A gauge theory has internal degrees of freedom that do not affect the foretold physical outcomes of the theory. The theory has a Lie group of *continuous symmetries* of these internal degrees of freedom, *i.e.* the predicted physics under any transformation in this group on the degrees of freedom. ...

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How many fundamental forces could there be?

We’re told that ‘all forces are gauge forces’. The process seems to start with the Lagrangian corresponding to a particle-type, then the application of a local gauge symmetry leading to the emergence ...
3
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1answer
637 views

Lattice QCD and string theory

I've heard the claim that some aspects of string theory are used to improve Monte-Carlo simulations of lattice QCD, for example by people working at the LHC. I know a bit about Monte-Carlo methods in ...
7
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2answers
226 views

Is there a meaning to the E,B analogues of other gauge fields?

From the gauge field $A_\mu$ and the QED lagrangian we can derive maxwell's equations in terms of electric and magnetic fields. Are there any situations where similar derivations using the other gauge ...
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1answer
373 views

What is the spectral energy density of virtual photons around a unit charge at rest?

Given that my previous question, namely "What is the number density of virtual photons around a unit charge?" has no precise answer, here is a more precise wording: What is the virtual photon ...
4
votes
2answers
438 views

Diff(M) and requirements on GR observables

This question is kind of inspired in this one: Diff(M) as a gauge group and local observables in theories with gravity The conundrum i'm trying to understand is how is derived the (quite) ...
4
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1answer
591 views

What is “localisation” of instantons?

I often encountered the term "localization" in the context of instantons, as for example in the work of Nekrasov on extensions of Seiberg-Witten theory to N=1 gauge theories. Could someone give a ...
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2answers
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What's the point of having an einbein in your action?

One often comes across actions written with an extra auxiliary field, with respect to which if you vary the action, you get the equation of motion of the auxiliary field, which when plugged into the ...
2
votes
1answer
425 views

Single trace partition function

I would be glad if someone can help me understand the argument in appendix B.1 and B.2 (page 76 to 80) of this paper. The argument in B.1 supposedly helps understand how the authors in that paper ...
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798 views

Nonlinear optics as gauge theory

the widely used approach to nonlinear optics is a Taylor expansion of the dielectric displacement field $\mathbf{D} = \epsilon_0\cdot\mathbf{E} + \mathbf{P}$ in a Fourier representation of the ...