A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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1answer
97 views

Are all elementary interactions arising from a gauge theory?

The standard model of particle physics is based on the gauge group $U(1) \times SU(2) \times SU(3)$ and describes all well-known physical interactions but with exception that gravity isn't involved. ...
5
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1answer
140 views

Transformation Law for Covariant Derivative in $SU(2)$ Yang-Mills

In page 488 of Peskin and Schroeder, it is stated (emphasis mine): It is not difficult to check using (15.27) and (15.21) that, even for finite transformations, the covariant derivative has the ...
1
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1answer
47 views

Transformations of electroweak gauge field $W_\mu$ under $U(1)_{e.m.}$

As the vector boson field $W_\mu$ is, together with $Z^0$, the gauge field for the Standard electroweak model, I know it transforms as a connection under the $SU(2)\times U(1)_Y$ group. But, when this ...
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2answers
90 views

The notion of fixing a gauge

I don't understand the notion of gauge fixing; can we choose any gauge or are there some restrictions? For example why can we choose $\nabla\phi = 0$ here: Determine the Electric field using ...
4
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1answer
87 views

Why is $U(1)$ special when defining global charges?

For gauge groups like $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ etc. we know that observable states such as mesons or baryons must be charge neutral. However, for a $U(1)$ gauge group we can have charged initial states in ...
2
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1answer
71 views

Origin of integral of field strength tensor in path-ordered exponential in gauge field theory

When studying some gauge theories approach to problems in Mechanics, I've found the following integral $$P\exp\left[\oint A \ dt\right]=1+\dfrac{1}{2}\oint_{\partial ...
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0answers
91 views

Branes at the conifold

Consider $N$ $D3$-branes at the singularity of the conifold. This particular example can be viewed as a $AdS_{5} \times T^{1,1}$ in the near horizon limit, where the Einstein manifold has isometry ...
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1answer
167 views

Are gauge theories always renormalizable?

Speaking of quantum field theories. Is one of the following implications correct? gauge theory (gauge invariant) => renormalizable renormalizable => gauge theory (gauge invariant) If yes do you ...
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0answers
58 views

Why gauge field should be vanishing on horizon?

When considering an AdS spacetime including a black hole, matter field and gauge field, the value of temporal component $A_t$ of the gauge potential $A_\mu$ on horizon always is set be zero, even the ...
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2answers
722 views

What is conformal gauge?

I often see in physics articles on gravity such notion as conformal gauge and Weyl transformation. They use Conformal gauge to change coordinates to transform metrics from arbitrary $$ds^2=g_{\mu ...
87
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5answers
10k views

Gauge symmetry is not a symmetry?

I have read before in one of Seiberg's articles something like, that gauge symmetry is not a symmetry but a redundancy in our description, by introducing fake degrees of freedom to facilitate ...
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0answers
379 views

Counting Degrees of Freedom in Field Theories

I'm somewhat unsure about how we go about counting degrees of freedom in CFT, and in QFT. Often people talk about field theories as having 'infinite degrees of freedom'. My understanding of this is ...
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0answers
180 views

Geometric interpretation of quantum Yang-Mills field

In most books\articles review geometric interpretation of classical Yang-Mills field in terms of principal bundle, connections...etc. What are geometric interpretation of quantum Yang-Mills field? ...
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2answers
106 views
2
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0answers
81 views

Are mass terms forbidden in the Lagrangian because of parity violation or because fermions live in a complex representation?

Normally one argues that we can't write down Lorentz AND gauge invariant mass terms, because of parity violation, i.e. l-chiral and r-chiral fields transform differently. This means that mass terms ...
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2answers
553 views

Why are non-Abelian gauge theories Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically?

I seem to be missing something regarding why Yang-Mills theories are Lorentz invariant quantum mechanically. Start by considering QED. If we just study the physics of a massless $U(1)$ gauge field ...
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2answers
374 views

Elliptic genus; What is it within string/M-theory?

What is the elliptic genus (see also Witten index) in string/M-theory and (susy gauge)field theory constructions out of them? What does it tell us heuristically and what is its relation to the ...
3
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0answers
304 views

Effective field theories and gauge anomalies cancellation

Lets assume some theory which concludes sets of generations of fermions (lets call them $A$ and $B$). Fermions $A$ have some gauge group $G_{A}$ (for example, SM), while fermions $B$ are charged under ...
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0answers
114 views

Is gauge invariance essential to a theory be renormalizable?

