A law in Classical Electromagnetism and Newtonian Gravity.

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Formula of Gauss' Law of Gravitation

Gauss's law for Gravitation: $$\int g\cdot \mathrm{d}S=4\pi GM$$ where $g$ is the gravitational field and $S$ is the surface area. Am I correct?
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Why can we use Gauss' law to compute electric field?

For simplicity I'm considering only the sphere case. In the Gauss' Law formulation we have some field $E$ introduced by charges $Q$ inside some sphere, then we compute flux and integrate, and we get ...
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What are the applications of Gauss's law in technology? [closed]

Freshmen physics textbooks use Gauss's law plus symmetry to calculate the electric field. I was wondering if this method of finding the electric field using a symmetry is used in real applications in ...
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998 views

Electric Field of Hollow Cylinder

Let's say we have a hollow cylinder with a charge $q$, radius $r$ and height $h$ as in the figure below. I am trying to find the electric field perpendicular to the surface of the hollow cylinder. I ...
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489 views

Charge outside Gaussian Surface doesn't contribute to Flux?

I roughly understand the explanation for this: any electric field line that enters the surface, must leave it, since field lines can't terminate abruptly in space. My question is, what if you have a ...
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Does the induced charge on a conductor stay at the surface?

My textbook says that when a conductor is placed in an electric field, the electrons in it realign so that the net electric field inside the conductor is zero. There isn't a proof for this. It merely ...
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172 views

Why Gauss' law is applied?

Why Gauss' law is applied? Why is there a need of finding electric field by Gauss' law if we can find the electric field through Coulomb's law? or has it got more applications than Coulomb's law?
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Intuition behind defining divergence as flux divided by volume?

For a continuously differentiable vector field $F$ the divergence theorem can be used to give $$(\nabla\cdot F)(a) = \lim_{r\to 0} \frac{3}{4\pi r^3}\int_{|x-a|=r} F \cdot n dA$$ This should mean that ...
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Why inverse square not inverse cube law? [duplicate]

So as I understand, the inverse-square law which shows up in a variety of physical laws (Newton's universal law of gravitation, Coulomb's law, etc.) is a mathematical consequence of point-like ...
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Electric Field in Conductor Zero?

My textbook claims that the electric field in a conductor is zero in a static condition, as otherwise, a current would flow. But what if I go infinitely close to a proton; there will be an electric ...
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What would happen if charged plates are placed horizontally?

My idea is placing charged conducting plates in such a way that they won't see each others' surfaces unlikely to the typical design of parallel plates. If they are placed like this, would be the force ...
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Gauss' law question

It's actually a teaching conflict at my school. They said that $$\text{Flux}=\frac{q}{\varepsilon_0}.$$ Say for a point charge at the centre of the sphere and let's say we not put water into the ...
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Electric field in a cylinder

We have electric charge density $\rho(r) = kr$ in a cylinder of infinite height and radius $a$. I'm asked to find the electric field. I'm doing it using two methods and I don't undesrtand why then ...
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How are excess charges distributed over non-spherical conductors?

My textbook gives the following explanation on how excess charges are spread over conductors: The excess charge on an isolated conductor moves entirely to the conductor's surface. However, ...
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Newtonian Gravity on a Riemannian $3$-Manifold

To solve the Poisson equation for the Newton Potential, say $\phi$, one can use the divergence theorem, such that $$\int_U \nabla^2 \phi \sqrt{g}~ dV= \int_{\partial U} <\nabla \phi,n> ...
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Would a non-conducting body ever acquire a uniform static charge throughout it's volume?

I'm studying electromagnetism and optics in first year and solving a lot of problems involving conveniently symmetrical conducting and non-conducting bodies having various uniformly distributed ...
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Electric field due to a charged conductor

I have this grave confusion that I have been having since a while. When we calculate the electric field due to an infinite plane sheet of charge then the answer comes out to be $σ/2ε$. In this case we ...
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Gauss's Law of Electric Field how it actually works? & How Gauss derived it?

I want to know how Gauss derived his equation of Electric Field. Did he derive it from Coulomb's law? I don't think so. Please tell me some details about how this law works? inside a Gaussian ...
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Is it equivalent to derive Gauss's law from discrete and continuous source distributions?

I've seen two derivations for Gauss's law in electrostatics. The first assumes a discrete charge distribution, the second a continuous one: Use superposition $$\vec{E}=\sum_{i=1}^n\vec{E}_i,$$ so ...
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Is there an analogous Gauss' law which is applicable for a gravitational field?

Consider the Earth to be a flat infinite plane having linear mass density equal to the mass density of the actual earth. Can there be an analogous Gauss' law that can give the gravitational field ...
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Newtonian gravity equation in a 2 dimensional world [duplicate]

I am wondering if my line of thought is correct - and thus the resulting answer to the problem above would be correct. As we know the gravitational force (of two point masses) is given by $$F = ...
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Behavior of the electric field on boundary surfaces

Consider this picture. Integrating over this infinitesimal box gives the following equivalencies: $$\int_{\Delta V} d^3r~{\rm div} \vec{E}(\vec{r}) = \int_{S(\Delta V)} d\vec{f} \cdot ...
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Electric field inside and outside a metallic hollow sphere

1) It is known that inside a metallic hollow sphere it will not experience outside electric field because of the charge separation of electrons and holes at the surface of sphere and creating an equal ...
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Electric potential of sphere

(a) I am a little confused about this part. The point at A to B isn't radial. The electric field is radially outward, but if I look at the integral $$\int_{a}^{b}\mathbf{E}\cdot d\mathbf{s} = ...
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How can I apply to the differential form of Gauss' Law? [closed]

