A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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89 views

Why does the state space contain states with negative norm and what would be an example?

My lecture script of Quantum Field Theory states that " the state space contains states with negative norm ". Why does it have to be like this and what would be an example fo such a state?
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105 views

No local degrees of freedom when connection is flat

I was studying Chern-Simons theory and variation of action gives us the flatness conditions $\mathrm{d} A + A \wedge A = 0$. I am wondering how to see that this implies there are no local degrees of ...
5
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320 views

Field strength vanishes iff $A_{\mu}$ is pure gauge

Is it true that the field strength $F_{\mu\nu}$ in a non-Abelian gauge theory with gauge group $G$ vanishes if, and only if, the gauge field $A_{\mu}$ is a pure gauge? I can show one implication. ...
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39 views

Using local U(1) Transformation to solve Problem in Path Integral [duplicate]

When we develop photon path integral, we assume that the current is always conserved. But if we consider interaction between electron/positron and photon, the Noether current is conserved only when ...
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2answers
90 views

Independent components in a 4-vector representing massless fields

In Ryder Page141, it is written "the electromagnetic field, like any massless field, possesses only two independent components, but is covariantly described by a 4-vector $A_{\mu}$". Why are there ...
7
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471 views

Why mass terms are forbidden?

I would like to clarify my understanding on why mass terms in Lagrangians of gauge theories are forbidden. It's often repeated that particle masses are forbidden by electroweak symmetry because it is ...
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1answer
165 views

General relativity: gauge fixing

In his lectures professor Hamber said that the metric tensor is not unique, just like the 4 vector potential is not unique for a unique field in electrodynamics. Since the metric tensor is symmetric, ...
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1answer
121 views

Variational derivatives of strongly connected diagrams functional in gauge theory

Background In Jorge C. Romao's "Advanced Quantum Field Theory", at the end of page 218, Eq (6.266) reads: $$\tag{1} \left.\frac{\delta^{2}}{\delta \omega^{b}(y)\delta A_{\mu}^{c}(z)}\left[ ...
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33 views

Equations of motion with replacing the Lagrangian by irrep diagrams generating functional

I have read that equations of motion of ghosts is equal to $$ \tag 1 \frac{\delta \Gamma}{\delta \bar{c}^{a}(x)} = -\partial^{\mu}_{x}\frac{\delta \Gamma}{\delta K^{\mu , a}(x)}, $$ where $\Gamma = W ...
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0answers
55 views

Momentum operator of a particle in an electromagnetic field

In quantum mechanics, to all observables correspond some self-adjoint operators. In the absence of an electromagnetic field the momentum operator is clearly $\vec{P}:=\frac{\hbar}{i}\vec{\nabla}$. ...
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56 views

How the number of charges (colors) and the number of photons (gluons) is connected?

This question is a continuation of "Can a third type of electrical charge exist?" and specifically this comment. I know the common knowledge that there is 1 kind of electric charge and thus 1 kind of ...
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93 views

Can you gauge a $U(1)_L$ symmetry?

I recently calculating the one loop correction for the propagator of a gauge boson, $\hspace{5cm}$ I assumed arbitrary left and right couplings, $ g _L $ and $ g _R $. I found that the one loop ...
4
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0answers
156 views

Chern-Simons on a lattice and the framing anomaly

Can someone make or refer me to the argument for why $U(1)$ Chern-Simons theory in three dimensions cannot be defined by a lattice action? (Unlike Dijkgraaf-Witten theories, which are defined on the ...
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0answers
24 views

What potential between charges leads to confinement

In (2+1)-d, instanton effect leads to a linear potential between charges. If we have two particles with opposite charges in this case, since linear potential diverges when the distance between the two ...
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0answers
48 views

Unitary gauge in $Z_2$ lattice gauge theory with matter field

A $Z_2$ gauge theory with Ising matter field on a 2-dimensional square lattice has the Hamiltonian \begin{equation} H=-t\sum_{\vec r,j}\sigma_j^x(\vec r)-g\sum_{\vec r}\sigma^z_1(\vec ...
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1answer
134 views

Is there a method which quantizes non-abelian gauge theories without path integrals formalism?

In the most QFT books there is a method of quantization of non-abelian theories through path integral methods. But I want to learn also the other methods without using of this formalism. Does anyone ...
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41 views

Gauge formalism in rigid body mechanics

When doing calculations in rigid body mechanics, it is necessary to choose an origin to calculate torques and angular momenta. However, the underlying dynamics does not depend upon the choice of that ...
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1answer
130 views

Is gauge connection unique?