Let's consider a model of New Physics in which all operator have dimension smaller than four, but which breaks explicitly $SU(2)_L$ gauge symmetry. Is this model necessarily renormalizable? ...
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2answers
131 views

Why gauge fields are traceless Hermitian?

So I've had a read of this, and I'm still not convinced as to why gauge fields are traceless and Hermitian. I follow the article fine, it's just the section that says "don't worry about this ...
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1answer
209 views

Commutator of Gauge Covariant derivatives

What is the physical meaning of $$ [D_{\mu}, D_{\nu}] ~\propto~ F_{\mu, \nu}, $$ where $D_{\mu}$ is the gauge covariant derivative and $F_{\mu,\nu}$ is the field strength? Is it just a definition? ...
3
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1answer
120 views

Why is the gauge potential $A_{\mu}$ in the Lie algebra of the gauge group $G$?

If we have a general gauge group whose action is $$ \Phi(x) \rightarrow g(x)\Phi(x), $$ with $g\in G$. Then introducing the gauge covariant derivative $$ D_{\mu}\Phi(x) = ...
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0answers
32 views

Wu experiment and masses of neutrino

Wu experiment have shown that there are only left-handed neutrinos (and right-handed antineutrinos) take part in weak interactions. My question is about the significance of this experiment in a ...
2
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1answer
184 views

About states, observables and the wave functional interpretation in QFT with gauge fields

First of all, I'm a mathematician, so forgive me for my possible trivial mistakes and poor knowledge of physics. In a QFT, we just start with a field (scalar, vectorial, spinorial, gauge etc), so I ...
2
votes
2answers
379 views

What are global and local gauge invariance defined as they are?

I'm sorry for the triviality of my questions. Why is $\bar{\psi} = e^{i \theta}\bar{\psi}$, where $\theta$ is a real number, used as the global gauge transformation? Why $e^{i \theta}$; what's the ...
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0answers
72 views

Advantages of having a first class system and possibility of transforming a system into a first class one

I have two questions regarding first class systems. What are the advantages of having a first class Hamiltonian (a Hamiltonian whose all constraints are first class) in a theory or having a first ...
4
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1answer
205 views

Does the projected spin state of the $d+id$ mean-field Hamiltonian on a triangular lattice has time-reversal(TR) symmetry?

Consider the following $d+id$ mean-field Hamiltonian for a spin-1/2 model on a triangular lattice $$H=\sum_{<ij>}(\psi_i^\dagger\chi_{ij}\psi_j+H.c.)$$, with $\chi_{ij}=\begin{pmatrix} 0 & ...
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2answers
165 views

Vanishing of conjugate momentum $\Pi^0$ and non-existence of propagator

We know that if we try to quantize the free electromagnetic field without a gauge fixing term added to the Lagrangian, then one of the conjugate momentum density $\Pi^0$ vanishes. We also find that ...
3
votes
1answer
286 views

Question on derivation of Ward identity

I'm currently reading these notes about the Ward identity (pages 259 - 261). I will repeat some of the steps to make the question self-contained. Let us consider a local transformation on the field ...
4
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0answers
68 views

Transformation law for field strength tensor [closed]

How do I derive the transformation law for the field strength tensor$$F_{\mu\nu}^A = \partial_\mu V_\nu^A - \partial_\nu V_\mu^A - gC_{BC}^A V_\mu^B V_\nu^C$$to show that it transforms like a vector ...
6
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1answer
72 views

Independent Phases in Gauge Theory

Excuse my naivety. When we postulate a local gauge invariance we say that we allow the overall phase of the field variables $\psi(x)$ can be changed and that this overall phase can vary from point to ...
6
votes
2answers
298 views

Gauge invariance and Bohm-Aharonov effect

I am confused with the Bohm-Aharonov effect: though quantum mechanics is said to be gauge invariant, the presence of a solenoid imposes a gauge. I used to think that a phase shift did not change ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Charge loop corrections

Let's assume some theory in which there is some gauge group (spontaneously broken) field $B$ and fermion field $b$ which isn't charged under this group, and this statement must hold for each order of ...
3
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1answer
85 views

What is the phase of a gauge coupling?