I'm trying to learn Maxwell's equations but I got stuck. I couldn't understand the usage of the differential form of the Gauss' law. How can it be applied to questions? For example, let's say there is ...
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Electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length with Gauss' Law

I'm confused with the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two coaxial cylindrical conductors of finite length. I know that we can use the Gauss' Law to calculate the electric field for two ...
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642 views

Finding electric field between overlapping surfaces [closed]

The problem is: A sphere with radius R is centered at the origin, an infinite cylinder with radius R has its axis along the z axis, and an infinite slab with thickness 2R lies between the planes ...
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insulator based gauss law questions

My book is incredibly scarce on insulator based Gauss law questions. Conductors seem to handle themselves pretty simply. Here's a question I'm working on that isn't part of my book. where the radii ...
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Electric field due to a solid sphere of charge

I have been trying to understand the last step of this derivation. Consider a sphere made up of charge $+q$. Let $R$ be the radius of the sphere and $O$, its center. A point $P$ lies inside the ...
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What does it mean that a magnetic field's flux vanishes through any closed surface?

I'm reading the Britannica guide to Electricity and Magnetism, and I came across the following quote: A fundamental property of a magnetic field is that its flux through any closed surface ...
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Why the electric field $\vec{E}$ is constant (=position independent) for an infinite 2D sheet of constant charge?

So I'm reading a text on electricity and it talks about using the integral to compute the total charge of a collection of points, which I mostly understand. But then we get to finding the electric ...
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A closed surface, no charge enclosed, yet flux not 0?

! The book says it is $E_0\pi r^2$ because the flux through the circle is equal to the curved part of the paraboloid. I don't understand this, shouldn't the total flux be 0 for the whole surface? ...
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In which cases is it better to use Gauss' law?

I could, for example calculate the electric field near a charged rod of infinite length using the classic definition of the electric field, and integrating the: $$ \overrightarrow{dE} = \frac{dq}{4 ...
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Using Gauss's law (differential form) on an infinite line of charge

I just read about Gauss's law in differential form and how to compute divergence. I worked out the $1/r^2$ field and got zero as expected! I was very happy. Then I thought the infinite line of charge, ...
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Inverse Square Law and extra space dimensions

Newton's famous Inverse Square Law says that in $n=3$ dimension of space, force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between a source and a target. I understand that for higher ...
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Divergence of conservative electric field

I have a little doubt about the following: according Gauss law in the form of Maxwell's equation, we know that: $$ {\rm div} (D)~=~ \rho(v) $$ This just tells us that the electric field has nonzero ...
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Why does Gauss's law work for a charge off center in a spherical surface?

CASE 1: Consider an enclosed spherical surface with a charge $q$ at its centre. From Gauss' law we can say that the flux through this sphere is $q/\epsilon_0$. CASE 2: The charge is inside but off ...
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2 dimensional Coulomb's law equation

We can notice that in the Coulomb's law equation, $$\begin{equation}\tag{1}F=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon}\cdot\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}\end{equation} $$ $4\pi r^2$ factor in the denominator expresses directly ...
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Zero divergence of Electric field

I'm trying to rigorously derive the integral form of Gauss's law from Coulomb's law and the divergence theorem. Arrive at $$ \oint\limits_{\partial V} E\cdot da = \begin{cases} \frac ...
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Charge inside a sphere

Suppose I have a sphere of radius $r$ with all the charge residing on the surface, distributed uniformly i.e. charge density $\sigma$ is constant. I want to find the electric field created by this ...
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Electrostatic field in a Dielectric equations misbehaving

Equation 1: $\int{\vec{E}.\vec{ds}} = \int\frac{\rho_{free} + \rho_{bound}}{\epsilon_0} dv$ (Gauss's Law) Equation 2: $\int{\vec{D}.\vec{ds}} = \int\rho_{free} dv$ (Gauss's Law) , but $\vec{D} = ...
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Gauss Law for Magnetism,Non Instantaneous Field Propagation

Is the magnetic force instantaneous? And, are all field lines established simultaneously? Otherwise, for example, the field line marked 'L' will take longer time to propagate than the ones above it, ...
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Why is the flux 0? I don't understand this concept

! Why does it say that the flux due to q_2 and q_3 through S is 0? Doesn't it contain a nonzero charge q_1? Does anyone also know the difference between "no charge" vs "net charge is 0"? My book ...
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where does the term half in the formula of electrostatic potential energy comes from?(system of point charges)

Electrostatic potential energy stored in a system of point charges (from wikipedia) The electrostatic potential energy $U_E$ stored in a system of N charges q1, q2, ..., qN at positions r1, r2, ...
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Electric Flux - What is the point?

Electric flux is a defined quantity that is proportional to the no. of field lines passing through a given area element for a given electric field. It is not proportional to the relative density of ...
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Wait… why exactly does farady's ice pail experiment prove Gauss's law?

You'll notice there are no equations in this: that's because this is a question of morale, not of math. But a humble one at that! I come to learn, not to expound. But don't let that limit the form ...
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Electric field around two charged hollow cylinders

There are two hollow cylinders with same lengths "l" as shown in the figure below. The smaller inner cylinder is negatively charged. The outer one is now induced to become positively charged. I am ...
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Help regarding understanding derivation of electrostatic potential in a solution to a problem

I was looking at the solution of finding the energy stored in a charged solid sphere in which the electric field was and then later stated the electrostatic potential is I understand that to ...
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Confusion about Gauss's law for Electrostatics

I just learning about Gauss's law in integral and differential form. There's something I'm a bit confused about: Let $\vec{r}$ be the location of your test charge with respect to the origin, and ...
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Is the charge of an ion evenly distributed?

This question relates to: Gauss' law and ions? Is the charge distribution in an ion spherically symmetric due to quantum mechanical effects or do we assume it when using Gauss's law, as in the ...