In QFT, given a gauge group and matter field, is the form of the gauge field unique? In other words, given a principal G-bundle and its associated vector bundle, is the construction of the principle ...
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301 views

Gauge Field Tensor from Wilson Loop

It is possible to introduce the gauge field in a QFT purely on geometric arguments. For simplicity, consider QED, only starting with fermions, and seeing how the gauge field naturally emerges. The ...
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2answers
202 views

Questions about the degree of freedom in General Relatity

I'm confused about the number of degrees of freedom in General Relatity. There are two ways to count it. However, they are contradictory. For simplicity, we consider vacuum solution. First, ...
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2answers
123 views

Utility of gauge four-potential $A_{\mu}$ (as opposed to electric and magnetic fields ${\bf E}$ and ${\bf B}$) in E&M?

The action for an electromagnetic field with source charges is given by $$S= \int \left\{ \frac{1}{4\mu_0}F^{\mu\nu}F_{\mu\nu} - J^\mu A_\mu \right\}dx$$ By setting $dS=0$ and taking the Lorenz ...
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2answers
565 views

Faddeev-Popov Ghosts

When quantizing Yang-Mills theory, we introduce the ghosts as a way to gauge-fix the path integral and make sure that we "count" only one contribution from each gauge-orbit of the gauge field ...
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60 views

U(1) local gauge transformation for Dirac spinor field

How can we define U(1) local gauge transformation for Dirac spinor field?, like scalar fields?
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1answer
86 views

How do we know what type of gauge field to add to a theory?

I've been watching Leonard Susskind's particle physics lectures and in one lecture, he discusses a very simple gauge theory. We have a complex scalar field $\phi(x)$ with Lagrangian $$\mathscr{L} = ...
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133 views

From Berry's phase to artificial Gauge potential

How a nonzero geometric phase in a loop is used to generate artificial gauge potentials? If possible, can you also tell how to generate the non-abelian artificial gauge potentials.
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1answer
141 views

Why do we need to prove the gauge invariance of QED (or all of the gauge theories) on the Feynman diagrams language?

Let's have the QED lagrangian. It has explicit gauge invariance, so, by the naive thinking, all of the EM processes must satisfy the property of gauge invariance. So why do we need to recheck of gauge ...
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2answers
271 views

How many physical degrees of freedom does the $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ Yang-Mills theory have?

The $\mathrm{U(1)}$ QED case has two physical degrees of freedom, which is easy to understand because the free electromagnetic field must be transverse to the direction of propagation. But what are ...
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2answers
161 views

Why are the “coupling constants” constant?

The coupling constants (in the gauge theory) fix an inner product on the lie algebra of the gauge group and we use it to define strength of the fields. we are using ad-invariant inner products which ...
2
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2answers
236 views

Why do we require the generators of $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ gauge theories to be $N \times N$ matrices?

I have often read that the generators for $\mathrm{SU(N)}$ gauge theories must be $N \times N$ matrices; see for instance these notes at the top of page 3: ...
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2answers
688 views

Hilbert Space of (quantum) Gauge theory

Since quantum Gauge theory is a quantum mechanical theory, whether someone could explain how to construct and write down the Hilbert Space of quantum Gauge theory with spin-S. (Are there something ...
7
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3answers
2k views

Gravity as a gauge theory

Currently, (classical) gravity (General Relativity) is NOT a gauge theory (at least in the sense of a Yang-Mills theory). Why should "classical" gravity be some (non-trivial or "special" or ...
7
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2answers
760 views

How does non-Abelian gauge symmetry imply the quantization of the corresponding charges?

I read an unjustified treatment in a book, saying that in QED charge an not quantized by the gauge symmetry principle (which totally clear for me: Q the generator of $U(1)$ can be anything in ...
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1answer
273 views

What exactly is a gauge anomaly?

In lots of papers I read about gauge anomalies. For example, avoiding gauge anamolies in the MSSM is the reason for introducing an extra Higgs doublet. Gauge anamolies in the Standard Model are ...
4
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3answers
924 views

Degrees of freedom of the graviton versus classical degrees of freedom

I have a puzzle I can not even understand. A graviton is generally understood in $D$ dimensions as a field with some independent components or degrees of freedom (DOF), from a traceless symmetric ...
7
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1answer
179 views

The 6-j symbol and intersecting Wilson loops, redux

This is a quite specific question continuing the problems I have with computing the expectation value of intersecting Wilson loops I laid out here. Using the tools from the answer there, I quite ...
8
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1answer
298 views

7 sphere, is there any physical interpretation of exotic spheres?

