A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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Observation of gauge in artificial magnetic fields

In the ultracold atom community, an "artificial gauge field" or "artificial magnetic field" is a spatially varying hopping phase somehow engineered into the system, so that atoms hopping around an ...
1
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1answer
50 views

Gauge freedom in tetrad

I asked the question in the MathOverflow, but didn't get any response. I thought maybe better luck here. I'm reading the following paper about Petrov type D space times called "Type D vacuum ...
1
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1answer
28 views

How to check if some term in the Lagrangian involving gauge bosons is gauge invariant without explicit computations?

Normally (for fermions and scalars) we can simply use the decomposition of tensor products of gauge group representations to find invariant terms that we can write into the Lagrangian. For example ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Do gauge bosons really transform according to the adjoint representation of the gauge group?

Its commonly said that gauge bosons transform according to the adjoint representation of the corresponding gauge group. For example, for $SU(2)$ the gauge bosons live in the adjoint $3$ dimensional ...
1
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0answers
43 views

How did Weyl's 1918 paper; Gravitation and Electricity, influence classical physics? [migrated]

The main-stream view seems to be that Weyl's 1918 paper Gravitation and Electricity was initially considered a failure for reasons first pointed out by Einstein. But these initial ideas were reapplied ...
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39 views

Extension of vector field and fluid velocity

I've been studying locomotion at low Reynolds number with gauge theories reading this paper and on pages 567 and 568 we find the explanation on how to compute the field strength tensor. For simplicity ...
5
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95 views

Derivation of field strength for locomotion at low Reynolds number

I've been studying locomotion at low Reynolds number for some time now and it has been a quite tough problem. I've already asked two questions about the problem here, and now there is this question ...
5
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3answers
377 views

Bianchi identity of a non-Abelian gauge theory?

How can one prove the Bianchi identity of a non-Abelian gauge theory? i.e. $$ \epsilon_{\mu \nu \lambda \sigma}(D_{\nu}F_{\lambda \sigma})^a=0 $$
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1answer
74 views

How to write the Lagrangian in terms of a projection

We know that $$ L=\frac{1}{2}\left(\partial_{\mu} A_{\nu} \partial^{\mu} A^{\nu}-\partial_{\mu} A_{\nu} \partial^{\nu} A^{\mu}\right) $$ But how do we write the Lagrangian in the following way: ...
3
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78 views

Field strength tensor for locomotion at low Reynolds number

Recently I've been studying locomotion at low Reynolds number. I already asked here about the computation of the gauge potential. Now I have a more objective question, which arose when reading the ...
7
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2answers
607 views

Vector Potential for Magnetic field when the field is not in simply-connected region

According to Poincare's Lemma, if $U\subset \mathbb{R}^n$ is a star-shaped set and if $\omega$ is a $k$-form defined in $U$ that is closed, then $\omega$ is exact, meaning that there's some ...
5
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0answers
108 views

Gauge potential for locomotion at low Reynolds number

I've been studying some approaches with gauge theory to some problems in Mechanics and I've found the problem of self propulsion at low Reynolds number a quite complicated one. The approach I'm asking ...
1
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1answer
95 views

Is my understanding of Gauge Symmetries correct?

I'm currently working on a project about Symmetry Breaking for my physics bachelor. Right now I'm trying to understand Gauge Symmetries (although I guess it's not much of a symmetry). And I've been ...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Why is the electromagnetic four-potential $A_{\mu}$ not an observable?

Why within classical field-theory the electromagnetic four-potential (usually $A_{\mu}$) not an observable? In classical mechanics we don't have problems with energy measurements and in quantum ...
0
votes
1answer
108 views

Can the physical properties of the EM field be described directly from the 4-gauge potential?

I'm trying to make an argument that classically, the EM field is considered a more 'real' physical quantity than the potentials, and am tempted to say that the fact that the field carries energy & ...
2
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0answers
49 views

AdS/CFT-duality: How does the $U(1)$ decouple form the $U(N)$?

A stack of N coincident D3-branes on its world-volume describe, at the lowest order in $\alpha'$ and in absence of non-trivial background fields, a supersymmetric $U(N)$ gauge theory as explained in ...
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2answers
398 views

Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?

