A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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Is it strictly necessary to require gauge invariance of the action and equations of motion?

When writing down an action for a gauge theory, we require that the action be gauge invariant. This is typically taken to mean that the action must be written explicitly in terms of gauge invariant ...
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57 views

Phase diagram of gauge + matter theories

I am looking for some notes/reviews on confinement and Higgs phases suitable for Fermionic/Bosonic matter coupled to Abelian ($Z_2$ or $U(1)$ etc) gauge fields. The purpose is to understand issues ...
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116 views

Charge not conserved in scalar QED? [duplicate]

Since conservation of charge seems to be a well known concept, I am hoping that I am missing something and that the conclusion is incorrect. However, I have been unable to disprove this. Let me ...
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293 views

Polarization Sums in QCD for the calculation of parton model splitting functions

Before i state the actual problem, here's a premise. In the case of a Spin 1 massive particle it's possible to demonstrate that $$\sum_{\lambda=0,\pm1}\epsilon_{\lambda}^{* \ ...
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75 views

Do lattice gauge theories with discrete gauge groups have sensible continuum limits?

In lattice gauge theories the only gauge invariant observables are constructed from Wilson loops and local field strength observables are reconstructed as zero size limits of Wilson loops. Furthermore ...
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133 views

Dyon condensation and generalized Meissner effect

In section 2.B of Metlitski and Vishwanath's paper: "Generally condensation of a dyon with charges $(q,m)$ gives rise to an analogue of a Meissner effect for the gauge field combination ...
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28 views

Vector potential in gauge transformation

While applying Gauge transformation, $\psi\prime = U \psi$ , where $ U= e^{i q \lambda(x)}$ , transformation law for "Vector Potential" comes out to be : $$ A_{\mu}\prime= ...
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154 views

Is there any $SU(\infty)$ gauge theory in quantum field theory?

The groups $U(N)$ and $SU(N)$ are the most important Lie groups in quantum field theory. The most popular are the $U(1),SU(2),SU(3)$ groups (these gauge groups form the Standard model). But is there ...
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85 views

A question to gauge fixing in nonabelian gauge theories

In quantum gauge theories it is usual to fix the gauge with the equation $\partial^\mu A_\mu = 0$ where $A_\mu$ is the gauge connection. From this gauge fixing condition the remaining gauge degree of ...
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63 views

About equivalence of two ways of “derivation” of Standard model

Two ways of SM derivation I know two methods of SM lagrangian "derivation". The first one, which I will call as Weinberg way, is based on approaches of SM as theory with spontaneusly broken ...
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36 views

Properties of vector potential

Given the definition of vector potential as, $ A_{\mu}= \sum_{k} \partial_{\mu}\theta F^{k}$ , where F are the generators and $\theta$ are the parameters of the symmetry group. I have two questions ...
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Gauge transformation and Special relativity

While explaining gauge theories, a book makes a comment that the U(1) transformation definition, $ U= e^{i q \lambda(x)}$ is analogous to a special relativity transformation in freely falling ...
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147 views

When do gauge theories have protected gapless excitations?

Goldstone's theorem states that a system in which a continuous symmetry is spontaneously broken necessarily has gapless excitations. (A hand-waving "proof" of Goldstone's theorem can be given by ...
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Expansion of non-abelian heat kernel operator $Q$

For abelain $U(1)$ gauge theory ($F_{\mu\nu} = \partial_\mu A_\nu - \partial_\nu A_\mu$) we can expand heat kernel operator $Q$ as \begin{align} Q &= -(\partial - iA)^2 + m^2 \\ & = - ...
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49 views

Effect of orbifolding on form ields

A paper by Lalak et al, entitled "Soliton Solutions of M-theory on an orbifold", considers the brane solutions of 11 dimensional supergravity on a space of the form $R^{10} \times S^1/\mathbb{Z}_2$. ...
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19 views

Are correlators constructed out of Wilson loops singular in pure Yang-Mills?

If I have some gauge invariant function of two Wilson loops (such as $\left<\text{Tr}W_1 \text{Tr}W_2\right>$) does the expectation value diverge when the loops coincide the same way ...
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57 views

$U(1)$ gauge symmetry in superfluid

The conventional superfluid phase in a Bose-Hubbard ground state has $U(1)$ symmetry. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the superfluid ground state has non-uniform phases. Why do people in ...
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265 views

How to include Berry connection in Hamiltonian?

