A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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885 views

Gauge Invariance of the Hamiltonian of the electromagnetic field

The Hamiltonian for an electron of mass $m$ and charge $e$ in an exterior electromagnetic field is $$H=\frac{1}{2m}(p-(e/c)A)^2+e\varphi.$$ The corresponding (via canonical quantization) quantum ...
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355 views

primary constraints for constrained Hamiltonian systems

I would be most thankful if you could help me clarify the setting of primary constraints for constrained Hamiltonian systems. I am reading "Classical and quantum dynamics of constrained Hamiltonian ...
3
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2answers
256 views

Why does the $\pi$-flux state have time-reversal symmetry?

It's known that the $\pi$-flux state of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the square lattice is an important concept. The $\pi$-flux state is described by the (simplified) mean-field ...
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1answer
199 views

A naive question on the Quantum Hall Effect(QHE) and the confinement in gauge theory?

The non-interacting 2D lattice QH system is described by the Hamiltonian $H=\sum t_{ij}e^{iA_{ij}}c_i^\dagger c_j+H.c$ My confusion is: Does this imply that the $2D$ lattice QHE is described by the ...
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3answers
163 views

A question about an identity in deriving Born-Infeld action

I have a question in David Tong's Example Sheet 4 Problem 5b, how to verify the last equation (*) on p.2? (There is a solution for example sheet 3, but seems to be no solution for example sheet 4.) ...
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1answer
142 views

Four-gauge-boson vertex in non-Abelian gauge theories

In Peskin & Schroeder's book page 524, the following diagram is calculated for the gauge boson self-energy in order $g^2$: In dimensional regularization, its contribution is given by ...
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1answer
722 views

Local and Global Symmetries

Could somebody point me in the direction of a mathematically rigorous definition local symmetries and global symmetries for a given (classical) field theory? Heuristically I know that global ...
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2answers
91 views

Utility of gauge four-potential $A_{\mu}$ (as opposed to electric and magnetic fields ${\bf E}$ and ${\bf B}$) in E&M?

The action for an electromagnetic field with source charges is given by $$S= \int \left\{ \frac{1}{4\mu_0}F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu} - J^\mu A_\mu \right\}dx$$ By setting $dS=0$ and taking the Lorenz ...
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110 views

Hyperkahler manifolds and their use in theoretical physics

Just as the title says: What is the easiest definition of a Hyperkahler Manifold? Could you give some examples of Hyperkahler manifolds, and manifolds which fail to be hyperkahler? Why are such ...
3
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1answer
130 views

Ghost Number Conservation

I've been reading about gauge theory quantization, and understand it mostly. The only thing I don't get is why people talk about "ghost number conservation". As far as I can tell, the ghost number is ...
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440 views

Potential energy in Special Relativity

In Special Relativity, the energy of a free particle is $E^2=p^2c^2+m^2c^4$. But what would be the energy when there is potential energy? If it's something like $E=\sqrt{p^2c^2+m^2c^4}+U$, what ...
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1answer
528 views

Gauss law in classical U(1) gauge theory

I can see that $a_{0}$ is not an independent field and Gauss law is a constraint on the theory arising from field equations. But, I don't get the geometrical picture. Let $A$ be the space of all ...
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1answer
43 views

How do we know what type of gauge field to add to a theory?

I've been watching Leonard Susskind's particle physics lectures and in one lecture, he discusses a very simple gauge theory. We have a complex scalar field $\phi(x)$ with Lagrangian $$\mathscr{L} = ...
3
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1answer
83 views

Yang-Mills Lagrangian invariant under BRST

In equation 16.47 in Peskin & Schroeder, it is claimed that $$ -\frac{1}{2}g^2f^{abc}f^{cde}\left(A_{\mu}\,^{b}c^{d}c^{e}+A_{\mu}\,^{d}c^{e}c^{b}+A_{\mu}\,^{e}c^{b}c^{d}\right) ~=~ 0 \tag{16.47}$$ ...
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1answer
280 views

The theory of strings stretching between intersecting D-branes

I am trying to understand various aspects of intersecting D-branes in terms of the gauge theories on the worldvolume of the D-branes. One thing I'd like to understand is the worldvolume action for ...
3
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1answer
239 views

Does spontanous symmetry breaking affect Noethers theorem?