Even before quantization, charged bosonic fields exhibit a certain "self-interaction". The body of this post demonstrates this fact, and the last paragraph asks the question. Notation/ Lagrangians ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Compute variation left action subgroup [migrated]

I consider a Lie group $G$, with a group element $g$ parametrised in some manner with parameter $\theta_i$, $i=1,\cdots, \dim G$. Suppose that $K\subset G$. I want to compute the variation of an group ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Are the pion fields in chiral perturbation theory complex or real fields?

The chiral perturbation theory Lagrangian is written $$\mathcal{L}_2=\frac{f_{\pi}^2}{4}Tr(D_{\mu}U^{\dagger}D^{\mu}U)$$ shouldn't we complex conjugate the first covariant derivative? what triggers ...
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1answer
75 views

Are all elementary interactions arising from a gauge theory?

The standard model of particle physics is based on the gauge group $U(1) \times SU(2) \times SU(3)$ and describes all well-known physical interactions but with exception that gravity isn't involved. ...
2
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1answer
227 views

Does the low-energy gauge structure depend on the choice of $SU(2)$ gauge freedom?

The starting point and notations used here are presented in Two puzzles on the Projective Symmetry Group(PSG)?. As we know, Invariant Gauge Group(IGG) is a normal subgroup of Projective Symmetry ...
5
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1answer
94 views

Transformation Law for Covariant Derivative in $SU(2)$ Yang-Mills

In page 488 of Peskin and Schroeder, it is stated (emphasis mine): It is not difficult to check using (15.27) and (15.21) that, even for finite transformations, the covariant derivative has the ...
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1answer
38 views

Transformations of electroweak gauge field $W_\mu$ under $U(1)_{e.m.}$

As the vector boson field $W_\mu$ is, together with $Z^0$, the gauge field for the Standard electroweak model, I know it transforms as a connection under the $SU(2)\times U(1)_Y$ group. But, when this ...
0
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2answers
58 views

The notion of fixing a gauge

I don't understand the notion of gauge fixing; can we choose any gauge or are there some restrictions? For example why can we choose $\nabla\phi = 0$ here: Determine the Electric field using ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

Why is $U(1)$ special when defining global charges?

For gauge groups like $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ etc. we know that observable states such as mesons or baryons must be charge neutral. However, for a $U(1)$ gauge group we can have charged initial states in ...
6
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1answer
285 views

Is the U(1) gauge theory in 2+1D dual to a U(1) or an integer XY model?

The compact U(1) lattice gauge theory is described by the action $$S_0=-\frac{1}{g^2}\sum_\square \cos\left(\sum_{l\in\partial \square}A_l\right),$$ where the gauge connection $A_l\in$U(1) is defined ...
2
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1answer
205 views

Reduction of Nambu Goto action to true degrees of freedom

First consider the particle $$S=m\int\sqrt{-\dot{X}^2}d\tau$$ if you choose the static gauge $\tau=X^0$ and replace it in the action you get $$=m\int\sqrt{1-\dot{X}^j\dot{X}^j}d\tau$$ So now, you ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Origin of integral of field strength tensor in path-ordered exponential in gauge field theory

When studying some gauge theories approach to problems in Mechanics, I've found the following integral $$P\exp\left[\oint A \ dt\right]=1+\dfrac{1}{2}\oint_{\partial ...
1
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0answers
72 views

Branes at the conifold

Consider $N$ $D3$-branes at the singularity of the conifold. This particular example can be viewed as a $AdS_{5} \times T^{1,1}$ in the near horizon limit, where the Einstein manifold has isometry ...
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1answer
83 views

Are gauge theories always renormalizable?

Speaking of quantum field theories. Is one of the following implications correct? gauge theory (gauge invariant) => renormalizable renormalizable => gauge theory (gauge invariant) If yes do you ...
0
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0answers
42 views

Why gauge field should be vanishing on horizon?

When considering an AdS spacetime including a black hole, matter field and gauge field, the value of temporal component $A_t$ of the gauge potential $A_\mu$ on horizon always is set be zero, even the ...
6
votes
1answer
111 views

Is Elitzur's theorem valid only in lattice field theory?

Elitzur's theorem, stating that spontaneous breakdown of a gauge symmetry is impossible, was originally proved for a lattice gauge theory. Is it valid in continuum field theory? Any ref?
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On the Coulomb branch of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theory

The chiral ring of the Coulomb branch of a 4D $N=2$ supersymmetric gauge theory is given by the Casimirs of the vector multiplet scalars, and they don't have non-trivial relations; the Casimirs are ...
3
votes
2answers
343 views

What is conformal gauge?