When we calculate Berry connection, $A(R)=i<\psi(x,y)|\frac{d}{dR}|\psi(x,y)>\hat{R}$ corresponding to the Berry phase of any system, the gauge potential is related to the $R$ of the parameter ...
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Is there some no-go theorem for $D=9$ Kaluza Klein QCD+EM?

While QCD is a typical product of AdS/CFT and some other research trends in extra dimensions, I have never found in the literature an example producing the non-chiral part of the standard model, ...
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71 views

Is local chiral symmetry qualitatively the same as gauge symmetries?

I am confused by the role that local chiral symmetry plays in chiral perturbation theory. For the case of chiral QCD with three quark flavors, the Lagrangian is invariant under global ...
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169 views

Georgi-Glashow model and the VEV of the scalar field

Consider the Georgi-Glashow model, an $SU(2)$ gauge theory with a real scalar in the adjoint (thus a 3-vector in the colour space) $\phi$. The Lagrangian is $$ L = -\frac{1}{4g^2} F_{\mu \nu}^{\, a} ...
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459 views

Non-inertial frames in Lagrangian mechanics?

Building on this Phys.SE post I am interested in how non-inertial frames can be considered in Lagrangian mechanics. My understanding is that changing the reference frame causes a transformation of the ...
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97 views

How to write the Lagrangian in terms of a projection

We know that $$ L=\frac{1}{2}\left(\partial_{\mu} A_{\nu} \partial^{\mu} A^{\nu}-\partial_{\mu} A_{\nu} \partial^{\nu} A^{\mu}\right) $$ But how do we write the Lagrangian in the following way: ...
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60 views

Coupling an electric charge to a gauge field. How is it done in this setup?

In page 9 of Tachikawa's N=2 susy dynamics for pedestrians it says that an electric particle with charge $n$ in the first quantised setup (in what sense first quantised?), Wick rotated to Euclidean ...
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93 views

Dimensional reduction of SUSY theories

I know that if one reduces 10 dimensional $\mathcal{N}=1$ SYM theory to 4 dimensions one gets $\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM. There are other examples also. I have two related questions regarding this fact. ...
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171 views

Consequences of local and global anomaly

Are the physical consequences of anomalies associated with a local symmetry is different from that of a global symmetry? If yes, why? We have global anomaly in the standard model but not local ...
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98 views

Is EM interpreted in a principal or vector bundle?

I've read in a few places that EM is a $U(1)$-principal bundle; but is this correct? Isn't it rather an associated vector bundle using the adjoint representation of $U(1)$?
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Massive Gauge Bosons without Higgs Effect

In a possible theory like our Standard model but without a Higgs i.e.: $$ \mathcal{L}=i\bar{\Psi}_f\gamma_\mu D^\mu\Psi_f-\text{Tr}[G^b_{\mu\nu}G^{b\,\mu\nu}] $$ where $b,f$ run over the typical ...
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38 views

Gluon have colour-anticolour; what about weak bosons?

Gluons can be red-antiblue, or green-antired, etc. What about weak interaction bosons? (Say before symmetry breaking, to make matters simpler.) Is there a similar "weak charge" structure of ...
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How are quadruple gluon vertices related to $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$?

I once read that the non-commutativity of the Lie Groups $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ is the reason that the weak and strong interactions have Feynman diagrams with quadruple vertices, where four gauge bosons ...
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435 views

How do gauge boson interact with elementary particles?

We know that gauge bosons are the force carriers of fundamental interactions, but how do the gauge bosons themselves interact with particles?
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261 views

Is Elitzur's theorem valid only in lattice field theory?

Elitzur's theorem, stating that spontaneous breakdown of a gauge symmetry is impossible, was originally proved for a lattice gauge theory. Is it valid in continuum field theory? Any ref?
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75 views

Are the pion fields in chiral perturbation theory complex or real fields?

The chiral perturbation theory Lagrangian is written $$\mathcal{L}_2=\frac{f_{\pi}^2}{4}Tr(D_{\mu}U^{\dagger}D^{\mu}U)$$ where $$U=e^{i\sqrt{2}\Phi/f}$$ and $$\Phi= \begin{pmatrix} ...
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88 views

Why must superpartners have the same gauge quantum numbers?

