' law which is applicable for a gravitational field?

Consider the Earth to be a flat infinite plane having linear mass density equal to the mass density of the actual earth. Can there be an analogous Gauss' law that can give the gravitational field ...
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4answers
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Divergence of a field and its interpretation

The divergence of an electric field due to a point charge (according to Coulomb's law) is zero. In literature the divergence of a field indicates presence/absence of a sink/source for the field. ...
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171 views

Why can charges outside be ignored in Gauss's Law?

In MIT's 8.02 course, it is shown in lecture 3 that we can derive Gauss's Law from Coulomb's to get $ \phi = \oint \vec{E} \cdot \vec{dA} = \frac{Q_{enc}}{\epsilon_{0}} $ However, in the lecture, it ...
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3answers
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Why the electric field $\vec{E}$ is constant (=position independent) for an infinite 2D sheet of constant charge?

So I'm reading a text on electricity and it talks about using the integral to compute the total charge of a collection of points, which I mostly understand. But then we get to finding the electric ...
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2answers
144 views

Two capacitor plates with equal positive charges $q$

I read in a book that if both the plates of a parallel plate capacitor are given equal positive charges $q$, then the charges on the facing surfaces will be zero and the charge on the outer surfaces ...
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5answers
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Why is the electric field of an infinite insulated plane of charge perpendicular to the plane?

I'm studying Gauss' Law, and I came across a section where we're supposed to find the electric field of various shapes (like an infinite line of charges, etc), and for an infinite plane with a uniform ...
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3answers
759 views

Is the electrostatic field inside of any closed, uniformly charged surface zero?

We know that a simple application of Gauss's law tells us that the field inside of a uniformly charged spherical shell is zero. Does this hold for all uniformly charged closed surfaces? If so, how ...
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1answer
1k views

Electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length with Gauss' Law

I'm confused with the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length. I know that we can use the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two ...
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2answers
75 views

Charge inside a sphere

Suppose I have a sphere of radius $r$ with all the charge residing on the surface, distributed uniformly i.e. charge density $\sigma$ is constant. I want to find the electric field created by this ...
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2answers
123 views

Divergence of conservative electric field

I have a little doubt about the following: according Gauss law in the form of Maxwell's equation, we know that: $$ {\rm div} (D)~=~ \rho(v) $$ This just tells us that the electric field has nonzero ...
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2answers
114 views

Gauss's Law for a Uniformly Charged Solid Sphere [duplicate]

We want to calculate $\vec{E}$ at a distance $r$ from the center $O$ of a spherical polar coordinate system. Let the point on the Gaussian surface at which we want to calculate $\vec{E}$ is ...
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1answer
64 views

Electrostatic field in a Dielectric equations misbehaving

Equation 1: $\int{\vec{E}.\vec{ds}} = \int\frac{\rho_{free} + \rho_{bound}}{\epsilon_0} dv$ (Gauss's Law) Equation 2: $\int{\vec{D}.\vec{ds}} = \int\rho_{free} dv$ (Gauss's Law) , but $\vec{D} = ...
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1answer
522 views

Electric Field at surface/side of cylinder [closed]

I know I can use Gauss's law to find the Electric Field inside and outside the cylinder very easily. We can select Gaussian surfaces for different cases (i.e. $r \lt R$ and $r \gt R$, where $R$ is the ...
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2answers
79 views

Gaussian surfaces and Gauss law

Does Gauss law holds for any closed surface or it only holds for only Gaussian surface. Are every closed surface a Gaussian surface?
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1answer
96 views

Gaussian surface and and Gauss law

Can we consider a cube as a Gaussian surface, for a point charge located at its center.since,Gaussian surface is a closed surface which has a constant electric field but in this case the both the ...
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2answers
210 views

A little question about Gauss' Law

So I've just learned Gauss' Law a few days ago. I also worked out some applications of Gauss' Law. But I have a little confusion. In a couple of books that I referred, I found a statement that I don't ...
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2answers
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Gauss’s Law inside the hollow of charged spherical shell

Use Gauss’s Law to prove that the electric field anywhere inside the hollow of a charged spherical shell must be zero. My attempt: $$\int \mathbf{E}\cdot \mathbf{dA} = \frac{q_{net}}{e}$$ $$\int E ...
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1answer
219 views

Why does acceleration seem not to be the gradient of gravitational potential?

Consider a spherically symmetric distribution of density $\rho(r)$. We can define the mass enclosed within each radius $r$ using $\frac{dM(r)}{dr} = 4\pi r^2 \rho(r)$, with the condition that $M(r=0) ...
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1answer
129 views

Flux on a Gaussian surface between two charged plates

If we have two parallel charged plates, equal and opposite in charge: What is the flux felt on a Gaussian surface between them? surely it sum to 0 as each amount of flux will enter and then leave? ...
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2answers
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Field between the plates of a parallel plate capacitor using Gauss's Law

Consider the following parallel plate capacitor made of two plates with equal area $A$ and equal surface charge density $\sigma$: The electric field due to the positive plate is ...
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1answer
172 views

Weird consequence of Gauss's law

According to Gauss's Law, the electric field at a surface is the function of only the charge enclosed inside it. But that doesn't make sense. I mean, if I put the surface in an electric field, won't ...
2
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2answers
456 views

Does the induced charge on a conductor stay at the surface?

