2
votes
1answer
43 views

What would happen if charged plates are placed horizontally?

My idea is placing charged conducting plates in such a way that they won't see each others' surfaces unlikely to the typical design of parallel plates. If they are placed like this, would be the force ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Electric Field: distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length [closed]

One charge density surface is distributed uniformly in one infinity tape of length with $2a$ width from distance $d$. Determine the Electric Field in the point perpendicular from the distance $d$ ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

How to prove Gauss's law div(E) = rho/epsilon from Coulomb's law? [duplicate]

As we know from coulomb's law that: $$\vec{E} = \frac{q}{4\pi\epsilon R^2} \hat{R}$$ using the above equation, how can I verify that: $$\vec{\nabla}\cdot \vec{E}=\frac{q}{\epsilon}$$ I have tried to ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Gauss law from Gauss divergence theorem [duplicate]

Apply Gauss divergence theorem to the gravitational field due to a spherical object of mass M and uniform density located at origin. Obtain Gauss law for gravitation in integral and differential ...
1
vote
1answer
168 views

Maxwells' equations and Coulomb's law

Coulomb's law and Maxwell's equations should be consistant as one can be derived from the other. Say we have a point charge with such a charge that $-kq=1$, meaning that at any point the electric ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Why Gauss' law is applied?

Why Gauss' law is applied? Why is there a need of finding electric field by Gauss' law if we can find the electric field through Coulomb's law? or has it got more applications than Coulomb's law?
3
votes
2answers
140 views

Relation between Gauss' law and Coulomb's law

In Coulomb's law if the relation was as if electric field intensity was to vary inversely $1/r$ with distance rather than the inverse $1/r^2$ of square of distance, would the Gauss's law still be ...
1
vote
3answers
806 views

2 dimensional Coulomb's law equation

We can notice that in the Coulomb's law equation, $$\begin{equation}\tag{1}F=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon}\cdot\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}\end{equation} $$ $4\pi r^2$ factor in the denominator expresses directly ...
2
votes
2answers
188 views

My conundrum with Gauss’ law in electrostatics

If I use Gauss’ law to calculate the electric field outside of a charged (conducting or insulating) sphere or a point charge, the fields are the same. However, as a test approaches a point charge, the ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

The relation between Gauss's law and Coulomb law and why is it important that the electric field decrease proportionally to $\frac{1}{r^{2}}$?

My question relates to the third MIT's video lecture about Electricity and Magnetism, specifically from $21:18-22:00$ : http://youtu.be/XaaP1bWFjDA?t=21m18s I have watched the development of Gauss's ...
3
votes
1answer
233 views

Coulomb potential

It is known that the Coulomb potential can be obtained by Fourier transform of the propagator from E&M. Is this because one of Maxwell's equations have the form $\nabla \cdot \mathbf{E}=\rho$?
1
vote
1answer
259 views

Finding the electric field on a point (x,y,z) using Coulomb's Law

Using Gauss' Law, the answer is $$\frac{Q}{4 \pi \epsilon R^2}.$$ However if I were to do the integration using Coulomb's Law, I get $$ \int_0^{2\pi} \int_{0}^{\pi}\int_r^a \frac{\rho \sin\theta dR ...
1
vote
1answer
481 views

Gravity force strength in 1D, 2D, 3D and higher spatial dimensions

Let's say that we want to measure the gravity force in 1D, 2D, 3D and higher spatial dimensions. Will we get the same force strength in the first 3 dimensions and then it will go up? How about if ...
15
votes
4answers
1k views

Why are so many forces explainable using inverse squares when space is three dimensional?

It seems paradoxical that the strength of so many phenomena (Newtonian gravity, Coulomb force) are calculable by the inverse square of distance. However, since volume is determined by three ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

How does one come up with the Coulomb's law?

My teacher mentioned that field line density = no. of lines / area and the total area of a sphere is $4\pi r^2$ and so an electric force is inversely proportional to $r^2$. Actually, why can the total ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

How is Gauss' Law (integral form) arrived at from Coulomb's Law, and how is the differential form arrived at from that?

On a similar note: when using Gauss' Law, do you even begin with Coulomb's law, or does one take it as given that flux is the surface integral of the Electric field in the direction of the normal to ...
1
vote
2answers
380 views

In which cases is it better to use Gauss' law?

I could, for example calculate the electric field near a charged rod of infinite length using the classic definition of the electric field, and integrating the: $$ \overrightarrow{dE} = \frac{dq}{4 ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Gaussian Unit of Charge and Force

I just read that in the Gaussian Units of charge The Final equation in Coulomb's law is as simple as $$\boldsymbol{F}=\frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}$$ No $\epsilon_0$ no $4\pi$ like you have in the $\mbox{SI}$ ...
39
votes
5answers
3k views

Does Coulomb's Law, with Gauss's Law, imply the existence of only three spatial dimensions?

Coulomb's Law states that the fall-off of the strength of the electrostatic force is inversely proportional to the distance squared of the charges. Gauss's law implies that a the total flux through a ...