Does spontanous symmetry breaking affect the existence of a conserved charge? And how does depend on whether we look at a classical or a quantum field theory (e.g. the weak interacting theory)? ...
3
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1answer
246 views

A loop quantum gravity toy inspired by an Aharonov-Bohm ring

Comparing my question to Give a description of Loop Quantum Gravity your grandmother could understand what I'm looking for here is a toy for a toddler ($\approx$ a pre-QFT graduate student). I seek ...
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1answer
33 views

The differences of R parity and $U(1)_R$ symmetry

I know that we introduce R-parity to avoid proton decay. But some papers introduce $U(1)_R$ Lepton Number, e.g claudia, thomas. I have questions 1.What is the differences of R parity and $U(1)_R$? ...
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1answer
85 views

Clarifications needed on Gauge Fixing and Ghosts [closed]

The first time some kind of gauge fixing appears is during the Gupta-Bleuler procedure, which is used to be able to quantize the photon field: The basic gauge invariant Lagrangian leads to $\Pi_0=0$ ...
3
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1answer
79 views

How can Maxwell theory be viewed in terms of two-layer structure?

I'm trying to learn more about Maxwell equations and stumbled upon an essay by professor Freeman J. Dyson from Princeton. He explained Maxwell theory in a very interesting way. The modem view of ...
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1answer
142 views

What are type system examples of local gauge transformation- and field strength-like objects?

This is essentially a follow up motivated by this answer to my question about the gauge transformation interpretation of identity types. A field $$\psi:\mathcal M\to\mathbb C^n$$ is a section of the ...
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2answers
224 views

The meaning of potential in Bohm-Aharonov experiment

The Bohm-Aharonov experiment involves a magnetic field inside a cylinder which is zero outside that cylinder. Nonetheless it affects the electrons moving outside the cylinder. The explanation for this ...
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1answer
102 views

Are the symmetry operators well defined in the context of Projective Symmetry Group(PSG)?

Consider the Schwinger-fermion approach $\mathbf{S}_i=\frac{1}{2}f_i^\dagger\mathbf{\sigma}f_i$ to spin-$\frac{1}{2}$ system on 2D lattices. Just as Prof.Wen said in his seminal paper on PSG, the ...
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1answer
326 views

About the gauge invariance of Chern-Simons' theory (in local coordinates)

I am aware of the differential form language proof of the fact that for arbitrary gauge transformations the Chern-Simons' term shifts by a WZW term (on the boundary). But I am getting confused if ...
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1answer
209 views

For nonabelian Yang-Mills in the Coulomb phase, can soft gluons render the charge orientation of charged particles indefinite?

For nonabelian Yang-Mills in the Coulomb phase, can soft gluons render the charge orientation of charged particles indefinite? Let's say the gauge group is a nonabelian simple Lie group G. Suppose ...
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2answers
137 views

What exactly is the weak portion of the SM gauge group?

This Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left%E2%80%93right_symmetry states that the weak part of the SM gauge group is not $SU(2)_L \times U(1)_Y$ but $ \frac{ SU(2)_L \times ...
3
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1answer
225 views

Using the covariant derivative to find force between 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopoles

I am reading this research paper authored by NS Manton on the Force between 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles. I have a doubt in equation 3.6 and 3.7. We assume the gauge field for a slowly accelerating ...
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2answers
470 views

What is the ontological status of Faddeev Popov ghosts?

We all know Faddeev-Popov ghosts are needed in manifestly Lorentz covariant nonabelian quantum gauge theories. We also all know they decouple from the rest of matter asymptotically, although they ...
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0answers
42 views

How the number of charges (colors) and the number of photons (gluons) is connected?

This question is a continuation of "Can a third type of electrical charge exist?" and specifically this comment. I know the common knowledge that there is 1 kind of electric charge and thus 1 kind of ...
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65 views

Getting Slavnov-Taylor identity

Let's have generating functional in path integral form for gauge $SU(n)$ theory with interaction: $$ \tag 1 Z[J] = \int DB D\bar{\Psi}D\Psi D\bar{c}Dc e^{iS}. $$ Here $$ S = S_{YM}(B, \partial B) + ...
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76 views

Naive questions on the classical equations of motion from the Chern-Simons Lagrangian

Consider a Chern-Simons Lagrangian $\mathscr{L}=\mathbf{e}^2-b^2+g\epsilon^{\mu \nu \lambda} a_\mu\partial _\nu a_\lambda$ in 2+1 dimensions, where the 'electromagnetic' fields are $e_i=\partial ...
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78 views

Complex scalar fields conserved charges

I'm currently studying field theory and I'm having some trouble with conserved charge given in field components. If we have a complex scalar action of a field $\phi=(\phi_1,\phi_2)^T$ that is ...
3
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0answers
75 views

Why is general relativity considered to be a gauge theory? [duplicate]

I have studied the first five chapters of Carroll's book (up to the Schwarzschild solution). I see similarities to the Yang-Mill theories such as the covariant derivative to account for curvature in ...
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0answers
41 views

Quiver and Gauge theory

i want to know how to construct a quiver of a Gauge theory specified by groupe g with rank=r ?
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101 views

Large gauge transformations for higher p-form gauge fields

Question: What is the large gauge transformations for higher p-form gauge field on a spatial d-dimensional torus $T^d$ or a generic (compact) manifold $M$? for p=1,2,3, etc or any other integers. Is ...
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136 views

Does the projected spin state of the $d+id$ mean-field Hamiltonian on a triangular lattice has time-reversal(TR) symmetry?

