A law in Classical Electromagnetism and Newtonian Gravity.

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Electric field due to a charged conductor

I have this grave confusion that I have been having since a while. When we calculate the electric field due to an infinite plane sheet of charge then the answer comes out to be $σ/2ε$. In this case we ...
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43 views

Gauss Law with a hollow asymmetric surface

In this video, Walter Lewin argues that no charge will appear on the inside surface of a hollow conductor in electrostatic equilibrium. He uses a Gaussian surface contained entirely within the ...
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66 views

Solved Gauss' Law for $\vec{E}$ without boundary conditions?

Why can I solve for the electric field of a point charge Q at the origin without boundary conditions? $\nabla\cdot\vec{E}=\rho/\varepsilon_0 = \delta(\vec{r})/\varepsilon_0$ is a 1st order ...
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Electric field in a conductor

Is it always true that the electric field in a conductor is zero? What would happen if I put a very big charge inside an ungrounded hollow conducting sphere like this image? The charges inside the ...
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Gauss's law for induced electric and magnetic field

Let us consider an accelerating charge, $Q$. As it is accelerating it would radiate energy in the form of EM waves, as per the classical postulates of EM theory. As such there would be induced ...
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Gauss's Law of Electric Field how it actually works? & How Gauss derived it?

I want to know how Gauss derived his equation of Electric Field. Did he derive it from Coulomb's law? I don't think so. Please tell me some details about how this law works? inside a Gaussian ...
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Electric Field Between Two Parallel Infinite Plates of Positive Charge and a Gaussian Cylinder

Is the electric field between two positively charged parallel infinite plates one with a charge density twice the other effect the electric field on the outside of the plates? I am thinking no, ...
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Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
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Divergence of non conservative electric field

I'm looking for the proof that the 1st Maxwell equation is valid also on non conservative electric field. When we are talking about a electrostatic field, the equation is ok. We can apply the Gauss (...
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816 views

Calculating capacitance of arbitrary plate shape and arrangement.

Looking for suggestions on how to approach calculating the capacitance of a capacitor where the plates have an arbitrary shape. I've seen derivations of capacitance for a few highly symmetric ...
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119 views

Scaling of Static Electric Field

The electric field of a point charge goes like $\displaystyle\frac{1}{r^2}$ The electric field of an infinite line goes like $\displaystyle\frac{1}{s}$ The electric field of an infinite plane is ...
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47 views

Gauss law and electrostatic induction. Concentric spheres

Imagine you have hollow concentric spheres A and B with radius a and b (b>a), respectively. If A is a conductor and B has a certain density charge, I´ve been taught that B will induce some net charge ...
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58 views

Electric field at surface of a spherical shell

The shell theorem provides a well known result that for a spherical shell with uniformly distributed charge $Q$ and radius $R$, the electric field at a distance of $r$ from the center is: $$\begin{...
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Can Gauss' Law in differential form apply to surface charges?

I'm calculating the electric field outside a coaxial cable using only Gauss' Law in differential form. The charge density on the interior solid conducting cylinder is exactly cancelled by the surface ...
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Confusion regarding gauss law

Gauss law states that flux due to net electric field on a Gaussian surface is charge enclosed/permittivity. Lets take a spherical Gaussian surface with +q charge at centre. We can simply calculate the ...
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What does the Dirac delta function physically do while deriving Gauss Law form Coulomb's law?

While doing this derivation, the the source coordinates are mentioned as "$s$" and the coordinate of the point at which field is to be calculated is mentioned as "$r$". Kindly follow this Wikipedia ...
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Difference between $E$ field configuration, sheet of charge: infinite sheet of charge, conducting vs. non-conducting

This is a very easy question, but I often confused myself. Perhaps someone could explain this concept again: A non-conducting infinite sheet of charge has the electric field configuration \begin{...
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199 views

Electric field of a capacitor in dielectric medium with weird size

I have been learning gauss's law in capacitor recently, recently I come up with this problem that I couldn't solve myself. If we have a capacitor,and a dielectric medium with half the volume between ...
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Is Gauss' law valid for time-dependent electric fields?