The title leaves it quite clear, why must superpartners have the same gauge quantum numbers?
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How does the Higgs field relate to the Yang-Mills fields and gauge theories in general?

I asked this in astronomy How does the Higgs field relate to the Yang-Mills fields and gauge theories in general? but they suggested I ask it here. It is very confusing. Is there an easy ...
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92 views

Mathematician learning theoretical physics [duplicate]

EDIT: I was aware of the supposed duplicate. But I'm interested in a clear and focused path through the basics to advanced theoretical physics such as string theory - a path that avoids studying ...
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76 views

Gauge freedom in tetrad

I asked the question in the MathOverflow, but didn't get any response. I thought maybe better luck here. I'm reading the following paper about Petrov type D space times called "Type D vacuum ...
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68 views

How to check if some term in the Lagrangian involving gauge bosons is gauge invariant without explicit computations?

Normally (for fermions and scalars) we can simply use the decomposition of tensor products of gauge group representations to find invariant terms that we can write into the Lagrangian. For example ...
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129 views

Do gauge bosons really transform according to the adjoint representation of the gauge group?

Its commonly said that gauge bosons transform according to the adjoint representation of the corresponding gauge group. For example, for $SU(2)$ the gauge bosons live in the adjoint $3$ dimensional ...
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Bianchi identity of a non-Abelian gauge theory?

How can one prove the Bianchi identity of a non-Abelian gauge theory? i.e. $$ \epsilon_{\mu \nu \lambda \sigma}(D_{\nu}F_{\lambda \sigma})^a=0 $$
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684 views

Vector Potential for Magnetic field when the field is not in simply-connected region

According to Poincare's Lemma, if $U\subset \mathbb{R}^n$ is a star-shaped set and if $\omega$ is a $k$-form defined in $U$ that is closed, then $\omega$ is exact, meaning that there's some ...
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165 views

Why is the electromagnetic four-potential $A_{\mu}$ not an observable?

Why within classical field-theory the electromagnetic four-potential (usually $A_{\mu}$) not an observable? In classical mechanics we don't have problems with energy measurements and in quantum ...
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AdS/CFT-duality: How does the $U(1)$ decouple form the $U(N)$?

A stack of N coincident D3-branes on its world-volume describe, at the lowest order in $\alpha'$ and in absence of non-trivial background fields, a supersymmetric $U(N)$ gauge theory as explained in ...
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528 views

Is electric charge truly conserved for bosonic matter?

Even before quantization, charged bosonic fields exhibit a certain "self-interaction". The body of this post demonstrates this fact, and the last paragraph asks the question. Notation/ Lagrangians ...
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97 views

Are all elementary interactions arising from a gauge theory?

The standard model of particle physics is based on the gauge group $U(1) \times SU(2) \times SU(3)$ and describes all well-known physical interactions but with exception that gravity isn't involved. ...
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140 views

Transformation Law for Covariant Derivative in $SU(2)$ Yang-Mills

In page 488 of Peskin and Schroeder, it is stated (emphasis mine): It is not difficult to check using (15.27) and (15.21) that, even for finite transformations, the covariant derivative has the ...
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Transformations of electroweak gauge field $W_\mu$ under $U(1)_{e.m.}$

As the vector boson field $W_\mu$ is, together with $Z^0$, the gauge field for the Standard electroweak model, I know it transforms as a connection under the $SU(2)\times U(1)_Y$ group. But, when this ...
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90 views

The notion of fixing a gauge

I don't understand the notion of gauge fixing; can we choose any gauge or are there some restrictions? For example why can we choose $\nabla\phi = 0$ here: Determine the Electric field using ...
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Why is $U(1)$ special when defining global charges?

For gauge groups like $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ etc. we know that observable states such as mesons or baryons must be charge neutral. However, for a $U(1)$ gauge group we can have charged initial states in ...
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71 views

Origin of integral of field strength tensor in path-ordered exponential in gauge field theory

When studying some gauge theories approach to problems in Mechanics, I've found the following integral $$P\exp\left[\oint A \ dt\right]=1+\dfrac{1}{2}\oint_{\partial ...