We typically take gauge couplings to be real and positive. Why do we impose these two conditions? I assume this is a requirement because gauge theories without positive couplings are unphysical or is ...
26
votes
1answer
687 views

How does the Super-Kamiokande experiment falsify SU(5)?

In his book "The Trouble With Physics", Lee Smolin writes that he is still stunned by the falsification of the $SU(5)$ Georgi-Glashow model by the null results of proton decay experiments. I should ...
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0answers
68 views

A question on intermediate step in deriving gravitational anomaly by Fujikawa's method

In Fujikawa's 'Path integrals and Quantum Anomalies', Eq.(10.26) in the derivation of gravitational anomaly in Chapter 10.1 is puzzling for me. ...
1
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2answers
136 views

Gauge transformation of Lagrangian

Suppose I have a Lagrangian density $\mathcal{L}(\phi^\mu,\sigma)$ depending on vector fields $\phi^\mu$ and their derivatives and a scalar field $\sigma$ and its derivatives. If I make a gauge ...
1
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1answer
172 views

Is there a mistake in a QFT textbook?

I tried to calculate one of the problems in the textbook Gauge Theory of Elementary Particle Physics by Ta-Pei Cheng and Ling-Fong Li. On page 248 you can find the following calculation of a loop ...
2
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1answer
161 views

Why do we have to choose a gauge to quantize a gauge theory?

Why do we have to choose a gauge to quantize a gauge theory? This was an exam question but I couldn't answer it.
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0answers
38 views

Vertex of gauge boson interaction in an arbitrary gauge

Let's have interaction between some gauge boson (for example, $W$ boson) and some other field, for example, let assume $\bar{u}\gamma_{\mu}(1 - \gamma_{5})d W^{\mu} + h.c.$. Let's then use gauge ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

transformations between 1st and 2nd order formalism in pure gravity

I am currently studying about 1st order formalism and I was wandering if the gauge transformation in the vielbein can be mapped to the coordinate transformation of the metric ( pure 2+1 gravity), ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

Under what cases is the Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) operator nilpotent?

It is understood that when we deal with gauge algebras which close on-shell only after using equations of motion or where the space-time is curved, we can no longer just do away with BRST ...
3
votes
1answer
270 views

Lapse and shift in ADM decomposition

Poisson in Relativist's Toolkit and also other authors in various papers state explicitly that after one does the 3+1 decomposition, the lapse and shift $N$ and $N^a$ are non-dynamical variables, and ...
2
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1answer
131 views

Clarification: Why the gauge symmetry of pure Yang-Mills is $PU(n)$ and not $SU(n)$? [closed]

I am quoting the following from the Wikipedia article on the projective unitary group: In the pure Yang–Mills $SU(n)$ gauge theory, which is a gauge theory with only gluons and no fundamental ...
3
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2answers
398 views

Two puzzles on the Projective Symmetry Group(PSG)?

Recently I'm studying PSG and I felt very puzzled about two statements appeared in Wen's paper. To present the questions clearly, imagine that we use the Shwinger-fermion ...
2
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2answers
272 views

Chern Simons action in 4 dimensions

I can not understand why we do not have a Chern-Cimons action for 4 or even forms? And why it not good theory for (3+1) dim?
0
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1answer
117 views

Does the flatness of a gauge field has anything to do with whether it's dynamical?

One common way in studying Symmetry Protected Topological(SPT) phases with a global symmetry G is to promote G to a gauge symmetry and couple the system to a flat gauge field A for G. Then one can ...
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0answers
64 views

Custodial symmetry and Higgs-Kibble

In the context of Higgs mechanism only on $SU(2)_L$ model without the hypercharge, one writes the lagrangian with traces also for the Higgs, i.e. $$ \cdots+\text{Tr}[(D_\mu H)^\dagger D^\mu ...
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0answers
41 views

Parker-Taylor formula in the $n=4$ simple case

I am trying to do ex. 2.23 of http://arxiv.org/pdf/1308.1697v2.pdf. I have chosen as reference spinors $q_1,q_2 = p_3$ and $q_3,q_4 = p_1$. Therefore if I compute $A^4[1^- 2^- 3^+ 4^+]$ the ...
6
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0answers
120 views

Intuition for Homological Mirror Symmetry

first of all, I need to confess my ignorance with respect to any physics since I'm a mathematician. I'm interested in the physical intuition of the Langlands program, therefore I need to understand ...