The Maxwell's equation $\boldsymbol{\nabla}\cdot \textbf{E}(\textbf{r})=\frac{\rho(\textbf{r})}{\epsilon_0}$ is derived from the Gauss law in electrostatics (which is in turn derived from Coulomb's ...
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Gauss' law - changes in the magnitude of E field inside the closed surface

Gauss's law says that the flux through a closed surface which contains neither a sink nor a source will be zero. It's quite clear that all field lines will have to exit somehow, but the strength of ...
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How to approximate trajectories and movement of two oppositely charged particles?

Imagine a single, stationary charged atomic ion, say a Lithium anion or cation (Li+ or Li-). Now imagine another a single free, oppositely charged particle--perhaps an electron or Hydrogen ion (H+)--...
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My conundrum with Gauss’ law in electrostatics

If I use Gauss’ law to calculate the electric field outside of a charged (conducting or insulating) sphere or a point charge, the fields are the same. However, as a test approaches a point charge, the ...
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Where is the flaw in deriving Gauss's law in its differential form?

From the divergence theorem for any vector field E, $\displaystyle\oint E\cdot da=\int (\nabla\cdot E) ~d\tau$ and from Gauss's law $\displaystyle\oint E\cdot da=\frac{Q_{enclosed}}{\epsilon_0}=\...
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Gauss' law giving zero field where field is not zero?

Two plastic sheets with charged densities as shown: I'm trying to find the field at $B$. I obtained the correct answer by adding up the fields created by each charge density. But I realized that ...
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Calculate the flux of a point charge with Gauss's law

I know from my class that to calculate the flux of a point charge with Gauss's law, I have to make a surface that intersects with all of the flux lines resulting from the charge, and then make this ...
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Gauss's Law understanding

In the case of a point charge $q$ at the origin, the flux of $\vec{E}$ through a sphere of radius r is, \begin{equation} \oint \vec{E}\cdot d\vec{a} = \int \frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 }(\frac{q}{r^2}\...
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Formula of Gauss' Law of Gravitation

Gauss's law for Gravitation: $$\int g\cdot \mathrm{d}S=4\pi GM$$ where $g$ is the gravitational field and $S$ is the surface area. Am I correct?
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What is the significance of the Inverse-square law? [duplicate]

Considering its occurrences in various fields like Electrostatics, Gravitation, Acoustics etc. how does the law bind these topics together?
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What is meant by “unique direction” in most of the arguments in application of Gauss' Law?

This term is really bothering me a lot. While explaining the radial direction of electric field of a uniformly charged sphere, my book writes: Notice the use of argument of symmetry. There is no ...
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2 dimensional Coulomb's law equation

We can notice that in the Coulomb's law equation, $$\begin{equation}\tag{1}F=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon}\cdot\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}\end{equation} $$ $4\pi r^2$ factor in the denominator expresses directly ...
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How to find electric scalar potential of infinite wire with Poisson/Laplace equation?

I though it will be easier then calculating the electric field and then integrating, but I am stuck. lets say we have an infinite wire, charged $\lambda$ per unit of length and its located at the ...
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Why can we use Gauss' law to compute electric field?

For simplicity I'm considering only the sphere case. In the Gauss' Law formulation we have some field $E$ introduced by charges $Q$ inside some sphere, then we compute flux and integrate, and we get ...
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What are the applications of Gauss's law in technology? [closed]

Freshmen physics textbooks use Gauss's law plus symmetry to calculate the electric field. I was wondering if this method of finding the electric field using a symmetry is used in real applications in ...
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In which cases is it better to use Gauss' law?