Basically an exotic sphere is topologically a sphere, but doesn't look like a one. Or more accurately: homeomorphic but not diffeomorphic to the standard Euclidean n-sphere The first exotic ...
1
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1answer
132 views

Has a metric formulation of electromagnetism ever been attempted? [duplicate]

I understand that electromagnetic fields carry energy, and this energy curves spacetime gravitationally. That's not my question. I'm asking if anyone has tried to formulate electromagnetism in such ...
4
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0answers
121 views

Naive questions on the classical equations of motion from the Chern-Simons Lagrangian

Consider a Chern-Simons Lagrangian $\mathscr{L}=\mathbf{e}^2-b^2+g\epsilon^{\mu \nu \lambda} a_\mu\partial _\nu a_\lambda$ in 2+1 dimensions, where the 'electromagnetic' fields are $e_i=\partial ...
1
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1answer
130 views

A formula in Sung-Sik Lee's paper

I want to ask if anyone has gone through the derivation of the second equality in the following formula which comes from http://journals.aps.org/prb/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevB.80.165102.
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3answers
386 views

Global vs. local gauge group in mathematical sense - physics examples?

Upon reading about the principal bundle picture of (quantum) field theory I encountered two different definitions of the gauge group: Local gauge group $G$. Corresponds to the fibers of the ...
2
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1answer
108 views

What is the Physical Significance of Tr(A) w.r.t. Matrix Representations in Group Theory

I've seen the post on mathoverflow.SE asking almost the same question, and I have indeed flipped through said answers, but most are in a more general context ie quantum mechanics and do not provide a ...
3
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1answer
102 views

Yang-Mills Lagrangian invariant under BRST

In equation 16.47 in Peskin & Schroeder, it is claimed that $$ -\frac{1}{2}g^2f^{abc}f^{cde}\left(A_{\mu}\,^{b}c^{d}c^{e}+A_{\mu}\,^{d}c^{e}c^{b}+A_{\mu}\,^{e}c^{b}c^{d}\right) ~=~ 0 \tag{16.47}$$ ...
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2answers
264 views

Why is the periodicity of fields in finite temperature QCD consequence of Trace in the action?

In finite temperature QCD, the gauge fields must be periodic in temporal direction. They say this is the consequence of trace in the action for gauge fields. How does trace imply that the fields must ...
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2answers
387 views

Why do we seek to preserve gauge symmetries after quantization?

Gauge symmetries do not give rise to conservation laws via Noether's theorem, and they represent redundancies in our description of the system. So why do we want to keep them after quantization? For ...
5
votes
1answer
497 views

Gauge invariance and Feynman path-integrals

Let me look at the Hamiltonian of a charged particle in a plane in a constant magnetic field ($\vec{B}$) pointing upwards - then in usual notation it is, $$\hat{H} = \frac{1}{2m}\biggl(\hat{p} + ...
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121 views

Faddeev Popov Gauge Fixing in Electromagnetism

Reading section 9.4 in Peskin, I am wondering about the following: The functional integral on $A_{\mu}$ diverges for pure-gauge configurations, because for those configurations, the action is zero. ...
7
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2answers
291 views

Counting the number of propagating degrees of freedom in Lorenz Gauge Electrodynamics

How do I definitively show that there are only two propagating degrees of freedom in the Lorenz Gauge $\partial_\mu A^\mu=0$ in classical electrodynamics. I need an clear argument that involves the ...
8
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2answers
489 views

What is the origin of the factor of $-1/4$ in the Maxwell Lagrangian?

I have seen numerous 'derivations' of the Maxwell Lagrangian, $$\mathcal{L} ~=~ -\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu \nu}F^{\mu \nu},$$ but every one has sneakily inserted a factor of $-1/4$ without explaining why. ...
6
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1answer
66 views

How many coupling constants if my gauge group has many factors?

I am reading a review article where $U(1)\times{}SU(2)\times{}SU(3)$ gauge transformations are considered. It says that when such a gauge transformation is done the gauge fields $A^{\alpha}_{\mu}$ ...
11
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2answers
681 views

argument about fallacy of diff(M) being a gauge group for general relativity

I want to outline a solid argument (or bulletpoints) to show how weak is the idea of diff(M) being the gauge group of general relativity. basically i have these points that in my view are very solid ...