I often see in physics articles on gravity such notion as conformal gauge and Weyl transformation. They use Conformal gauge to change coordinates to transform metrics from arbitrary $$ds^2=g_{\mu ...
69
votes
5answers
8k views

Gauge symmetry is not a symmetry?

I have read before in one of Seiberg's articles something like, that gauge symmetry is not a symmetry but a redundancy in our description, by introducing fake degrees of freedom to facilitate ...
0
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0answers
51 views

Counting Degrees of Freedom in Field Theories

I'm somewhat unsure about how we go about counting degrees of freedom in CFT, and in QFT. Often people talk about field theories as having 'infinite degrees of freedom'. My understanding of this is ...
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0answers
30 views

Changing variables in a Lagrangian to obtain mass terms of gauge fields [closed]

Context: In a excercise, consider a SU(2) gauge theory. The Lagrangian of the theory contains the three gauge fields and some scalar matter fields: $\phi_1 , \phi_2$ form a SU(2) doublet (fundamental ...
3
votes
0answers
125 views

Geometric interpretation of quantum Yang-Mills field

In most books\articles review geometric interpretation of classical Yang-Mills field in terms of principal bundle, connections...etc. What are geometric interpretation of quantum Yang-Mills field? ...
2
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2answers
90 views
2
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0answers
51 views

Are mass terms forbidden in the Lagrangian because of parity violation or because fermions live in a complex representation?

Normally one argues that we can't write down Lorentz AND gauge invariant mass terms, because of parity violation, i.e. l-chiral and r-chiral fields transform differently. This means that mass terms ...
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0answers
24 views

Covariant derivative of Noether current [closed]

I am working with a non-abelian gauge gauge theory that has one gauge field and a complex scalar field. I am supposed to prove that \begin{equation} (D_\mu j^\mu)^a=0, \end{equation} where ...
11
votes
2answers
401 views

Why are non-Abelian gauge theories Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically?

I seem to be missing something regarding why Yang-Mills theories are Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically. Start by considering QED. If we just study the physics of a massless $U(1)$ gauge field ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Showing closure of the SUSY algebra of a free abelian gauge multiplet

Given the complete supersymmetric lagrangian of a free abelian gauge multiplet $$ \mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4} F_{\mu\nu} F^{\mu\nu} + i \bar{\lambda} \bar{\sigma}^\mu \partial_\mu \lambda + \frac{1}{2} ...
1
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2answers
136 views

Elliptic genus; What is it within string/M-theory?

What is the elliptic genus (see also Witten index) in string/M-theory and (susy gauge)field theory constructions out of them? What does it tell us heuristically and what is its relation to the ...
3
votes
0answers
118 views

Effective field theories and gauge anomalies cancellation

Lets assume some theory which concludes sets of generations of fermions (lets call them $A$ and $B$). Fermions $A$ have some gauge group $G_{A}$ (for example, SM), while fermions $B$ are charged under ...
1
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1answer
71 views

Is gauge invariance essential to a theory be renormalizable?

Let's consider a model of New Physics in which all operator have dimension smaller than four, but which breaks explicitly $SU(2)_L$ gauge symmetry. Is this model necessarily renormalizable? ...
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2answers
69 views

Why gauge fields are traceless Hermitian?

So I've had a read of this, and I'm still not convinced as to why gauge fields are traceless and Hermitian. I follow the article fine, it's just the section that says "don't worry about this ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Commutator of Gauge Covariant derivatives

What is the physical meaning of $$ [D_{\mu}, D_{\nu}] ~\propto~ F_{\mu, \nu}, $$ where $D_{\mu}$ is the gauge covariant derivative and $F_{\mu,\nu}$ is the field strength? Is it just a definition? ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Why is the gauge potential $A_{\mu}$ in the Lie algebra of the gauge group $G$?

If we have a general gauge group whose action is $$ \Phi(x) \rightarrow g(x)\Phi(x), $$ with $g\in G$. Then introducing the gauge covariant derivative $$ D_{\mu}\Phi(x) = ...
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0answers
22 views

Wu experiment and masses of neutrino

Wu experiment have shown that there are only left-handed neutrinos (and right-handed antineutrinos) take part in weak interactions. My question is about the significance of this experiment in a ...