Consider the following $d+id$ mean-field Hamiltonian for a spin-1/2 model on a triangular lattice $$H=\sum_{<ij>}(\psi_i^\dagger\chi_{ij}\psi_j+H.c.)$$, with $\chi_{ij}=\begin{pmatrix} 0 & ...
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0answers
52 views

$\mathcal{N}=4$ SUSY in $d=3$ versus $\mathcal{N}=2$ in $d=4$

Which is the field content of the hypermultiplet and the vector multiplet in $\mathcal{N}=4 \ d=3$ Supersymmmetry? Is it correct to state that $\mathcal{N}=4$ in $d=3$ has $8$ supercharges, (since ...
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111 views

Moduli Space of $\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM on $\mathbb{R} \times S^3$

When we define $\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM on flat Minkowski space, the supersymmetric vacua are parametrized by scalars living in the cartan subalgebra of the gauge group. A generic point in the moduli space ...
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86 views

Do primary first class constraints change the electric field in the Hamiltonian form of Maxwell's theory?

In my understanding of Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonians, the primary (and also the secondary) first class constraints are generators of canonical transformations that do not change the ...
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95 views

Why does global supersymmetry commute with gauge transformations?

In particular, I would like to understand the following quotation from a paper by Witten: Nucl.Phys. B188 (1981) 513 (p. 515 at the top) His statement: This is so because in global supersymmetry ...
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49 views

Holomorphic coupling as a source for gaugino condensation

On the top of page 23 of hep-th/03061119, it is pointed out that treating the holomorphic gauge coupling $\tau$ as a background (spurion) superfield allows one to think of its $F$-term, $F_\tau$ as ...
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0answers
68 views

Does the ensemble of effective Lagrangians in the String theory landscape mostly include gauge theories?

String theory false vacua can be described by effective Lagrangians at low energy. Is there generally a correspondence between these effective Lagrangians and SU(N) gauge theories? Or do the effective ...
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49 views

Attractiveness of spin 2 gauge theories [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is gravitation force always attractive? I have heard that the attractiveness of gravitation is due to the fact that it is a spin 2 gauge theory. Why is this so? I ...
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199 views

Pseudo scalar mass and Pure scalar mass

Since the only difference between pseudo scalar and a scalar term is just a change of sign under a parity inversion, is it possible that both of them be present in the same field and interact? For ...
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126 views

Derivation of the enhancement of U(1)$_L$ x U(1)$_R$ to SU(2)$_L$ x SU(2)$_R$ at the self-dual radius

Towards the end of the paragraph with the title String theory's added value 2: enhanced non-Abelian symmetries at self-dual radii and abstract C with current algebras of this article, it is explained ...
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185 views

Attempts to explain Higgs coupling as a gauge transformation symmetry

As is (supposedly) well known, Electromagnetic coupling can be "explained" as a closure term to a langrangian comprising a free Dirac field and a free vector field that are required to be invariant ...
2
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1answer
115 views

What exactly is a gauge anomaly?

In lots of papers I read about gauge anomalies. For example, avoiding gauge anamolies in the MSSM is the reason for introducing an extra Higgs doublet. Gauge anamolies in the Standard Model are ...
2
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2answers
267 views

What evidence is there for the electroweak higgs mechanism?

The wikipedia article on the Higgs mechanism states that there is overwhelming evidence for the electroweak higgs mechanism, but doesn't then back this up. What evidence is there?
2
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2answers
264 views

Is the artificial gauge field a gauge field?

The so-called artificial gauge fields are actually the Berry connection. They could be $U(1)$ or $SU(N)$ which depends on the level degeneracy. For simplicity, let's focus on $U(1)$ artificial gauge ...
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1answer
116 views

$SU(2)$ gauge symmetry

Take the Lagrangian with one fermion: $$ \mathcal{L} = -\frac{1}{4}F^{\mu\nu}_aF^a_{\mu\nu} + \bar{\psi}(i\gamma^\mu D_\mu - m)\psi$$ where the gauge covariant derivative $D_\mu = ...