I could, for example calculate the electric field near a charged rod of infinite length using the classic definition of the electric field, and integrating the: $$ \overrightarrow{dE} = \frac{dq}{4 \...
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137 views

Electric field of a Uniformly charged sphere with a cavity [closed]

I have the following question: Consider a sphere of radius $R$, uniformly charged with a volume density $\rho$. The sphere has a spherical hole of radius $R/4$ at a distance $R/2$ from the ...
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Is there something similar to Gauss's Law For Gravity in General Relativity?

In Newtonian Physics there is an equation that for the Gravitational Flux of an object known as Gauss's Law For Gravity. Gauss's Law for Gravity describes the number of Gravitational Field Lines ...
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Charge outside Gaussian Surface doesn't contribute to Flux?

I roughly understand the explanation for this: any electric field line that enters the surface, must leave it, since field lines can't terminate abruptly in space. My question is, what if you have a ...
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Does the induced charge on a conductor stay at the surface?

My textbook says that when a conductor is placed in an electric field, the electrons in it realign so that the net electric field inside the conductor is zero. There isn't a proof for this. It merely ...
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220 views

Why Gauss' law is applied?

Why Gauss' law is applied? Why is there a need of finding electric field by Gauss' law if we can find the electric field through Coulomb's law? or has it got more applications than Coulomb's law?
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Intuition behind defining divergence as flux divided by volume?

For a continuously differentiable vector field $F$ the divergence theorem can be used to give $$(\nabla\cdot F)(a) = \lim_{r\to 0} \frac{3}{4\pi r^3}\int_{|x-a|=r} F \cdot n dA$$ This should mean that ...
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Does changing a closed surface in the manner outlined contradict Gauss' Law?

As I understand it, Gauss' Law states that the electric flux on any arbitrary closed surface is equivalent to the sum of all charges enclosed within the surface times a constant. Mathematically, this ...
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Gauss law in dielectrics

How shall we apply Gauss's law for a space such that the volume enclosed by the Gaussian surface have 2 or more mediums with different dielectric constants, such that equal or more than two ...
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531 views

Gauss' law in differential form for a point charge

I'm trying to understand how the integral form is derived from the differential form of Gauss' law. I have several issues: 1) The law states that $ \nabla\cdot E=\frac{1}{\epsilon 0}\rho$, but when ...
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165 views

Divergence Theorem, mathematical approach to Gauss's Law?

Let $D$ be a compact region in $\mathbb{R}^3$ with a smooth boundary $S$. Assume $0 \in \text{Int}(D)$. If an electric charge of magnitude $q$ is placed at $0$, the resulting force field is $q\vec{r}/...
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Why inverse square not inverse cube law? [duplicate]

So as I understand, the inverse-square law which shows up in a variety of physical laws (Newton's universal law of gravitation, Coulomb's law, etc.) is a mathematical consequence of point-like ...
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1answer
164 views

Is it equivalent to derive Gauss's law from discrete and continuous source distributions?

I've seen two derivations for Gauss's law in electrostatics. The first assumes a discrete charge distribution, the second a continuous one: Use superposition $$\vec{E}=\sum_{i=1}^n\vec{E}_i,$$ so ...
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157 views

Electric field of a finite, conducting plate

Let us assume a finite, conducting plate of dimension: $10\mathrm{m} \times 10\mathrm{m} \times 1\mathrm{m}$. I want to determine the electric field at the middle of one of the plates $10\mathrm{m} \...
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Electric Field in Conductor Zero?

My textbook claims that the electric field in a conductor is zero in a static condition, as otherwise, a current would flow. But what if I go infinitely close to a proton; there will be an electric ...
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Field between the plates of a parallel plate capacitor using Gauss's Law

Consider the following parallel plate capacitor made of two plates with equal area $A$ and equal surface charge density $\sigma$: The electric field due to the positive plate is $$\frac{\sigma}{\...
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Gauss' law question

It's actually a teaching conflict at my school. They said that $$\text{Flux}=\frac{q}{\varepsilon_0}.$$ Say for a point charge at the centre of the sphere and let's say we not put water into the ...