My textbook says that when a conductor is placed in an electric field, the electrons in it realign so that the net electric field inside the conductor is zero. There isn't a proof for this. It merely ...
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2answers
179 views

Gauss' law question

It's actually a teaching conflict at my school. They said that $$\text{Flux}=\frac{q}{\varepsilon_0}.$$ Say for a point charge at the centre of the sphere and let's say we not put water into the ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the electric field between and outside infinite parallel plates?

I know that Gauss's law says $$\oint_S {\vec{E} \cdot d\vec{A} = \frac{q_{enc}}{{\epsilon _0 }}}$$ and that because $\vec{E}$ is always parallel to $d\vec{A}$ in this case, and $\vec{E}$ is a ...
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2answers
438 views

2D Gauss law vs residue theorem

I used to have a vague feeling that the residue theorem is a close analogy to 2D electrostatics in which the residues themselves play a role of point charges. However, the equations don't seem to add ...
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1answer
539 views

Why does Gauss's law work for a charge off center in a spherical surface?

CASE 1: Consider an enclosed spherical surface with a charge $q$ at its centre. From Gauss' law we can say that the flux through this sphere is $q/\epsilon_0$. CASE 2: The charge is inside but off ...
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Integral form of Gauss's law for magnetism from Stokes' theorem?

How can the integral form of Gauss's law for magnetism be described as a version of general Stokes' theorem? How does it follow?
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2answers
320 views

Gauss' Law for Magnetism Derivative Form: With or without volume integral?

I've been reading through FLP Vol. II, and he has proven that as the flux through a closed surface is: $\ \int_{surface} \mathbf{F} \space \mathrm{d}\mathbf{a} $, according to the divergence theorem, ...
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1answer
147 views

Can Gauss' Law in differential form apply to surface charges?

I'm calculating the electric field outside a coaxial cable using only Gauss' Law in differential form. The charge density on the interior solid conducting cylinder is exactly cancelled by the surface ...
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1answer
150 views

Am I interpreting Gauss' Divergence Theorem correctly

I was reading Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffiths and I wanted to check if I understood Gauss' Divergence Theorem correctly. The theorem states: $$\int \int \int_V \vec{\nabla} \cdot \vec{C} ...
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0answers
55 views

Gauss's Law problem [closed]

I've been thinking about this for a while, but I'm not sure how to proceed. I understand uniform charge-density problems, but the added non-uniform deal makes me uneasy: find the e. field inside a ...
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0answers
45 views

Electric Field: distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length [closed]

One charge density surface is distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length with $2a$ width from distance $d$. Determine the Electric Field in the point perpendicular from the distance $d$ ...
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0answers
144 views

Electric field of a capacitor in dielectric medium with weird size

I have been learning gauss's law in capacitor recently, recently I come up with this problem that I couldn't solve myself. If we have a capacitor,and a dielectric medium with half the volume between ...
2
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1answer
77 views

Electric field in a cylinder

We have electric charge density $\rho(r) = kr$ in a cylinder of infinite height and radius $a$. I'm asked to find the electric field. I'm doing it using two methods and I don't undesrtand why then ...
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2answers
2k views

What is meant by “net charge”?

Lets consider a system of two opposite charges separated by a certain distance (dipole), if we ask what is the net charge for this system? the answer would be zero. The net charge (what I have come ...
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2answers
98 views

1 charge at the center and many uniformly distributed on the surface of a perfect ideal conducting solid sphere

Suppose there is a perfect ideal conducting solid sphere. Suppose somehow a charge of $+Q$ is kept exactly at the center of the sphere and its surface is also given a $+Q$ charge uniformly distributed ...
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5answers
458 views

Why is the electric field inside a conductor zero in equilibrium?

My textbook says the field inside a conductor must be zero in order for the system to be equilibrium and therefore there must be no excess charge inside. Their proof: 1) Place a gaussian surface ...
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0answers
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How to prove Gauss's law div(E) = rho/epsilon from Coulomb's law? [duplicate]

As we know from coulomb's law that: $$\vec{E} = \frac{q}{4\pi\epsilon R^2} \hat{R}$$ using the above equation, how can I verify that: $$\vec{\nabla}\cdot \vec{E}=\frac{q}{\epsilon}$$ I have tried to ...
2
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1answer
660 views

Finding electric field between overlapping surfaces [closed]

The problem is: A sphere with radius R is centered at the origin, an infinite cylinder with radius R has its axis along the z axis, and an infinite slab with thickness 2R lies between the planes ...
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3answers
3k views

What is the purpose of differential form of Gauss Law?

I am learning the differential form of Gauss Law derived from the divergence theorem. $${\rm div}~ \vec{E} =\frac{\rho}{\epsilon_0}.$$ So far in my study of math and physics, the word "differential" ...